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Thread: legal to sell salmon?

  1. #1

    Default legal to sell salmon?

    a friend of mine is moving and has some red salmon fillets in her freezer and wants to know whether or not she can legally sell these fish, I don't believe that she can but thought I'd ask here. Any advice will be appreciated.

  2. #2
    Member fishNphysician's Avatar
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    NO, not legal.
    "Let every angler who loves to fish think what it would mean to him to find the fish were gone." Zane Grey
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  3. #3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AK-49 View Post
    a friend of mine is moving and has some red salmon fillets in her freezer and wants to know whether or not she can legally sell these fish. Any advice will be appreciated.
    No not legal. And be careful because there are many on this forum that will turn you in if they get the chance. Here are a few quotes from this forum from the past 48 hours:

    1. I don't give a $#%^ what anyone thinks of me I will report anything I see that is against the law, whether it be fish and game violations, drunk drivers or any other crime.

    2. I don't care who it is, I call in every violation I see if I'm in cell range,

    I think she can share it unless it was from dip netting though. In that case, I don't think you can even give it away.

  4. #4
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    She can barter if its subsistence caught, sell it if its commercial caught but there would be paperwork I believe, not sell or barter it if its sport caught. She can give it away.

    and you should probably learn to read wildog
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  5. #5

    Default

    You should not sell sport caught salmon. So, give them to a good friend, or neighbor, or the zoo.

    But here's a question that pertains to this regulaion. When you go to bread and breakfasts and other touristy destinations, they is often someone selling smoked salmon, either from their shelf or out of the refrigerator. While it has never crossed my mind before, how many of these do you think were actually commercially caught? Dang few I would guess. I bet every one of them was dipnetted. It this legal?

  6. #6

    Default bean's cafe

    Beans is always in need of good fish.

    hiker.

  7. #7

    Default Can't sell or barter if

    Quote Originally Posted by T.R. Bauer View Post
    So, give them to a good friend, or neighbor, or the zoo.
    Quote Originally Posted by hiker View Post
    Beans is always in need of good fish.

    hiker.

    You cannot sell or barter sport caught fish, or even use for bait for that matter. But the above are excellent and beneficial suggestions.

    Also consider the Alaska Wildlife Center in Portage (I don't know the exact name)

  8. #8

    Default How about donating...

    the fish to a shelter or something? If they are a non-profit deal, can't you at least get a tax deduction for the donation? Not too practical (for tax purposes) if you only got a small quantity of fish, but at least it's gonna go to a worthy cause (zoo, wildlife center, etc. included).
    Jim

  9. #9
    Member AKFishOn's Avatar
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    How do the zoo donations work, a neighbor has some 2 year old fish which I would like to replace with last year fish and take the 2 year old fish to the zoo.

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    i don't belive it is legal to sell any game meat without a specific license she can give it away but not sell

  11. #11
    Member JediMasterSalmonSlayer's Avatar
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    You can not sell or trade any sport harvested fish.
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  12. #12

    Default No deduction

    Quote Originally Posted by Big Jim View Post
    the fish to a shelter or something? If they are a non-profit deal, can't you at least get a tax deduction for the donation? Not too practical (for tax purposes) if you only got a small quantity of fish, but at least it's gonna go to a worthy cause (zoo, wildlife center, etc. included).
    Jim
    Since sport caught fish has no monetary value, how could you get a deduction? If you have large quantites of left over fish (i.e. freezer burned, or old) maybe consider more catch and release?

  13. #13

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by alaskanfishguides View Post
    Since sport caught fish has no monetary value, how could you get a deduction? If you have large quantites of left over fish (i.e. freezer burned, or old) maybe consider more catch and release?
    You know what's wierd, I wouldn't think so either. I was going to donate to the AK zoo years ago. I spent an hour on the phone with an IRS agent about this. My freezer went out and my reds were thawing and I couldn't use them. After discussion, he said I could write them off at the current value, and write off the gas and whatever else it cost to catch them, and even the campground fees if I had them. I didn't do it because I determined that it might be breaking some state laws and I didn't need the deductions anyway, but I thought it was interesting. It was like 90 pounds of fillets or something like that. It was sad having to get rid of our food, but the bears at the zoo were enjoyed them.
    You might call the IRS just to check.

  14. #14
    Member fishNphysician's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by alaskanfishguides View Post
    If you have large quantites of left over fish (i.e. freezer burned, or old) maybe consider more catch and release?
    BINGO!

    It took about 3 Alaska winters for my brothers and I to figure out we were keeping WAY too many fish for the family each summer. The potential for obscene amounts of wasted fish is one of the pitfalls of living in the land of plenty. Fortunately for us, we knew a guy with a team of sled dogs that took care of the "spring cleaning".

    Sadly the waste starts almost immediately after the first few fish are caught each season. When the fishing is really good, whether dipping or hook/line, it's sometimes difficult to resist the temptation of filling the fishbox with limits just to say everyone got their limit. The amount of fish harvested is simply above and beyond one's personal needs.

    At the end of a long day, it becomes an arduous chore to clean and process all those fish. A boatload of 85 PU sockeye coming ashore at 11 PM is NOT going to receive the care and attention required to salvage the maximum amount of meat from the carcasses. Instead, the attitude quickly shifts to, " Man, let's just get this over with!" Before you know it, the carcasses being pitched back into the river weigh nearly twice the fillets being retained.

    A BIG freezer is another major contributor to the waste. It's as if your job is not done until the stockpile of fish accumulated makes it difficult to close the door. Filling that freezer becomes an end unto itself. What's sad is the number of packages from 2006, 2005, 2004 and beyond that you'll find buried in ice when it comes time to defrost that thing!

    I challenge everyone to count the number of freezer-burnt salmon you pitch this spring... then make a pledge to NOT keep those fish this summer.
    "Let every angler who loves to fish think what it would mean to him to find the fish were gone." Zane Grey
    http://www.piscatorialpursuits.com/uploads/UP12710.jpg
    The KeenEye MD

  15. #15

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fishNphysician View Post
    BINGO!

    It took about 3 Alaska winters for my brothers and I to figure out we were keeping WAY too many fish for the family each summer. The potential for obscene amounts of wasted fish is one of the pitfalls of living in the land of plenty. Fortunately for us, we knew a guy with a team of sled dogs that took care of the "spring cleaning".

    Sadly the waste starts almost immediately after the first few fish are caught each season. When the fishing is really good, whether dipping or hook/line, it's sometimes difficult to resist the temptation of filling the fishbox with limits just to say everyone got their limit. The amount of fish harvested is simply above and beyond one's personal needs.

    At the end of a long day, it becomes an arduous chore to clean and process all those fish. A boatload of 85 PU sockeye coming ashore at 11 PM is NOT going to receive the care and attention required to salvage the maximum amount of meat from the carcasses. Instead, the attitude quickly shifts to, " Man, let's just get this over with!" Before you know it, the carcasses being pitched back into the river weigh nearly twice the fillets being retained.

    A BIG freezer is another major contributor to the waste. It's as if your job is not done until the stockpile of fish accumulated makes it difficult to close the door. Filling that freezer becomes an end unto itself. What's sad is the number of packages from 2006, 2005, 2004 and beyond that you'll find buried in ice when it comes time to defrost that thing!

    I challenge everyone to count the number of freezer-burnt salmon you pitch this spring... then make a pledge to NOT keep those fish this summer.
    Zero. A family of seven, four growing boys that have seemingly bottomless appetites. They are big because I'm 6'6" and my wife is 6'1", they boys are tall and in sports and REALLY eat. We always eat 100% of our red salmon, halibut, rockfish, and caribou. It's one of the great things about living in AK. We all share in the harvest and the work.

    I have known people that hoard way too much though, like a couple with no kids that have 300 pounds of moose, 150 pounds of halibut and 100 pounds of reds, that's this year. I don't see them eating all that, but I'm sure they will share.

    As far as freezer burnt salmon buried, people can prevent waste by better rotating stock and not waste by burying. (speaking from experience here in the past). I think it's more likely to happen with deep freezers as opposed to stand ups.

  16. #16

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ak_powder_monkey View Post
    She can barter if its subsistence caught, sell it if its commercial caught but there would be paperwork I believe, not sell or barter it if its sport caught. She can give it away.

    and you should probably learn to read wildog
    I'll work on the reading part, , but as far as bartering:
    I guess you have to be careful what you barter for? You can't barter for caribou or moose, right?

  17. #17

    Default

    Not sure how we got on the subject of freezer burned or old fish, as AK-49 mentioned simply that his friend was moving and needed a home for frozen fish; sounds like it's in good shape considering the thought of selling it, although illegal.
    I understand what you guys (Doc & AKguide) are saying about keeping too much fish, although I typically don't have much fish, if any, left come springtime in our freezer as I eat fish very often and give it away to friends/family. I often find it difficult to keep fish in reserve thru the winter! I don't have the quantities of fish that go along with dipnetting though as we are not AK residents.
    I will say though that the Alaskans I know that dipnet are very mindful of what they catch and take great care in the processing of those fish (whether it's 11:00 AM or 11:00 PM) as they DO rely on that meat to keep the grocery bill manageable.
    Jim

  18. #18

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wildog View Post
    You know what's wierd, I wouldn't think so either. I was going to donate to the AK zoo years ago. I spent an hour on the phone with an IRS agent about this. My freezer went out and my reds were thawing and I couldn't use them. After discussion, he said I could write them off at the current value, and write off the gas and whatever else it cost to catch them, and even the campground fees if I had them. I didn't do it because I determined that it might be breaking some state laws and I didn't need the deductions anyway, but I thought it was interesting. It was like 90 pounds of fillets or something like that. It was sad having to get rid of our food, but the bears at the zoo were enjoyed them.
    You might call the IRS just to check.

    Well, you might be right. The IRS does not go by Alaska laws. So they probably don't have anything in their regulations for this. So, if someone gives 300 pounds (or whatever) to the zoo, the replacement value may be 3000 dollars. Other have said, "no way, the State of Alaska statute says......." Well, ok that is nice, but the IRS doesn't go by that guys. They have a different rule book to follow.

  19. #19

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fishNphysician View Post
    BINGO!

    It took about 3 Alaska winters for my brothers and I to figure out we were keeping WAY too many fish for the family each summer. The potential for obscene amounts of wasted fish is one of the pitfalls of living in the land of plenty. Fortunately for us, we knew a guy with a team of sled dogs that took care of the "spring cleaning".

    Sadly the waste starts almost immediately after the first few fish are caught each season. When the fishing is really good, whether dipping or hook/line, it's sometimes difficult to resist the temptation of filling the fishbox with limits just to say everyone got their limit. The amount of fish harvested is simply above and beyond one's personal needs.

    At the end of a long day, it becomes an arduous chore to clean and process all those fish. A boatload of 85 PU sockeye coming ashore at 11 PM is NOT going to receive the care and attention required to salvage the maximum amount of meat from the carcasses. Instead, the attitude quickly shifts to, " Man, let's just get this over with!" Before you know it, the carcasses being pitched back into the river weigh nearly twice the fillets being retained.

    A BIG freezer is another major contributor to the waste. It's as if your job is not done until the stockpile of fish accumulated makes it difficult to close the door. Filling that freezer becomes an end unto itself. What's sad is the number of packages from 2006, 2005, 2004 and beyond that you'll find buried in ice when it comes time to defrost that thing!

    I challenge everyone to count the number of freezer-burnt salmon you pitch this spring... then make a pledge to NOT keep those fish this summer.

    Doc,

    The number is zero. None, as in nada. But, with that said, I know it it happens.

  20. #20
    Member fishmaster's Avatar
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    Default No Excuse for wasting Salmon

    We dip on the copper river and Kenai. we usually end up with 60 to 80 reds. we vacum seal about 30 and smoke and jar the rest. We are a family of 4 and none goes to waste. The smoked and jared salmon will last for Years.
    Be sure to follow the guidelines for Pressure cooking. The Alaska Extenson service has some very good information on preserving your catch.
    A CLOSE CALL IS A FREE LESSON

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