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Thread: Sako finnbear

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    Default Sako finnbear

    HI: I was looking at a SAKO FINNBEAR L61R in 270 SER.#1523113 on another site, the fellow seems to think its rare due to the serial no. he said it looks like only a few hundred were made? He seems to think its rare due to this numbering system? http://www.sako.fi/pdf/datatables/Sa...sNumbering.pdf
    http://www.sako.fi/pdf/datatables/Sa...sNumbering.pdf
    Last edited by pahoghunter; 01-04-2009 at 14:34. Reason: add

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    Well, there were 902 L61R rifles made in that special number sequence so I suppose that is rare. If a gun has some special consideration such as special numbers or anniversary edition or a commemorative, for it to have greater value than the run of the mill guns, it must be be in new or as new condition. Condition is everything. Otherwise it will be worth from about $600 to $1000 depending on how abused it was. An L61 in 270 Winchester is the second most popular caliber for the rifle. They were made form 1962 until 1978 when some changes were made and the action was stamped A-III. The A series of rifles were better from some perspectives than the older L61R's. I've owned over 300 Sako rifles made from 1946 to 2006. I've owned every model and every caliber. I have written a book on Sako rifles, I'm familiar with them.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



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    Default Sako Interest

    Murphy - have a bit of an interest in Sakos especially the short ones, L46, 461s, & A1s. Is copy of your book available? Also what is a never barreled L46 action worth? 17Rem

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    Quote Originally Posted by 17 Rem View Post
    Murphy - have a bit of an interest in Sakos especially the short ones, L46, 461s, & A1s. Is copy of your book available? Also what is a never barreled L46 action worth? 17Rem
    It is unpublished, that cost money. I also need more pictures and when I think the text is done I find something new.

    Is your action in the white? The first L46 I owned was a Mashburn made 218 Mashburn Bee made on a new L46 action. I've never seen one other than that. I've owned several A-I's and one L461 action.

    These rifles are quite a study because there is little written history and being foreign made it is difficult to get info from Finland. Also there is so much misinformation floating around about them. Such as the pre-garcia days guns have better barrels. All Sako barrels were made the same way in the same place for over eighty years. New shop nowadays.

    If you have specific questions, I'll try to help.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



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    Outstanding info, Murphy. When that book gets published, you can bet I'll be waitin' in line to buy a copy! Best of luck with it.

    Jeff

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    Default Sako

    Quote Originally Posted by Murphy View Post
    Well, there were 902 L61R rifles made in that special number sequence so I suppose that is rare. If a gun has some special consideration such as special numbers or anniversary edition or a commemorative, for it to have greater value than the run of the mill guns, it must be be in new or as new condition. Condition is everything. Otherwise it will be worth from about $600 to $1000 depending on how abused it was. An L61 in 270 Winchester is the second most popular caliber for the rifle. They were made form 1962 until 1978 when some changes were made and the action was stamped A-III. The A series of rifles were better from some perspectives than the older L61R's. I've owned over 300 Sako rifles made from 1946 to 2006. I've owned every model and every caliber. I have written a book on Sako rifles, I'm familiar with them.
    Thank you for the info I passed it on, I also noticed that SAKO MAUSER 270 on Gunbroker is still for sale apparently he has a high reserve? thanks BOB

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    Thumbs up any leads for L61R 30-06 bolt?

    Hi Murphy,

    Trying to locate a bolt for Sako L61R 30-06 rifle. What might be the chances of finding one?

    Quote Originally Posted by Murphy View Post
    Well, there were 902 L61R rifles made in that special number sequence so I suppose that is rare. If a gun has some special consideration such as special numbers or anniversary edition or a commemorative, for it to have greater value than the run of the mill guns, it must be be in new or as new condition. Condition is everything. Otherwise it will be worth from about $600 to $1000 depending on how abused it was. An L61 in 270 Winchester is the second most popular caliber for the rifle. They were made form 1962 until 1978 when some changes were made and the action was stamped A-III. The A series of rifles were better from some perspectives than the older L61R's. I've owned over 300 Sako rifles made from 1946 to 2006. I've owned every model and every caliber. I have written a book on Sako rifles, I'm familiar with them.

  8. #8

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    Murphy,

    I recently purchased an as new in the box L61R AV 375 H&H. I want to use original Sako medium scope mounts. Any ideas of where I might be able to find some in Alaska?

    Thanks

    Sean

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    Quote Originally Posted by seant View Post
    Murphy,

    I recently purchased an as new in the box L61R AV 375 H&H. I want to use original Sako medium scope mounts. Any ideas of where I might be able to find some in Alaska?

    Thanks

    Sean
    Sean,

    I have a couple sets of those mounts, prrobably the only ones in the state. These are the mounts with the big thumb screw to quickly detatch them form the rifle. The were made, over the course of about 15 years and acually ended up being four different heights. There lowest will mount a 40 mm scope, the next higher will mount a 50 mm on some rifles. There is a style with a big aperature in the lower solid part and these are slightly taller mediums I believe. Then of course there is the tall mounts which will put a scope up for a giraffe to use. Those with the hole are interesting. Some think they are to se your sights under the scope but the only way that would work is if the scope was a straight tube ojective end, I think the hole was just to reduce weight.
    Functionally the Leupold ringmounts are a great mount and light weight a trim. Also Warne makes a ringmount in two heights that, though not as good as their original design, do work well. The original Warne designed Sako ringmounts were a great mount, better than Saako but they are long discontinued in favor of the easier to manufacture, bulkier mount of today. What do you think original Sako mounts are worth? I'll see if I can post some pictures of them tonite.

    You have a nice rifle there, a good find. There were three completely different configurations of the A-V actioned rifles. I noticed you put the L61R designation in front of the A-V. That likely is stamped on the box and tells me without seeing it or knowing the serial number it is probably an earlier gun. Early eighties vintage, I'd say. The action is marked AV though and there are distinct differences. The L61R and the AV (rn A5) are actualy designations for the actions, not the rifles. During the 80's decade the 375 A-V's were made with a 22.5" barrel and rather thin flat steel, standing rear sight blade, a clean, no sights, 23" barrel and a 24 3/8" barrel with strong heavy duty steel rear sight. I have a 22 1/2" and a 24 3/8" guns, Originally the L61R had only a front barrel mounted sight and the rifle came with the rear Sako aperature. The rather ingenious device was set screw adjusted for 100 yards the we turn the aperature piece over (180 degrees) and it is then set for 200 yards. These sights are in high demand for folks trying to restore their Sako to original configuration and often sell for $150 or more. It is a great target sight.

    Some of the guns imported by Stoeger (all A series guns were Stoeger) came in with the front sight factory mounted but because selling a rifle in America with that aperature was slow, Stoeger had Williams rear sights put on the barrel. These aluminum, black anodized sights look out of place on this all steel European rifle. This was usually done to the carbine length guns as those were more often used with iron sighs in close cover hunting. The presumtion here I guess was long barrels get scopes. I've seen these sights mounted on the Mannlicher stocked carbines and the various carbine length handy rifle with synthetic or walnut stocks. Enjoy your rifle.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



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    Yeah Sean, good find

    Come get some more of them they are piling up

  11. #11

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    Murphy,

    Thanks for the information on my gun. My gun dates to approximately 1985 per the Sako web site. I couldn't be happier with finding this gun. I have wanted one since first seeing one in the early 1980's.

    I am looking for a set of original sako scope mounts, so let me if you have an extra set to sell. I imagine original mounts are worth at least 100 dollars. I want to put a 2.5X8 scope on my rifle. I have it narrowed down to either a Leupold VX3 or the zeiss conquest.

    Thanks,

    Sean

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    Quote Originally Posted by Murphy View Post
    Sean,

    I have a couple sets of those mounts, prrobably the only ones in the state. These are the mounts with the big thumb screw to quickly detatch them form the rifle. The were made, over the course of about 15 years and acually ended up being four different heights. There lowest will mount a 40 mm scope, the next higher will mount a 50 mm on some rifles. There is a style with a big aperature in the lower solid part and these are slightly taller mediums I believe. Then of course there is the tall mounts which will put a scope up for a giraffe to use. Those with the hole are interesting. Some think they are to se your sights under the scope but the only way that would work is if the scope was a straight tube ojective end, I think the hole was just to reduce weight.
    Functionally the Leupold ringmounts are a great mount and light weight a trim. Also Warne makes a ringmount in two heights that, though not as good as their original design, do work well. The original Warne designed Sako ringmounts were a great mount, better than Saako but they are long discontinued in favor of the easier to manufacture, bulkier mount of today. What do you think original Sako mounts are worth? I'll see if I can post some pictures of them tonite.

    You have a nice rifle there, a good find. There were three completely different configurations of the A-V actioned rifles. I noticed you put the L61R designation in front of the A-V. That likely is stamped on the box and tells me without seeing it or knowing the serial number it is probably an earlier gun. Early eighties vintage, I'd say. The action is marked AV though and there are distinct differences. The L61R and the AV (rn A5) are actualy designations for the actions, not the rifles. During the 80's decade the 375 A-V's were made with a 22.5" barrel and rather thin flat steel, standing rear sight blade, a clean, no sights, 23" barrel and a 24 3/8" barrel with strong heavy duty steel rear sight. I have a 22 1/2" and a 24 3/8" guns, Originally the L61R had only a front barrel mounted sight and the rifle came with the rear Sako aperature. The rather ingenious device was set screw adjusted for 100 yards the we turn the aperature piece over (180 degrees) and it is then set for 200 yards. These sights are in high demand for folks trying to restore their Sako to original configuration and often sell for $150 or more. It is a great target sight.

    Some of the guns imported by Stoeger (all A series guns were Stoeger) came in with the front sight factory mounted but because selling a rifle in America with that aperature was slow, Stoeger had Williams rear sights put on the barrel. These aluminum, black anodized sights look out of place on this all steel European rifle. This was usually done to the carbine length guns as those were more often used with iron sighs in close cover hunting. The presumtion here I guess was long barrels get scopes. I've seen these sights mounted on the Mannlicher stocked carbines and the various carbine length handy rifle with synthetic or walnut stocks. Enjoy your rifle.

    As long as this thread is already hyjacked, I also have a Sako AV 375 H&H on the way. Carbine. Barrel length advertised at 20". I've been looking for quite some time and I am excited! I'll be paying attention to the rear sight.
    Thanks Murphy.

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    I guess it became another Sako thread. I'm suprised by the interest in Sakos, I rarely meet anyone in a gun shop or store anymore who is interested. The big push seems to be for the base models for the masses with cheap injection molded handles. It's good to hear folks still trading up to old Sakos.

    The Carbine length guns from Sako came in several forms and calibers. Oddly, the barrel length has been everything from 18" to 20" Generallly magnum calibers were either 19.25" or 20". They were called carbines, handy rifle and an odd configuration called the Battue. It's one of my favorite models and with a long story to explain its existance. There are also the full length stocked versions, or mannlicher style stock. Your 375 is a very practical lenght and will perform yoeman service where a quick handling rifle is needed. Do ya have any more details about your incoming 375. It likely is a mid 80's rifle. Another interesting study is the stock designs that varried over a dozen years or so with this rifle. I'd like to see a picture when it arrives. Thanks for the info.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



  14. #14

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    L46 sidebar
    My Dad bought a 222 L46 at the MC Exchange in WASH DC in 1950. $50., marked down, due to rack wear. They had a Savag DB shotgun for the same price, but a Seaman First Class, that $50 was close to a months pay.

    He still has it. The rifle has a wing safety on the left of the bolt shroud that rotates through about 45 degres up and down, off and on. I have not seen another like it.

    I bought a 22 Hornet L46 from GNG a few years ago that actually shot pretty good, but lloked like a boat gun. It had the little safety on the RH side of the bolt shorud and moved fore and aft. I got traded out of that one somehow.

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    Quote Originally Posted by seant View Post
    Murphy,

    I recently purchased an as new in the box L61R AV 375 H&H. I want to use original Sako medium scope mounts. Any ideas of where I might be able to find some in Alaska?

    Thanks

    Sean
    Sean,

    Here is a link to a L579 with the hole mounts, just so you can see a set in use. It is important to know that these mounts will work for the L579/AII and the L61/AII/AV. They will be too wide for the L461/AI series. The bases are adjustable in width somewhat anbd will accodate both the AII and AV. The Sako dovetail top is a progressive taper. If you lay a straight edge along the side of the milled notch, it is the same taper on either length receiver and starts at the same width at the back where the "U" notch is. The longer receivers will then be wider at the front than the shorter receivers. The short 223 length action, the L461/AI, will be quite a bit narrower than the L61/AIII/AV.

    http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/Vie...Item=134409800
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



  16. #16
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    Murphy,
    I appreciate your interest in viewing it. Not a great picture, but, you can see it at Gunsamerica online, item # 923760884.

    Please tell me what you think.

    Thanks

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