Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: boning big game

  1. #1
    Member pinehavensredrocket's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    wisconsin
    Posts
    759

    Default boning big game

    when i am meat hunting (always!) i usually pull the front and rear quarters with my knife, THEN run my knife between the ribs and pull that rib meat up to the loin. i remove the loin (and rib meat) from the rump up the neck.

    after that, going in from the last rib, pull the tenderloins. there really isn't much left, and i don't have to gut them. last the feet are cut off below the knee. this saves a lot of weight for packing.

    how do you do it?

  2. #2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pinehavensredrocket View Post
    when i am meat hunting (always!) i usually pull the front and rear quarters with my knife, THEN run my knife between the ribs and pull that rib meat up to the loin. i remove the loin (and rib meat) from the rump up the neck.

    after that, going in from the last rib, pull the tenderloins. there really isn't much left, and i don't have to gut them. last the feet are cut off below the knee. this saves a lot of weight for packing.

    how do you do it?
    It's a tradeoff on which bones stay and which go home. We prefer the meat to stay on the ribs, so we take the two sides whole. We leave the rump roast attached to each hindquarter, and remove the bone below the knee on hindquarters and completely bone out the front quarters. Neck roast from each side and remove the backstraps and tenderloin. Liver, heart, kidneys and tongue go home, too. If weight isn't over the top, all the organ fat goes home for rendering, too.

  3. #3
    Member Bighorse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Ketchikan, Alaska
    Posts
    2,032

    Default Rendering

    I've always wondered about that rendering. How do you do that exactly please?

    How do you store it?

    What is it good for?

    Is there any flavor benifits?

    Also......What happens if you try to render the subcutanous fat, like the thick fat over the hind quarters?

    I'd love to use it around the house. I know in bear camp I bring back fat to throw on the fire in the rainforest because it works so great at getting a wet fire up to temperature.

  4. #4

    Default

    I do it just how you described. I haved weighed up sheep, deer, & goat leg bones to see what the saving was & to be ownest it was not worth it in my book. The meat keeps better, less exposed to get dirty, less time if getting dark, & way easier to hang. About the only thing I bone out is moose, but I learned now not to shoot a moose unless transportation is well within eye sight! I usually save the organs like BB, but not familiar with saving the fat? I have a buddy who eats Rocky Mtn. Oysters of all kinds so those go as well. About the only ribs I pack out whole are moose ribs. Fred Flinestone Ribs are great! All other game seems to be to small & has @ least one nice hole in it, so I just cut the meat out & off the rib cage.

    Anyone save stomach/ intestines for tripe or caseings?

  5. #5
    Member icb12's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Kenai
    Posts
    1,038

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pinehavensredrocket View Post
    when i am meat hunting (always!) i usually pull the front and rear quarters with my knife, THEN run my knife between the ribs and pull that rib meat up to the loin. i remove the loin (and rib meat) from the rump up the neck.

    after that, going in from the last rib, pull the tenderloins. there really isn't much left, and i don't have to gut them. last the feet are cut off below the knee. this saves a lot of weight for packing.

    how do you do it?
    We do it pretty much how you described. We also reach in and grab the heart and liver. We also cut as much neck meat as possible, and take the brisket meat.
    Things change though depending on how large the animal is and how far/how challenging the hike is. We just wing it really, but in general.. pretty much how you described.

  6. #6
    Member L. G.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    N'ern S.E. AK
    Posts
    838

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Justin View Post
    Anyone save stomach/ intestines for tripe or caseings?
    BTDT - one time.

    Tlinget buddy of mine was feeling a little anemic. He knew I hunted deer a bit and asked me to bring him some. I ended up getting a deer next to a stream. Gutted deer out. Emptied contents of stomach. Turned it inside out and washed it out like hell. Placed into a zip-loc.

    He was very appreciative - and the organ meat did apparently cure his ailment.

    Took a couple of days for the stink on my hands to go away.

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bighorse View Post
    I've always wondered about that rendering. How do you do that exactly please?

    How do you store it?

    What is it good for?

    Is there any flavor benifits?

    Also......What happens if you try to render the subcutanous fat, like the thick fat over the hind quarters?

    I'd love to use it around the house. I know in bear camp I bring back fat to throw on the fire in the rainforest because it works so great at getting a wet fire up to temperature.
    The organ fat of most animals is real sweet. Rendered it makes a great cooking oil or grease. Best doughnuts I've ever had were cooked in bear grease and best pie crusts ever are made with rendered bear fat. On caribou, moose, elk and deer hunts I always carry waxed paper rolled up. Strip the fine network of fat (actually called lace) off the outside of the paunch, spread it on a bush to air and cool a few minutes, then once it's hard roll it in the waxed paper for the trip home. Better than bacon for wrapping around the outside of a roast before you stick it in the oven.

    Moose and caribou tend not to have a whole bunch of fat compared to beef, but if you save the organ fat you find, you can add that rather than beef and pork fat when you make burger or sausage. My wife made some honest to goodness minced meat one time, which requires suet. We used kidney fat from a black bear, and it was about the best minced meat I've ever had.

    I cut clean, blood-free body fat into chunks and slowly heat it on the stove top without getting it too hot. All the fat liquifies off and leaves behind "crackling" almost like cooked bacon. Pull out the worst of the cracklings from the hot oil, then let it cool and harden. It's best if you heat another pan of water, then drop chunks of the cooled rendered fat into that to remelt it. Stir it around real good to separate the fat from any small impurities, then let it cool and harden on top of the water. Once that's done, break off the fat from the top of the water, and it will be clean, virtually odor free and pure white like Crisco. And if it's clean and white like that, it keeps a long time without going bad.

    Body fat is harder to get clean and work with than organ fat. We tend to use the organ fat for cooking and the body fat for things like waterproofing boots, patch lube in muzzleloaders, waterproofing stuff I make from leather, and more I can't think of right now.

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    NorthWest Alaska
    Posts
    3,638

    Default

    Unless theres sand around, I skin them first. I cut around the hooves to start off each leg I work on. I split the back of the back legs to the ass, then the ass to the chin, then I cut from between the toes, and up the front of the front legs to the front of the neck. There are "lines" on a Caribou to follow in these cuts, you cabn see where the hair lays into each others "Flow". Sometimes I cut off the white under belly if it is nice and white, often on August and September Bulls, so that my wife will have white skin to use on clothing.

    After I skin, I cut the chinup, along the jaw bone and pull out the toung, and cut it off at its base. Then I cut the skull at the back, and twist the head off in a quick motion of turning. Then I lay the throat open and cut down to the sternums front.

    I then start cutting off the straps , starting at the neck, and ending at the pelvid "hip". Im carefull not to cut the sinews that run along the back of the loin, as they can be used as thread, string or traded.

    I cut off eack leg, following thehip on the rear legs.

    Then I cut off the neck by slicing down infront of the "hump' of the shoulders, ending just in front of the sternum.

    Then, I flip it over and make cuts to the brisket, along a series of joints that join the Brisket to the ribs proper. It like a "V" shape cut.
    In removing the brisket, I cut the diaphram, and then cut around and loosen the Colon, making sure its free. Then I grap the trachia/esophagus, and pull the lungs, heart, guts, kidneys and liver,out as one, detaching them as I work back.

    Then I lift the carcass away from the Guts, and seperate out the organs, keeping the kidneys, liver "Bible" rumanets chamber and I stuff the intestinal fats and stomach "Lace" (menses apron) into the intestanal "Termanus", a dead end part of the stomach.

    If I want sausage caseings, I will strip th eguts of food/poo, and put thenm inna bag as well, take them home and prepare them for the job..

    I seperate the ribs from the backbone, and the pelvis too, cutting across the hip bones.
    Sometimes I just skin and Gut and sometimes I just gut them, but it depends on what Im up to, and what I want.

    I save all "possible" skins, 'cause they all have possiblitys...
    Sand is bad for meat, but god for a flat level place for drying skins...I place pebbles along the edges to keep it from rolling, and making bad spots (Maggot nests...yuck!)


    And I show my kids.

    If you can see, befor he took a snack break of hot Liver, afterworking his Caribou, my son Jon has the Briskets and innerds out. Since hes not filling a sled, he dosent need to dissassemble them. He probly set these on our meat rack. If they want to shoot them, I make sure they can work them.
    I see, too, the skin is layed out to freeze, and theres only a stomach and intestines in the pile, because the rest are probly bagged.
    old pix, but relevent to the post.....

    The wife can reduce them with an Ulu or inna pich, a pocket knife, as we cut at the joints and muscle groups. Most knifes I use are 3inch blades. I like Old Hickory's pareing knifes.


    We try to use all we can, its only smart, but all we leave behind are these....


    Im all over Bear grease, but your Caribou fat rendering sounds good , BrownBear. I have to try making it your way.
    Crispy fried fat , like Pork rinds,is good!

  9. #9
    Member pinehavensredrocket's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    wisconsin
    Posts
    759

    Default

    stranger; as usual, your reply was an education more than an answer. a
    chance to see your family working is (like the commercial)--priceless.

    thanks and

    happy trails.
    jh

  10. #10

    Default No holes in those heads...

    What method ('s) of tanning do you use stranger?... not brains that time I see.

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    NorthWest Alaska
    Posts
    3,638

    Default

    Ahhhhhh coffee...good morning!

    Lemme see here....
    Tanning here is done with care, starting with peeling off the hide. I only use a knife to make opening cuts, and then use my hands to seperate the skin from the connective tissues and fats, leaving them on the Meat.It is extreamly Easy to skin an animal while its still warm.

    Then , as the pict shows, I speard it out and dry it carefully. I push/scrape off any left over tissues and meats and I store them untill freeze up, when its time to tan them.
    After storage, we rehydrate them, using fish mash, sourdough or plain water slathered all over the skin...... we dampen them, fold the skin over and let it set overnight.
    We basicly break up the fibers that compose the skin, by folding and squishing the skin. This is done when skin has been rehydrated and has elasticity, or you would crack it if it were too dry.My wife makes theminto a ball and steps onthem for a 1/2 hour or so , squishing it all over, rolling it different ways.
    We scrape them untill they have a smmoth whitish sheen, and are flexable and soft. We scrape and streach out the hide by pushing the scraper in crossing motions and use our hands to work "hard spots" into soft. Some people use their teeth.
    We make a solution from Alder bark, that weve soaked the alsers in, making it reddish in color. This is rbbed into the skin, and it stains a nice dark brownish red. Some times we dont put on the Alder dye, it just depends.
    When its nice and soft, nice and clean, were done there.
    Cut it up and sew it.

    Now rememeber , Im in the "Cool Zone"(arctic, LOL!) and tanning beyojnd that was rather unessarry. We have some clothing here made inthe 50's that is wearable today.
    Most Caribou clothng lasts 2 yaers with regular use.
    Caribou Fawn clothing lasts longer, as it will not shed at all.
    Fur for the Ruffs and trims can be recycled many times.

    The traditional sewing season starts after freeze up.
    This was explained to me that if garmets were made and worn before that, they would ruin in the damp and rain, so after freezeup, the fur is fine for all winter. Besides, during freezup, there alot of activity at home, the ice is thin and you shouls have a good supply of grub up to get you through to daylights return.

    That answer your question?

  12. #12
    Member bushrat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Now residing in Fairbanks from the bush
    Posts
    4,363

    Default

    I ground some moose burger last night and used rump fat from the first moose this fall to grind in with it. Typically don't have to do anything with the rump fat if you get it late enough in season, can just leave it on pelvis piece hanging in meat shed, then after it's freezing bring that in and remove fat in chunks and put in ziplocs outside, bring in as needed and use.

    Stranger, only thing we do different here is we try not to leave anything behind, even antlers. Especially heads, they always go. Antlers are another source of income too, have only ever saved one set to hang up from son's first moose, have used sheds for door handles and coat hangers etc. I suppose if there was no way to transport them, I'd leave antlers, but to me it's like leaving money in the field. Carvers and others pay by the pound, as you likely know, for good antler, has to be separated from skull, doesn't have to be trophy size or anything.

  13. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    NorthWest Alaska
    Posts
    3,638

    Default

    Im with you on saving theantlers all right.
    Fact is we have too many...LOL! Th ewife uses them for her various projects and such, and theres a huge supply out on the tundra, where we laeve them to cure. If I'm in need, I go to them, or cut off usfull piceses we may deem worthy.

    Along Kobuk river, the old men getto gather and sell them...not "Officialy" but thats what happens, so they are channeld along the lines you mentioned.
    Still, theres so many, especcially at the tradtional "Kill" spots that the beach is paved in ice ground antlers and crushed bones, thousands of years of hunting there.... they streak the beach.


    And theres lots of these piles around as well.....

    I admit , we have kept one or two....


    This is one the wife kept and hung over our entrance as a cool decoraton, outside of our small house.
    Not too bad, but I have seen lots.

  14. #14

    Default that about answers it alright...

    Thanks stranger, very informative stuff... I'm just learning about tanning, but find it interesting that no oil is used after the dye... guess that must be a benefit of working hides in the winter only.

    Bushrat, do you tan the same way?

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •