Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 58

Thread: I need help from those who know

  1. #1
    New member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    3

    Question I need help from those who know

    I.m looking for a hunting and target rifle Primaryn use -moose hunting.
    so it has to have the stopping power for moose or bear.Accurate for 0 to 700 yards. Eventually I would
    like to become proficient enough to hit a milk jug at 1000 yards.
    (Note I will not be hunting at 1000 yards. So please don't turn this into an ethical debate.)
    The only concern I have is the recoil after my second ATV accident. Coller bone, sholder, wrist & elbow
    injury-
    recoil has become a problem.I would prefer the weapon to have a muzzel break
    thumb hole stock, I am looking at the 300 to 338. If you know of a smaller caliber that will do what I
    need, I'll take suggestions on everything from caliber, stock, muzzel break, and optics.I would like to
    get it pre assembeled need be I'll get it from different places and assemble it myself, but prefer not to.
    i almost forgot my budget is $2400 but i'll invest more if i need to

  2. #2
    Member pinehavensredrocket's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    wisconsin
    Posts
    759

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by oldgear View Post
    I.m looking for a hunting and target rifle Primaryn use -moose hunting.
    so it has to have the stopping power for moose or bear.Accurate for 0 to 700 yards. Eventually I would
    like to become proficient enough to hit a milk jug at 1000 yards.
    (Note I will not be hunting at 1000 yards. So please don't turn this into an ethical debate.)
    The only concern I have is the recoil after my second ATV accident. Coller bone, sholder, wrist & elbow
    injury-
    recoil has become a problem.I would prefer the weapon to have a muzzel break
    thumb hole stock, I am looking at the 300 to 338. If you know of a smaller caliber that will do what I
    need, I'll take suggestions on everything from caliber, stock, muzzel break, and optics.I would like to
    get it pre assembeled need be I'll get it from different places and assemble it myself, but prefer not to.
    i almost forgot my budget is $2400 but i'll invest more if i need to
    no problem; a lazer guided missle is just the ticket....and cheap too!

    1000yds?? whoa

    jh

  3. #3
    Member Phil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Liverpool, NY (a suburb of Syracuse)
    Posts
    494

    Default 06

    I'm not sure about those 700 yard shots but I have a ported 30-06 that killed a nice moose at about 100 yards. It really is easy on recoil. Use a good quality bullet that penertates well (say 180 or 200 grains). Should be a good gun. Not a bear stopper at close range but then again, I don't know of anything with a mild recoil that is a bear buster.

    Don't ask why but I own an 06 that is ported and a 375 that isn't. I do like the porting but the "push" of the 375 doesn't seem to bother me. On the other hand, it isn't a 700 yard rifle (unless you like shooting like a mortar).

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Yukon Canada
    Posts
    1,289

    Default 7mm

    look into a 7mm of some kind. 7mm bullets have a very high bc, and recoil is not bad. look at best of the west website. they will make you a long range tackdriver and show you how to shoot those jugs at super long range! have fun! ps. glad to hear you dont plan on shooting game at that range!! in my experince most hunters shouldnt shoot past 250 at a real animial!

  5. #5
    New member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    3

    Default

    I've inherited my father's gun collection. I have to start learning somewhere. If 1000 yards is an unobtainable goal, simply say so. I don't believe there is any need to be a sarcastic *****. pinehavensredrocket

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    2 mi east of 'Halfmoon creek"
    Posts
    831

    Default

    Any large calibers in your gun collection?

    I'd look at 500 yards first, 300-338 can do it +..

    If I'm shooting a milk jug at a 1000 yds, it will be a large cow....

    Good Luck

  7. #7

    Default

    I would look at a 300 ultra mag with a bull barrel and a muzzle break I have a remington that I can hit a pie plate 7 out of 10 times at 600 yards.

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    NorthWest Alaska
    Posts
    3,635

    Default

    I use a Sako M-39.
    Nice and heavily built, tack driving accurate,**** reliable in extream cold, plenty of power downrange(= to a 30-06).
    Caribou Moose and Muskoxen all drop with a well placed hit.

    If I can see it, I can hit it.

    Besides, for 300$ you wil be in your budget.

  9. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by oldgear View Post
    I.m looking for a hunting and target rifle Primaryn use -moose hunting.
    so it has to have the stopping power for moose or bear.Accurate for 0 to 700 yards. Eventually I would
    like to become proficient enough to hit a milk jug at 1000 yards.
    (Note I will not be hunting at 1000 yards. So please don't turn this into an ethical debate.)
    The only concern I have is the recoil after my second ATV accident. Coller bone, sholder, wrist & elbow
    injury-
    recoil has become a problem.I would prefer the weapon to have a muzzel break
    thumb hole stock, I am looking at the 300 to 338. If you know of a smaller caliber that will do what I
    need, I'll take suggestions on everything from caliber, stock, muzzel break, and optics.I would like to
    get it pre assembeled need be I'll get it from different places and assemble it myself, but prefer not to.
    i almost forgot my budget is $2400 but i'll invest more if i need to
    $2400 will get you to 700 yds but not likely 1000. There are a lot of guys who shoot and hunt to 1000 yds and further. To consistantly hit a milk jug at a 1000 yds takes a good outfit and there aren't many out of the box rifles that can do it. If you get one, you're lucky. Hitting a milk jug at 1000 yds is less than 1/2 MOA accuracy, and for that you'll need to do some customizing and a lot of practice.

    Scope $1200 - $1700
    Custom(ized)Rifle $2000 - $4000 and up
    Range finder - $600 and up
    Misc costs, software, weather stations, bi-pods,
    and lots of ammo for load development and practice.

    Recommended Cartridges
    7mm, Rum, STW, Dakota, WSM
    300, 30-378, RUM, WM, WSM
    338, 338-378, RUM, Lapua, EDGE

    These are some of the most popular, but there are others.

    Have fun, nothing like putting the bullet on target down range.

  10. #10
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    931

    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by oldgear View Post
    I.m looking for a hunting and target rifle Primaryn use -moose hunting.
    so it has to have the stopping power for moose or bear.Accurate for 0 to 700 yards. Eventually I would
    like to become proficient enough to hit a milk jug at 1000 yards.
    (Note I will not be hunting at 1000 yards. So please don't turn this into an ethical debate.)
    The only concern I have is the recoil after my second ATV accident. Coller bone, sholder, wrist & elbow
    injury-
    recoil has become a problem.I would prefer the weapon to have a muzzel break
    thumb hole stock, I am looking at the 300 to 338. If you know of a smaller caliber that will do what I
    need, I'll take suggestions on everything from caliber, stock, muzzel break, and optics.I would like to
    get it pre assembeled need be I'll get it from different places and assemble it myself, but prefer not to.
    i almost forgot my budget is $2400 but i'll invest more if i need to
    Let's talk target... A milk jug "group" @ 1000 yards is probably unrealistic --- you'll require a benchrest winning gun, optics to drive you to your target, all squared/tuned, with conditions and shooting skills all in sync. In other words a 5"-6" group at 1000 yards will have you among the extended range elite. $2500 simply wont get 'er done not even close! So... we'll keep things at potentially obtainable accuracy say <600 yards, concentrating at a more realistic precision from muzzle to 350 yards.

    Now to assess what you may have (or are looking to buy) for hunting large/heavy game... I can only figure from your post - that you're pretty young, neither well versed 'yet' nor purchased many firearms. (Just noticed you inherited some) That said, if this is not the case it's also never too late to learn & enjoy. Several years worth of both good and not so good threads already posted on this forum to address this sort of stuff --- I'd recommend reading some. You are on the right track tho' --- get familiar with the guns you've been given, take care of them, remember who they came from, and respect gun safety practices.

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    712

    Default

    I'm confused as to whether you're buying a new rifle or using one of your fathers, but...

    Standard answer to a question like this: If you have to ask, get a 30-06. For scopes, if you have to ask, get a Leupold 4x. For rifle brands, if you have to ask, don't get a browning a-bolt, tikka, or mossberg bolt. Instead, for an idiot-proof rifle that's likely to be accurate, get a Ruger or a Weatherby Vanguard. The Vanguard will kick a bit less, as they tend to be heavier than other sporter-weight rifles. A Vanguard in 30-06 with a 4x leupold will kill anything in this continent.

    If you don't reload, the amount of ammo spent shooting/practice you put in to get proficient at the ranges you are describing will crush you financially.

    I recommend that for now you jump back into the land of we mortals and get to know the rifle of your choice and how it shoots at ranges up to 300 yards. If you can reliably hit a pie plate at that range from field shooting positions, then start throwing your energy at longer ranges.

    For longer ranges, use whatever the heck you want, so long as it makes sufficient velocity at those huge ranges to allow the bullet to expand. You'll need a laser rangefinder and a lot of time spent shooting at distances up to and beyond your hunting range.

    Muzzle brakes are the great farce of shooting. They work great, but you will go deaf if you shoot them without hearing protection. The're no cure-all for recoil sensitivity, unless you don't care about your hearing.

  12. #12
    Member jay51's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    S.C. Alaska
    Posts
    231

    Default

    It is possible, but if you're going to bust milk-jugs at 1000yds, plan on spending half that budget on quality high-power optics.

    If recoil is a big issue, check-out the Howa Knoxx Axiom:

    http://www.legacysports.com/products...owa_axiom.html

    They even have big-caliber combos with scopes & all. I don't know anything about Nitghteater scopes, I've never shot a Howa rifle. I have a Knoxx comp-stock on my shotgun though, and it makes 12ga slugs downright tolerable.

    Have fun choosing a caliber!
    Last edited by jay51; 01-04-2009 at 21:29. Reason: grammar

  13. #13
    Member Bear Buster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    EAGLE RIVER, ALASKA
    Posts
    461

    Default

    I use this and this ... this combo is very accurate and low felt recoil.
    This combo with lots of practice should get you to 90% of your goal...
    all bets are off if you can't shoot.
    "Well, the trouble with our liberal friends is not that they are ignorant, but that they know so much that isn't so." - Ronald Reagan

  14. #14
    Member akshrop's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    North Pole, AK
    Posts
    448

    Default

    Well I hope you get good enough to do it and it should be fun trying. 1000 yards is a long way to shoot, but it is done. Good goal as long as you have the mind set to start at closer ranges and work your way up. My Dad is a great fan of the 257 wby. He swears by it and he is the best marksman I have ever personally known and I have known quite a few. I have seen him make incredible far shots with it. Much farther than any I would try. Never had a range finder, but with pacing off, he has made approximately 500-700 (big spread due to bad memory) yard head shots on antelope. I think he told me he took a deer at 800 plus once, which I believe, but canít remember for sure. Anyway good luck and enjoy the journey.

  15. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    wasilla
    Posts
    788

    Default

    If you are looking for a all around game stopper and long range shooting look at what our sniper use in the Mil.

    First I do not want to step on the toe's in this thread, there are a large number of great cal's out there and did not see a single suggestion that was out of place.

    The mil snipers are using 308, 300wm, and 338wm I think there maybe a 338 lapua that was tested as well. The problem with long shots is you have to have enough mass in the bullet to get to the end and still stay on target (wind, weight and gravity etc). Well, there are the 4 that the mil use.
    Wanting the extra punch for the big game, the 308cal is a bit under powerd when it is called on(at longer range) It does however have a very sweet recoil much less than the 30-06 which is a tried and true cal.

    The 300wm and the 338wm are mass pushing monsters to that 1000 yd shoot but they tend to stop being fun after 40 to 60rd in a dayfor target shooting (i know)
    I too wanted to drop the recoil on one of my long gun and looked into the ported barrel idea. I was almost sold on the idea but did not want the noise that comes with it. The answer was the Limb saver recoil pad and it does work very well.

    Quik note, there is a hole list of what it will take to get that round on a milk jug at 800yds much less 1000. I.E. Barrel,action, stock, trigger, scope,rings, mount, and a worked up load for that platform. (all lazered and alined) 1/2 moa rifle is very expensive to build i believe the SR25 that the mil use is about 10k.

    Scope min leopold mark 4 target turrets and bullet compensator for the cal and bullet weight. Sheppered make a great scope as well that has some of this built into the scope. Nightforce is the 3rd all being in the area of min 1000$ plus scopes
    Bypod, sling, etc.

    The problem with this is now the weapon ways about 14lbs. It is not fun packing this with all the other gear that you will be packing.
    I would look at getting into a solid 600yd shooter with a above averge scope and rifle, learn to shoot well at that distance and then bump up with a 308cal target rifle that is not expensive to shoot or hard on the shoulder. I have left out a lot on what to look for as well but most have already stated it earlier in the thread.
    Good luck and have fun. T

    Sweepint
    Wasilla, (when not overseas)
    '' Livn' The Dream ''
    26' Hewescraft Cuddy, twin 115 Yam

  16. #16
    Member pinehavensredrocket's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    wisconsin
    Posts
    759

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by oldgear View Post
    I've inherited my father's gun collection. I have to start learning somewhere. If 1000 yards is an unobtainable goal, simply say so. I don't believe there is any need to be a sarcastic *****. pinehavensredrocket

    you are right! i thought the question was meant as a joke. 1000yds is way beyond even expert shooters ability. under hunting conditions half that is a stretch.

    my best advice is to go to a reputable gunshop and discuss some of these questions....locate a good coach, and learn the fundamentals of high power shooting. given reasonable skill, the desire to learn, and proper equipment, you can learn to be a good shot. your progress will probably determine what kind of rifle best for you. good luck and

    happy trails.
    jh

  17. #17

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pinehavensredrocket View Post
    1000yds is way beyond even expert shooters ability.
    No it's not... with the right equipment, a little training and practice it's very doable.

  18. #18

    Default

    What guns did you inherit? I would suggest you practice with the guns you already own. Jumping into a $2400 gun right off the bat doesn't make alot of sense until you have the basics down. I recently watched a video of military snipers and they missed a man size target at that range a few times. Go slow, work your way up. A milk jug at 1K yards is doable but takes years of practice and thousands of rounds. Anything that is a "bear stopper" is going to hurt plain and simple,you either sacrifice your shoulder or your ears. An 06 or 300wm are great rifles for hunting in alaska but neither are what I consider bear stoppers if there really is such a thing. Shooting a rifle well in any caliber is the best bear protection you can get. Get instruction from a good shooter, read all you can and have fun.

  19. #19
    Member Bear Buster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    EAGLE RIVER, ALASKA
    Posts
    461

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pinehavensredrocket View Post
    you are right! i thought the question was meant as a joke. 1000yds is way beyond even expert shooters ability. under hunting conditions half that is a stretch.

    my best advice is to go to a reputable gunshop and discuss some of these questions....locate a good coach, and learn the fundamentals of high power shooting. given reasonable skill, the desire to learn, and proper equipment, you can learn to be a good shot. your progress will probably determine what kind of rifle best for you. good luck and

    happy trails.
    jh
    I think the title was .... I need help from those who know
    "Well, the trouble with our liberal friends is not that they are ignorant, but that they know so much that isn't so." - Ronald Reagan

  20. #20
    Member akshrop's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    North Pole, AK
    Posts
    448

    Default

    Lots of interesting things said in here about equipment and I am not saying its not important, but why could snipers 50 plus years ago make these shots and we can't today without these things? I know that the new stuff is better and its helps a lot, but it is possible on a smaller budget. I think the biggest limitation on long shots is vision. If you can't see it, you can't hit it. He did say that he wasnít wanted to hunt at these ranges, only target shoot at these ranges. So trail and error are no issue. The MOA is a lot less important when it is ok to miss 3 out of 4 times on such a small target at this range. Walking into the target is also fine. Practice at extreme ranges is a great way to gain confidence in your abilities; as long as you are ok with missing and hard work. We used to routinely shoot at 800 yard targets in the Army. We had big targets, but no optics. We donít seem to do that much anymore, but it was a great confidence boost in the old days. It is most defiantly possible and possible without laser guided smart bombs. I say go for it, you will only become a better rifleman for it as long as you donít give up.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •