Results 1 to 19 of 19

Thread: instep crampons

  1. #1

    Default instep crampons

    I have used some instep crampons on a couple of hunts/climbs/hikes and found them to a real help at times. I was wondering if any of the more experienced of the experience/crowd has opinions on them.

    Helps going up mountains with wet grass and such in Kodiak quite a bit easier.

  2. #2
    Member Bighorse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Ketchikan, Alaska
    Posts
    2,032

    Default Weight issues

    I bought a pair and found them poorly constructed and instable really. I think it might be that I am a larger hunter at 220Ibs. Add a pack of any size and all of a sudden those two little spikes are taking a huge lateral load and bending too much. Not to mention you need the correct insole on your boots to support them.

    My feeling is if it's that bad you might as well have a harness and rope. I also know how it goes on the mountain and those mountain critters don't often fall where you want them to. I've owned em, used em, threw em out. My .02

  3. #3
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    931

    Lightbulb Extra Traction & In-step Crampons

    Quote Originally Posted by green sourdough View Post
    I have used some instep crampons on a couple of hunts/climbs/hikes and found them to a real help at times. I was wondering if any of the more experienced of the experience/crowd has opinions on them.

    Helps going up mountains with wet grass and such in Kodiak quite a bit easier.
    High Quality In-step crampons are available, work very effectively when used properly, and will last near a lifetime of service. Several of the better instep crampons are based on the designs long in use by trekkers in the Alps...

    --- noticed this poster's comment ---
    "bought a pair and found them poorly constructed and instable really.... all of a sudden those two little spikes are taking a huge lateral load and bending... you need the correct insole on your boots to support them....
    I've owned em, used em, threw em out. My .02"

    *** Well... Ya bought cheap "creepers" (not instep crampons) & the two should not be confused.***
    (no jab here - please do not see it as such)

    Creepers (almost all are 4-point) are to be generally used for easier outings, yet some are more multi-use and durable than others.

    Real In-step Crampons will afford a greater degree of sure footing on slippery or challenging terrain... particularly when traction patterns and materials of primary footwear begin to falter.

    General piece of mountain climbing history is worth noting -
    Back in the day, crampons had all points down (often pattern of 8 & none protruding forward). Early mountaineers set out in a more assault style, usually teams in numbers, and literally cut steps into steeper slippery and more technical terrain. This differs from the modern day alpine style.

    Proper technique or movement with in-step crampons (likely 4-6 point) is very similar to the old'n day foot placement methods, foot sequencing, & certainly worth a look.
    FREEDOM OF THE HILLS is a great classic source.

    Here are a few good ones I can suggest that are good choices for secure traction:
    Petzl Crab 6 Instep
    AUSTRI ALPIN 6-Point
    Camp 6 Point Instep
    Camp's 6 Punte Light

    Creepers are more like:
    CMI instep
    Camp Quattro Four Point Instep

    I'm including a picture of the type I've used since grade school - still going strong 30+ years later... They are more in the creeper category, however made by a certifiable Austrian mountaineering company called Stubai, simple, and rugged. They work well on ice, wet logs, wet rock, wet vegetation, and so on.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  4. #4
    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Big Lake
    Posts
    8,439

    Default

    I've used the CMI insteps and now own a pair, i won't do goat hunts without them in my pack. if you have good boots on they'll save your bacon time and time again, a walkin' axe will top off the gear very well and you'll have alot more fun sidehilling. i don't think creepers would work that great in bad boots, i think its a combination of things that make them all successfull.
    I didn't really like the full crampons with big teeth, i drag my feet, not good...lol just about sent me flying down the mountain when they hung up on stuff.
    Insteps are my favorite so far....
    Www.blackriverhunting.com
    Master guide 212

  5. #5
    Member 8x57 Mauser's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Southeast Alaska
    Posts
    513

  6. #6

    Default instep crampons

    I found a link to a previous post here:
    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...d.php?p=375847

    Sounds like these type of crampons are/have been used quite a bit.
    I ran into the CMI models and think they are the cats meow on the steep stuff:
    http://www.cmi-gear.com/catalog/essentials/crampons.asp

    I might have to take a look at those other ones. I do have a pair of full crampons and am not looking for that much though.

    Thanks for the responses.

  7. #7
    Member Bighorse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Ketchikan, Alaska
    Posts
    2,032

    Default CMI

    Those CMI brand instep crampons are what I used. I was up in goat country and in snow when I had my failure with that particular product.

    I think two things happened.....I was wearing Danner boots and they really don't have an instep neccessarly and I'm just large.

    I'm not jabbed by the previous post and find that information to be very useful, Thank you. If I choose to use them again I'll fix them to a different style boot like a Lowa Sheep hunter or Kentrek. After my experience I bought a Black Diamond full size crampons but have yet to get the right boot for em.

    Whatever you do be careful up there. Sliding in the Alpine is a serious safety concern.

  8. #8
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    11,415

    Default

    Dang big horse, you keep talking like 220 is is huge... I haven't been 220 since I walked out of basic training and that was 9 years and over 50lbs ago. There are a few guys on here that are pretty hard core back country hunters in the 270+ range who post gear recommendations fairly regularly. If you check the archives a bit you should be able to find some pretty good info on gear that will be able to take the added stress of us "trophy class" hunters.

  9. #9
    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Big Lake
    Posts
    8,439

    Default

    what kinda failure did you have? in snow or anything mucky those insteps fill up with stuff and its like standing on a wet bowling ball..gotta knock them clean every so often...
    Www.blackriverhunting.com
    Master guide 212

  10. #10
    Member RANGER RICK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Homer Alaska
    Posts
    704

    Default

    BRWNBR

    What type of walking ax are you talking about ??
    Thanks

    RR





    Quote Originally Posted by BRWNBR View Post
    I've used the CMI insteps and now own a pair, i won't do goat hunts without them in my pack. if you have good boots on they'll save your bacon time and time again, a walkin' axe will top off the gear very well and you'll have alot more fun sidehilling. i don't think creepers would work that great in bad boots, i think its a combination of things that make them all successfull.
    I didn't really like the full crampons with big teeth, i drag my feet, not good...lol just about sent me flying down the mountain when they hung up on stuff.
    Insteps are my favorite so far....
    Practice does not make perfect !!!!!
    Perfect Practice makes perfect !!!!!!!!!!


    USS SARATOGA CV-60

    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v5...ex_2-1-1-1.gif

  11. #11
    Member Roger45's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    966

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BRWNBR View Post
    what kinda failure did you have? in snow or anything mucky those insteps fill up with stuff and its like standing on a wet bowling ball..gotta knock them clean every so often...
    I don't know what failure he had...but the things I have seen...4 point instep crampons constantly roll into the instep; under certain snow conditions you can get the snow to ball up between your sole and the crampon (usually in corn snow condition), but if you keep your crampons cold before putting them on this seems to minimalize that problem; if there is a big (raised) heel on your boot, they may not fit very well and create a large gap between the sole and the crampon.
    "...and then Jack chopped down the beanstock, adding murder and ecological vandalism to the theft, enticement and vandalism charges already mentioned, but he got away with it and lived happily ever after without so much as a guilty twinge about what he had done. Which proves that you can be excused just about anything if you're a hero, because no one asks the inconvenient questions." Terry Pratchett's The Hogfather

  12. #12
    Member H_I_L_L_B_I_L_L_Y's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    452

    Default How about these

    Ive been eyeballin these for a goat hunt. Anybody ever use Kahtoola KTS Steel Crampons. Hillbilly

  13. #13
    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Big Lake
    Posts
    8,439

    Default

    a walkin' axe is basicly a long ice axe, mine are 100 and 110 cm tall, barneys used to carry them. but they are the best for mountian hunting, you can keep trekkin' poles for....well treking. when you want something you can lean you whole body/pack weight on and not have it fold in half a walkin' axe is it. best thing i've ever done was start carrying those.

    Www.blackriverhunting.com
    Master guide 212

  14. #14
    Moderator kingfisherktn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Ketchikan, AK
    Posts
    4,076

    Default

    Hey Jake, I see some loose straps on that pack, sure you couldn't have added some more weight to it?

    You are THE man!

  15. #15
    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Big Lake
    Posts
    8,439

    Default

    oh ya those straps...thats my uhhh brakes when i hit the alders with my feet over my head....
    Www.blackriverhunting.com
    Master guide 212

  16. #16
    Moderator kingfisherktn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Ketchikan, AK
    Posts
    4,076

    Default

    Any picture of you trying that?

  17. #17
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    11,415

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BRWNBR View Post
    a walkin' axe is basicly a long ice axe, mine are 100 and 110 cm tall, barneys used to carry them. but they are the best for mountian hunting, you can keep trekkin' poles for....well treking. when you want something you can lean you whole body/pack weight on and not have it fold in half a walkin' axe is it. best thing i've ever done was start carrying those.

    I've been meaning to ask if this client asked you to shoot his bear for him too?

    How emasculated I would feel asking another man to carry my pack strapped to his!

  18. #18
    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Big Lake
    Posts
    8,439

    Default

    lol ya i'd feel a little small if someone carried my gear out. but in this pic it was a client i'd hunted with 4 other times and he was having some leg cramp problems on his goat hunt, only got 200 yards from the tent, carrying his load was the least i could do. do whatcha gotta
    Www.blackriverhunting.com
    Master guide 212

  19. #19

    Default

    I don't know about actual hunting conditions, but my training hike today up Mt Baldy found the Kahtoola Steel Traction System Crampons working quiet well. I must say that I was very pleased with the performance in the ice and packed snow. Seemed to offer pretty good support for my large (280lb) frame. Would recommend them based on my experiences so far. As a note this was my first time to actually use them, but they seemed quiet natural without any issues.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •