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Thread: Getting materials to the cabin?

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    Member doug1980's Avatar
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    Default Getting materials to the cabin?

    I was curious as to how one gets the lumber, tin, and other building materials to the site of your cabin? Lets say the cabin will be near Tok what kind of expense would one be looking at to get all the materials there? I'm sure the logs for the outside walls are taken on site, but it seems like it could get pretty expensive just hauling materials. I'm contemplating buying some land and building a small seasonal cabin so I'm trying to get an idea what all is invovled and how expensive.

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    make sure that you check out the land and make sure there are trees big enough to build a cabin with. Otherwise you might be building a stick cabin. I know lots of guys that have built some really nice stick cabins. Most of the time we take the building material in, in the winter on snowgo or in the summer with a boat if there is river acess. How big where you thinking of making it?

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    Member doug1980's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by swapdonkey View Post
    make sure that you check out the land and make sure there are trees big enough to build a cabin with. Otherwise you might be building a stick cabin. I know lots of guys that have built some really nice stick cabins. Most of the time we take the building material in, in the winter on snowgo or in the summer with a boat if there is river acess. How big where you thinking of making it?
    Well would love a 900-1,000 sg/ft but I know that's wishfull thinking so about half that. I helped a friend build one that was 1,200 sg/ft back home, but doubt I could do it on my own. Would really like road access or at least trail access but again, wishfull thinking.

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    Only way is canoe, road, or plane, or I guess you could sled them in.

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    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    I am hauling in materials and have been for almost a year now. You don't say what access that the area has. I will assume that it has no road access. Snow machine with a freight sled is absolutely the cheapest and fastest. We hauled 4000# in a couple hours with ATV's. It would have been faster with snowmachines.

    Your OP says Elmendorf. The logistics of working 5 and 2 make Tok a long drive that eats up your building time. 4 on and 3 off would be much easier. I am over 3 hours out and it really makes for a long weekend to drive, haul, build, FISH and return. We leave as early Friday nght as possible and return late Sunday. You have about 2 months when the light does not matter much. Early and later it becomes a factor. Hauling in VIA boat is not too bad, if you like handling the materials more.

    Count the times you have to pick up and manually move that piece of wood just to get it to the building location.

    If you know when you will be able to haul, use a local dealer and have them drop the materials right where you can haul them in. I know a guy in Glennallen that can get you a quote.

    If you have any specific questions, feel free to PM me.

    Mike

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    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    There is a building supply outfit in Tok. There are two in Delta. Or were..I haven't been up there in two years. Fairbanks isn't that far and has everything you need.

    I am biased. I own a small town buidling materials/hardware store. Keeping the money local is the best way to go if they are competitive on service and pricing. Many times when you figure out your fuel, wear and tear on your vehicles, and your time, it is cheaper to just pay a little more locally for materials. All these suppliers have supplies coming in weekly. If they don't have what you need it should not be more than a week to get it. If you plan accordingly that shouldn't be a problem.

    I am not a sponsor of this site so I really can't say more without sounding like I am advertising
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

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    Member COtoAK's Avatar
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    1stimestar has a video that she posted that I think that you would be interested in:
    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ad.php?t=44699
    It's in this thread and the vid is on youtube.
    That's how her friend got all their materials out to their property.
    Lurker.

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    Default Snowmachines with sled

    Quote Originally Posted by doug1980 View Post
    I was curious as to how one gets the lumber, tin, and other building materials to the site of your cabin? Lets say the cabin will be near Tok what kind of expense would one be looking at to get all the materials there? I'm sure the logs for the outside walls are taken on site, but it seems like it could get pretty expensive just hauling materials. I'm contemplating buying some land and building a small seasonal cabin so I'm trying to get an idea what all is invovled and how expensive.
    .

    By far the best way is by snowmachines. I built a cabin about 8 miles off the highway and used freight sled to bring material in. I also milled all my dimensional lumber on site. My place is about 1100 sq ft. If you weld, you can build a freight sled or have it built. Depending on your trail terrain you can easily move 1000lbs at a time of lumber. You will spend alot of time on the trail if you are far in.
    The beauty of moving with sleds is that the lumber gets there perfectly clean and right to the site.

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    I built a 16x20 a few years back, using natural logs from the site. The site is 70 miles, one way, into the Alaska Range. Fortunatley for me a friend a few miles downriver was also building, so we went together on a knodwell, with trailer, and had a large load hauled in in the winter. That load consisted of mostly things that were going to be really tough to get in by snowmachine--things like, a wood stove, long pieces of roofing tin, creosote poles for pilings, windows, etc.

    After that initial load everything else has gone in by snowmachine and sled, including 16 foot t&g, and 2x10, for the roof structure, rolls of fiberglass, deck lumber, metalbestos stove pipe, etc. It takes a lot of trips, and helps if you have friends with snomachines and sleds.

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