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Thread: What kind of fish?

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    Default What kind of fish?

    I was talking to a guy that lives in a village at the foothills of the Brooks Range. When I asked him about ice fishing he mentioned trout and a fish that they call "mud shark", in fresh water. Also he said it is called a "tittliq" (spelling?). Is this a burbot?

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    Member SoggyMountain's Avatar
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    "Burbot are distributed in fresh waters throughout North America and Eurasia southward to about 40 degrees north, and occupy most large clear and glacial rivers and many lakes throughout Alaska. Burbot are known by a number of different names including lawyer, loache, ell pout, methy, lush, lingcod, and mud shark."

    From the ADF&G web site -

    http://www.adfg.state.ak.us/pubs/not...ish/burbot.php
    "...just because we didn't agree with you doesn't mean we didn't have good discussion. It just means you missed it." -JMG-

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Default Mudshark-

    Quote Originally Posted by wildog View Post
    I was talking to a guy that lives in a village at the foothills of the Brooks Range. When I asked him about ice fishing he mentioned trout and a fish that they call "mud shark", in fresh water. Also he said it is called a "tittliq" (spelling?). Is this a burbot?
    That's what they call burbot in the Kotzebue area I think.
    That fish has more names! Eelpout, loche, freshwater ling, lawyer fish, etc.
    Yupiks call them "atgiaq" or "manignaq" I believe.

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    I wont tell you what they call them here in MN. Its not pretty. The ones we have down here taste like crap. Tried them any way they can be made and they just plain taste like rotten mud. There are piles of them on some of the lakes after the snow melts. People just throw them out on the ice for the eagles to eat in the spring. They are NASTY down here.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by kgpcr View Post
    I wont tell you what they call them here in MN. Its not pretty. The ones we have down here taste like crap. Tried them any way they can be made and they just plain taste like rotten mud. There are piles of them on some of the lakes after the snow melts. People just throw them out on the ice for the eagles to eat in the spring. They are NASTY down here.
    I heard that from a guy from MN. Maybe I heard him wrong but he said they burned them in a pile? I wouldn't think they would actually light on fire, but I'm pretty sure that's what he said. Wow I am surprised, because so many people want to catch them and swear they are good eating up here.

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    Wildog
    I have never seen them burned, I have spents days and days on the good eelpout (burbot) lakes and have never seen that. I do see piles and piles of them on the ice. we get many of them fishing walleye. Also burbot love to bite at night as well. Its funny some one will get a fish on and then start to cuss because he can feel the way it fights its a pout. I would love to taste one from AK as they cannot taste the same as down here.

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    Quote Originally Posted by wildog View Post
    I heard that from a guy from MN. Maybe I heard him wrong but he said they burned them in a pile? I wouldn't think they would actually light on fire, but I'm pretty sure that's what he said. Wow I am surprised, because so many people want to catch them and swear they are good eating up here.
    No way can you burn a burbot except by using some other fuel! They've got the LOWEST oil (and omega 3 etc) content of any fish that I've ever seen ...as close to fat-free as any fish can get. But the ones in the Fairbanks area (Tanana River) are great tasting, very delicious, just like ling cod.

    Brian

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    Quote Originally Posted by kgpcr View Post
    Wildog
    I have never seen them burned, I have spents days and days on the good eelpout (burbot) lakes and have never seen that. I do see piles and piles of them on the ice. we get many of them fishing walleye. Also burbot love to bite at night as well. Its funny some one will get a fish on and then start to cuss because he can feel the way it fights its a pout. I would love to taste one from AK as they cannot taste the same as down here.
    Are you Minnesota guys cooking them with the skin on or something like that? You're supposed to fillet the meat off the skin before cooking. You can either cut along either side of the spine, then down to the belly by letting the knife follow the ribs down, then straight aft along the spine and out by the tail, then fillet the meat off the skin. OR, you can put a 16 penny nail through a 2x4, then nail the 2x4 to a tree (or wall) and use that for skinning first ...hang the fish off the nail by punching right through the hollow under the jaw, slice through the skin around the head just behind the gills, then use pliers to strip the skin off ...then fillet the meat off as described. Don't bother gutting anything, but just rinse the meat in cold water before cooking or storing.

    Brian

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    Tanana that is exactly how i cleaned them. skin off and i made sure i stayed away from the belly meat. They just plain taste like crap down here. I have heard a very few people who say they love them but i have yet to see anyone keep one.

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    Member zpoehler's Avatar
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    I've caught and ate numerous pout in MN, mostly from Lake of the Woods...we boiled the fillet's in 7up or Mt. dew and they tasted great (poor mans lobster), the mistake most people make when eating eel pout is thinking about what they look like when they eat them.

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    Default MN pout...

    are some of the tastiest pout around. My wife isn't much of a fish fan, and even she can't get enough of the pout when they're a boilin'.

    As far as guys tossing them out on the ice, thankfully that practice is slowing down. Eelpout are a great indicator of the well being of a lake. Nothing irritates me quite as much as seeing pout being wasted.

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    In Kotzebue we call them titaliq. (tih-TAH-lik). They are good eating. Sometimes people compare it to halibut. They sure are ugly. Good place to catch them is in the mouth of the Noatak River near the second slough. That's where I caught this one.....

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    Quote Originally Posted by tundratantrum View Post
    In Kotzebue we call them titaliq. (tih-TAH-lik). They are good eating. Sometimes people compare it to halibut. They sure are ugly. Good place to catch them is in the mouth of the Noatak River near the second slough. That's where I caught this one.....
    Awesome picture, love it. I'll remember where to go for when I work up there, hopefully in the spring.

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    i've heard the poormans lobster thing before, i tried it and by golly, they taste just like boiled fish. I like them breaded and fried. once you get past the ugly, they are GREAT here in the U.P. anyways

  15. #15

    Thumbs up Good Eats!

    Quote Originally Posted by zpoehler View Post
    I've caught and ate numerous pout in MN, mostly from Lake of the Woods...we boiled the fillet's in 7up or Mt. dew and they tasted great (poor mans lobster), the mistake most people make when eating eel pout is thinking about what they look like when they eat them.
    I grew up fishing Lake of the Woods, too, and I also used to throw all my burbot on the ice. I didn't realize what I was wasting until I moved up here, and learned how to cook them. Your one of the few people that cook them up that way....It works great. Don't forget to clarify some garlic butter for dippin'! Adding about a half bottle of your favorite Pinot Noir with the water also works good.

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    Member akfishfool's Avatar
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    Default when I was groing up in Maine

    We called them Cusk. They are a true freshwater cod, and taste great in chowder. we would often spend more time going after them than the salmon or trout.

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