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Thread: Ive never hunted. Just out of curiosity...

  1. #1

    Default Ive never hunted. Just out of curiosity...

    when some of you go on a moose, or sheep or bear hunt, what are the steps you take after getting your catch/kill?

    Is it true that the meat will go bad quickly in the summer if you dont take care of it immediately?

    How long does it take to take a bear or moose apart to be able to carry? Or do you just carry him whole?

    How much meat (percentage) do you get out of the animal? A moose? Sheep? Bear? Caribou?

    Ive always been curious about these things but have never had anyone to ask. I know the guys on the forum are alright with these rookie questions because I once asked 'why dont you just shoot the animal in the head' and no one made fun of me so that was cool.

    Anyways, thanks for taking the time to answer.
    Random guy in Fly shop: "Where did this happen???? In real life or in Alaska?"

  2. #2
    Mark
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    Quote Originally Posted by sodabiscuit12345 View Post
    ....Is it true that the meat will go bad quickly in the summer if you dont take care of it immediately?....
    Yes, but basic care will remedy that. Skinning the carcass removes the insulative cover for the meat, and allows it to cool. Skinned, bagged, and kept in shade works in 50 degrees or lower temps. Warmer than that could be trouble.

    ....How long does it take to take a bear or moose apart to be able to carry? Or do you just carry him whole?...
    I once shot a moose and stood over him at approximately noon. I completely field dressed him, bagged him, and packed him about 200 yards to my canoe on a pack frame, then paddled 2.5 hours out by 5 pm. I was all alone and 39 years old at the time.

    How much meat (percentage) do you get out of the animal? A moose? Sheep? Bear? Caribou?
    Reference:

    ....A bull moose will yield 350 to 750 pounds of mostly boned meat and will require four to eight round trips carrying approximately 100 pounds per trip. A big raw brown bear hide can weigh over 120 pounds, but it can be cut in half if necessary. Even a big bull caribou will yield 150-180 pounds of boned meat and a Dall sheep ram about 80 pounds plus the weight of the horns and cape.....
    The meat of a mammal weighs roughly half as much as the animal on the hoof (not counting bone).

    When I field dress animals I leave the meat on the bone. I do that mostly because the bone provides something to tie meat up with or something solid to grab when wrestling the bags, but more and more regs require the meat to stay on the bone. It is thought that there will be less waste that way.

  3. #3
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    when some of you go on a moose, or sheep or bear hunt, what are the steps you take after getting your catch/kill?

    Make sure it is dead and not sufferiing. Lay out the tools needed to butcher the animal to include the gae bags and large piece of plastic to keep the meat clean.

    Is it true that the meat will go bad quickly in the summer if you dont take care of it immediately?

    Generally, yes. Cooling it is the biggest, most importatnt things to do. Keeping it in the shade and hung up helps alot.

    How long does it take to take a bear or moose apart to be able to carry? Or do you just carry him whole?

    IT takes about three hours with two people, four sometimes for a moose. You are not going to carry it out whole unless its a hunt on base where it might drop close to a road and you can winch it onto a trailer. But generally, cut it up where it lays into quarters, ribs, backstrap and tenderloins and "scrap"

    How much meat (percentage) do you get out of the animal? A moose? Sheep? Bear? Caribou?
    Page 29 of this year's regulation book gives you a general idea of what you will get. As an example, a 1650 pound bull moose will result in 564 pounds of boned meat.

    Ive always been curious about these things but have never had anyone to ask. I know the guys on the forum are alright with these rookie questions because I once asked 'why dont you just shoot the animal in the head' and no one made fun of me so that was cool.

    If you are in Anchorage, I'll be glad to show you pictures of the "process".

  4. #4
    Supporting Member bullbuster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sodabiscuit12345 View Post
    I once asked 'why dont you just shoot the animal in the head' and no one made fun of me so that was cool.
    I like head shots on moose & caribou and deer. If I ever get the chance at an elephant, that's the shot. Yet to see a legal one though.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark View Post
    I once shot a moose and stood over him at approximately noon. I completely field dressed him, bagged him, and packed him about 200 yards to my canoe on a pack frame, then paddled 2.5 hours out by 5 pm. I was all alone and 39 years old at the time.
    Mark, you must be an animal, I want to hunt with you. Either that or there was a couple of brown furry things waiting for their turn. (Been there)

    The BEST solo moose I've done is 2 hours from the shot to the last chunk of meat in the truck and I drug him to the road and chopped him up there. Well there was the 4 wheeler moose (first and last) that I cut in half and, with help, rolled up on the wheeler. That might have been faster. The butcher loved that one.
    The longest was 2 days of cutting and packing on 2 bulls. Last time we shot any that far in.
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    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Soda,

    You been watching "Into the Wild" again

    I am kidding. Glad you asked actually. The wife and I float NW rivers nearly every year. Usually a 10-13 day float fly fishing for dollies. Lately, I have thought more and more about taking a bou tag with me. We always see them but I was unsure of how to care for the meat while out on a longer float trip. This post has me thinking about it again.
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

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    Default meat care

    One thing no one has touched on yet......Besides cooling the meat as quickly as possible, Try to avoid moisture as much as possible. Moisture causes all sorts of bad things to start growing on the meat and will cause it to spoil much quicker than if kept dry. Along with avoiding moisture goes good air circulation. Many larger animals are often quartered or cut up even more and hung until they can be transported. You want the meat dry, and you want good circulation of air. You also want to keep bugs from feeding on or laying eggs on the meat. Nothing like maggots to turn people off to game meat! There are a variety of cloths suck as cheese cloth and other fine weave material that will keep bugs out and let air circulate. A tarp hung over the top (not touching) the hanging meat will keep rain off and still allow air circulation.

    One thing to avoid....unless it is very cold as in close to freezing, don't put the meat in plastic bags, especially if the meat is still warm. Plastic holds in moisture, lets the air in the bag become stagnant, and holds in heat. All these things cause bacteria to grow and will spoil your meat. If you are around freezing, you can get away with it as bacteria don't multiply nearly as fast as at warmer temps.

    I do have a friend, who on remote summer deer hunts, will put the deer meat in a watertight plastic bag and sink it in a stream or pond to cool the meat initially, but then he hangs it so it can get air.

  7. #7
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    These guys are all right.

    I just posted some relevent "How to" and a few pix on the "Boneing meat" thread.

    Yep, keep it clean, keep it dry, get it fresh air, after you shoot it in the head, my personal, favorite ,shot.

  8. #8
    Mark
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    Quote Originally Posted by bullbuster View Post
    Originally Posted by Mark
    I once shot a moose and stood over him at approximately noon. I completely field dressed him, bagged him, and packed him about 200 yards to my canoe on a pack frame, then paddled 2.5 hours out by 5 pm. I was all alone and 39 years old at the time.
    Mark, you must be an animal, I want to hunt with you. Either that or there was a couple of brown furry things waiting for their turn. (Been there)....
    I'm an old animal, now. I'm sure I can still do a moose solo, but I'm also sure it would be at a much slower pace.

    I once did a moose that had been killed by a train. I had a bucket loader, so I scooped her up and carried her to a tool shed we had, and pushed out the snow from all around.

    That part was nice.

    But the only knife I had was a Gerber Ultralite. It's a 2" blade.

    I did two moose with that little knife over the years...........

    ....The longest was 2 days of cutting and packing on 2 bulls. Last time we shot any that far in.
    You're braver than I. The longest pack I've done on a moose was a bit over a mile, and there were 4 men there to participate.
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  9. #9
    Mark
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    Quote Originally Posted by twodux View Post
    ....One thing to avoid....unless it is very cold as in close to freezing, don't put the meat in plastic bags, especially if the meat is still warm. Plastic holds in moisture, lets the air in the bag become stagnant, and holds in heat. All these things cause bacteria to grow and will spoil your meat. If you are around freezing, you can get away with it as bacteria don't multiply nearly as fast as at warmer temps.....
    Yup. Plastic is a no-no. The meat has to breathe.

    ....I do have a friend, who on remote summer deer hunts, will put the deer meat in a watertight plastic bag and sink it in a stream or pond to cool the meat initially, but then he hangs it so it can get air.
    I've never had to do that, but the folks at Indian Valley Meats actually recommend it.

  10. #10
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    Default I'm with them

    I'm with the folks at Indian Valley meats for the most part. Where I hunt, there are enough beavers and other animals using the streams not to mention dead rotting salmon, that I'll pass on getting my meat wet from the water. If I ever water cool my meat, it will be in a water tight bag. I can always wipe the meat down after it's cooled to get rid af any excess blood. For that we use a mix of distilled vinegar and water. The vinegar acts like citrus as the acid knocks out bacteria.

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