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Thread: Which GPS?

  1. #1

    Default Which GPS?

    I have been wanting to get a GPS but have no idea which model to get. Mainly want it for 4 wheeling snowmachining and hunting. Mainly so I can keep from getting lost. On a rainy or low clouds day up here it's easy to get turned around and lose your sense of direction. Anyone have any reccomendations. Thanks

  2. #2
    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Default

    I have been real impressed with the Garmin etrex Legend C. I have two of them that I take on my float trips. Very nice units and battery life is good in them. Runs on AA's. I suggest the Energizer lithiums as they last longer. Best thing about this gps is that it is easy to use. Below is link. This is a good place to buy from. Used them a few times myself.

    http://www.thegpsstore.com/Garmin-eT...-P1598C82.aspx

    Below is a handlebar mount for the Garmin etrex. I use it on my Ally canoe frame. Works great. Should fit atv handlebars, but if not, there are some others made for this purpose. Lots of accesories since this is such a popular unit.

    http://www.rei.com/product/658740?cm...:referralID=NA

    Also, go to the "Gear" forum and put "gps" or "garmin" in the search box up top. Lots of old post that may offer insights.



    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  3. #3
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    Default Garmin

    I'm really fond of Garmin, but it kind of depends on how much you want to spend. You can get a good reliable GPS for under $200 like the eTrex Vista or Legend, or you can spend a bit more and get the GPS Map or get the Colorado or Oregon. I have the Garmin Colorado 400T and absolutley love it. Check out there website and compare different GPS's and see the different characteristics of each one.

    https://buy.garmin.com/shop/shop.do?cID=143

    Good Luck!

    Johnny Freeze

  4. #4
    Member H_I_L_L_B_I_L_L_Y's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Garmin

    Garmin map60csx. Hasnt failed me yet.

  5. #5
    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Garmin

    Garmin GPSMAP 76CSx !!! Similar to the 60CSx, but way better

    If you don't need the barometric altimeter and electronic compass, then go with the GPSMAP 76Cx and you'll save a few bucks but still get the big color screen with a waterproof (floating) marine grade handheld. Works great for backcountry and vehicle mount as well.

    The eTrex series is cheaper and they are very small. This may be nice for packing trips, but isn't so nice for trying the read the tiny little screen. I also have an eTrex Vista that was my primary for awhile, but is now a backup. It's just too handicapped for use via any motorized vehicle.

    As for the Oregon & Colorada series, these are more like Palm PC computers than a rugged GPS receiver. Not suggested for a first-time or casual user. A friend of mine got the Oregon last summer and it isn't fairing very well with the rigors of actual field use. The "real" GPS receivers are much more rugged to stand up to the outdoors.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

  6. #6
    Member PatrickH's Avatar
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    Default Compass

    If you hunt in thick brushy areas the built-in compass can be a nice feature. I was hunting and a cloud moved in cutting visibility to about 100 yards. The area was so thick that I could not walk a straight line long enough to get a bearing on which way north was. I ended up taking out my scout compass to get the bearing and found my way out. You should always have a compass and know how to use it.
    I would be cautious about anything with a touch screen when it gets really cold. The lcd screens we use at work will sometimes snap just going from warm to cold. I would rather use something with buttons when on the snowmachine.

  7. #7

    Default MAP76cs also..

    My vote goes to the Garmin MAP76cs (wish I had the X)
    I have a mount on the handle bars of the wheeler and a mount on the dash of the sled..
    You can still watch the screen while riding and the controls can be used with gloves on. Some of the smaller units with the same features you can't operate with gloves on.
    Good Luck

  8. #8
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    Default Garmin...

    Garmin GPSmap 60CS; is what I have, it might be a couple of years older but you can not go wrong with the ones which now have replaced the map 60 series. Good battery life, easy to use, user friendly...etc...and what everyone else has already said about the Garmin.

  9. #9

    Default

    Thanks for the reply's. I'll probably get the etrex, it should to the job. I do carry a compass, learned that lesson the hard way.

  10. #10
    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    The etrex is a very capable and weather resistant unit. I am sure you will be happy with it. I have used one for four years on our arctic float trips. Easy to use and never let me down.
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  11. #11

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    I will post one more for the 60Csx. It is a great tool. The electronic compass is a must. Otherwise you have to be moving to get a heading. Of course always carry your trusty mag compass.

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    Default

    As far as gps's i have had Magellan for several years but I recently became sold on Delorme. The pn-40 rocks! It has maps, many different kinds to download (satelite, topo, NOAA, etc). Tide charts, altimeiter, barometer, and compass. The pn-40 or pn-20 is worth a look. It will do anything you want!

  13. #13

    Thumbs up Garmin 530HCX

    This Garmin is great if you hunt with friends you can see there location on your unit. It has the new hi-sesivtivity reciever that never loses track of satelites in the densest forests. Has a 5 watt fmrs radio, a real compass, real altimiter, and a weather radio. it is by far the best GPS i've ever owned. Costs $356 at buydig.com. If you want to use it in your car, it does turn by turn navigation with map software.
    Frank
    Alaska Wildrose Charters and Cabins
    www.wildroselodge.com

  14. #14

    Default Garmin 60Csx

    I herd about this model & when the guy in ther store told me it would pick up satalites inside the store I did not believe him. Sure enough in the center of the store it locked on them. In the field it has proven to beat out the etrex. I hunt a lot on Afognak in the thick timber & it is the only GPS that I know thus far to stay locked or pick up satalites under the thick canopy. It has some cool features a swell. Worth every penny! I believe they are about 100 bucks less these days. Technology changes so fast. I am not familar with the 76Csx, but I think if the , model ends with the Csx it has the beefed up attena.

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    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    Default Garmin Rino: peer to peer positioning

    Agree with jfreeze - prices will dictate some choices. You can get reliable basic features for hundreds less.

    Garmin Rino has the peer-to-peer positioning, mentioned by profishguide, is a feature worth considering. It gives two or more individuals the ability to update each other's position on the GPS screen simply by pressing the transmit button - and could be useful to hunters, snowmachiners...

  16. #16
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    Default

    garmin 60csx, worked great...until i lost it. if i can't find it, am looking at the Garmin Oregon 400t.

    also depends on how much you want to spend on it. if not wanting to throw down 4-5 big ones, the eTrex should do you right.

  17. #17
    Supporting Member bullbuster's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Garmin Oregon 400c

    Some of this is posted in the gear forum. I bought the 400c, preloaded w/ the marine charts. I have downloaded the topos for the entire NW, including Alaska. I got the 400c as the marine charts alone are $400 if purchased separately.
    I am not a GPS expert, having owned only one other unit. I got 3 of REI $100 gift certificates which took the bite out of the $600 price tag.

    It is simple to use.

    Very fast satellite acquisition.

    I have done 3 cold tests. One was clipped to my belt for 5 hours at minus 5. I also left it outside for 8 hours. It was minus 10 to minus 12. It started up immediately. Found the sats fast as usual. The touch screen never hesitated while scrolling.

    It will accept an SD card (mine is 2 GB) Lots of info to stuff in there! You can even load your own photos for the background or just to show hunting buddies pictures of prior hunts.

    It seems very viewable in the sunlight, though the summer sun may be different, as this was discussed in some forums as a minus. No problems yet. (knock on wood)

    It's waterproof.

    Battery usage is 10 times better than the old GPS III+ I have. It would use 4 AA in 8-10 hours. The Oregon gave me 20 hours on 2 AA batts.

    As they improve the operating system it is downloadable from the net.


    Really too many features to go thru them all.

    I have yet to do the "drop it down a mountain" test, But I am sure that day is coming. I just hope it isn't still in my pocket when that day comes.

    So far, I am impressed with the unit. Glad I got it.
    Live life and love it
    Love life and live it

  18. #18
    Member JoeJ's Avatar
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    Any Garmin is better than no Garmin. Myself I run the 76CSX and like it. I would seriously suggest only purchasing mapping Garmin GPS’s that have some form of SD card slot, so you can install custom GPS maps of the area you’ll be travelling in. There’s a lot of excellent free material out there on the web. Here are a couple sites you might find useful:

    http://forums.groundspeak.com/GC/index.php?act=idx
    http://www.ibycus.com/
    http://www.gpsfiledepot.com/
    http://www.miscjunk.org/

  19. #19
    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoeJ View Post
    Any Garmin is better than no Garmin...

    http://forums.groundspeak.com/GC/index.php?act=idx
    Hmmm, do we have another Geocacher here?

    Agreed with the SD card slot, no matter what unit you buy.

    Also wanted to add a note about batteries. The new Garmin handheld GPSr only use 2 AA batteries (the old ones used 4) and the run time on 2 is at least twice as long as the run time on the old ones with 4 batteries. I exclusively use Energizer NiMH 2600mAh rechargeables in mine. I've got 12 batteries with 4 in my digital camera, 2 in each GPSr (76CSx & Vista), and 4 in the spare battery pouch on my camera case. I've run my 76 on 2 batteries for nearly 12 hours per day for two days before needing to change them. Mileage with single use alkalines is considerably less. For cold weather, you'll also want to invest in a set of lithium AA batteries. They have a decade long shelf life and are not effected by the cold, so they make perfect backup batteries.

    On your snowmachine, you might consider getting a Garmin mounting bracket. It is possible to wire a handheld into a snowmachine's electrical system, but it involves installing a voltage rectifier and quality voltage regulator. Even if you just run off of batteries, you'll find great benefit in placing an adhesive thumb warmer on the back of the mounting bracket. It will keep the GPSr warm enough to extend battery life and keep the LCD screen from experiencing cold fade. Especially important in sub-zero temperatures.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

  20. #20
    Member JoeJ's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JOAT View Post
    Hmmm, do we have another Geocacher here?
    Never got into that activity but when I first got into GPS this site educated me some in a lot of ways relative to GPS usage and the other sites I referenced are sites started up by members of the Groundspeak forms site who are into making maps. The free maps are just as good and in most cases better than a lot of commercial maps out there costing $100 or more.

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