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Thread: prop guard

  1. #1
    Member akriverrat's Avatar
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    Default prop guard

    what gaurd do you guys use or prefer? the ring or the little skid plate thats mounted to the skag? i had a skid plate one on my 30 horse with my 14 foot smokercraft. with the high speed impacts though well im sure it helped some

  2. #2
    Member moose-head's Avatar
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    Default

    The ring is nice for keeping fishing lines and other junk out of your prop.

  3. #3

    Default Prop Guard

    The best and strongest prop guard I've found is this.

    http://www.rockhoppermotorguard.com/

    The ROCK HOPPER MOTOR GUARD is made of welded stainless steel. It slips over the skeg and protects it, as well as the prop and lower unit(gear case) from rock and debris impact; It is only available for up to 35 hp motors however. This is NOT a cheap cast junk unit ! They are also sold at Cabelas , they just cost more from the retailer (but ship faster).
    Remember that the motor shouldn't be locked down,or it can't move under impact.
    " Americans will never need the 2nd Amendment, until the government tries to take it away."

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  4. #4
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    Default Prop Guard

    this type of prop guard is the best I have used this stile for over 30 years
    you need to do a little motor work on the out board, so it can come up when you hit something an also so it don't lock up when you do hit the rock/log as for most of the time when this happends you need the motor in the water not up out of the water siting high an dry

    SID

  5. #5
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    Default rockhopper....

    Another rockhopper user, here. Very protective of the lower end and prop. My choice.

  6. #6
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    Default Rock Hopper

    Just to keep it sthight the guard I use for the last few years, I don't think it will help the prop vert much it potects the scage more and the prop takes a very large beating on the rocks an logs
    SID

  7. #7
    Moderator Alaskacanoe's Avatar
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    Default cavitation on turns

    I have been talking to a fellow that is having cavitation problems when making turns with the rock hopper on..
    He runs a skinny river, and has to make abrupt turns. he said the prop gains plenty of purchase during straight run, but he loses all purchase as soon as he turns..
    With the rock hopper off, and he does not have this problem..
    What do you guys think he can do?
    Max
    When you come to a fork in the trail, take it!

    Rentals for Canoes, Kayaks, Rafts, boats serving the Kenai canoe trail system and the Kenai river for over 15 years. www.alaskacanoetrips.com

  8. #8
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    Default tight turns

    that will happen on tight turns, needs to drop motor down some or reduce speed on turns drop the ENG. a 1/2 inch at a time till he is happy with it , sounds like he has razed his motor up on a transom extemder or has a lift on it is that true.
    SID

  9. #9
    Moderator Alaskacanoe's Avatar
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    Default rock hopper

    yes he raised his motor , but like I said,,
    If he removes the rock hopper,it does not cavitate on turns.. with the rock hopper on,,it does..
    Why?
    When you come to a fork in the trail, take it!

    Rentals for Canoes, Kayaks, Rafts, boats serving the Kenai canoe trail system and the Kenai river for over 15 years. www.alaskacanoetrips.com

  10. #10
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    Default Cavitation

    When you add anything to the motor it is not going to help the water to move smoth you loose some speed [most don't care just want power, don't care about top speed ] air gets under the plate an guess what the prop grabs it, an the way to stop it is drop the eng down 1/2 inch at a time till it stops. I have a the alaskan special 19 ft. Lift an 15 hp i live with that problem, an as to his problen when you do this fast moverment with the canoe it will twist a lot an you will break the seat suports, an riverts in the seat this is real it will happend, in small rivers you are not going fast just a little over head way speed, you can do it but you will pay the price as time goes on [new canoe] i have gone through 1 canoe so far [getting old] don't think i will need any more,
    sid

  11. #11
    Moderator Alaskacanoe's Avatar
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    Default twisting

    Now that is good information, so if one turns the motor quickly they are going to add alot of torque and start to loosen the rivets.
    Good points.
    I have explained to some that cavitation and no cavitation can mean the difference of less than an inch,..... break the waters surface and add air to the prop area in anyway ...will result in the inability of the prop to compress the water and screw its way forward.

    Thanks all for your for your great comments and understanding..

    Max
    When you come to a fork in the trail, take it!

    Rentals for Canoes, Kayaks, Rafts, boats serving the Kenai canoe trail system and the Kenai river for over 15 years. www.alaskacanoetrips.com

  12. #12
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    Default Prop guard

    1/2 inch will make a differance. Like I said most people live with a little they want the power on lakes an big rivers an most people slow down a lot on small streams as things happen a lot faster. when you do slow down the water level comes up on the back end of canoe an you don't have the problem like you do when you are runing wide open [a canoe is not a speed boat]

    SID

  13. #13
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    Talking rockhopper all the way

    I run a rock hopper on my 16 grumman with a 9 1/2 evinrude. Lets say this i hit under water logs, rocks, all kinds of stuff and in 3 years i only sheared off i prop. definately has paid off.

  14. #14
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    Default rock hopper

    WISO 67 I have sent you a PM

    SID

  15. #15

    Default Rockhopper looks bulky

    Just looking at the pictures on the web, the Rockhopper looks really bulky and stiff. I typically run a single rod (hand made) that follows the skeg and extends below the prop and out the back a few inches. Add some rubber to the rod where it passes along the motor housing for added padding and you have a guard with minimal added drag and some "spring" to it to help absorb the impacts. You also get a really good "feel" of the bottom so you can adjust the position of the motor with the lift to exactly what is there. Small mods can be made to help it cut weeds as you hit them so they don't build up on the leading edge of the engine housing. No problems with cavitation. You give up a little in that you could get unlucky and catch the edge of a rock, but that is a slight risk you take. I've never sheared off a blade (knock on wood....).

    I've used the ring before and it wasn't too bad as far as prop protection. It did create a lot more drag and in my opinion, and added a lot of wear to the drive parts of the engine. Small pea-sized gravel would periodically get inside the ring and briefly wedge between the prop and ring, causing a lot of added torque to the drive shaft and gearing. Weeds were terrible for this though.

    The big thing when running in water with obstacles is to have the engine balanced and the tilt released. You want the engine to bounce up on the slightest impact. If you have it locked, all the force of an imact will be taken by the motor. If you have the tilt angle balanced just right, you should be able to reach back and cause the engine to tilt up with only a slight effort when at speed. This will help to take a lot of the shock of the impact out of the motor.

  16. #16
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    Default prop guard

    you can also make the tilt control to be manual, that way it dont lock up when it bounce's, so it will go back down instead of locking up when you hit a object,
    you need to put a brace on the scag so this rod you are putting on don't vibrate an break off, metal fatige, an yes it will cause drage but you don't feel it most people have lots of power on the canoe

  17. #17

    Default Good catch...

    Quote Originally Posted by Sid View Post
    you can also make the tilt control to be manual, that way it dont lock up when it bounce's, so it will go back down instead of locking up when you hit a object,
    you need to put a brace on the scag so this rod you are putting on don't vibrate an break off, metal fatige, an yes it will cause drage but you don't feel it most people have lots of power on the canoe
    You are correct. I forgot to mention the brace attachment at the bottom end of the built on skag. I belive the ones we use have some amount of float to them so it isn't a rigid attachment point, but have used it both ways with success.

  18. #18

    Default Photos of single rod prop guard?

    Do you have any photos of your single rod prop guard you would be willing to share?




    Quote Originally Posted by anchskier View Post
    Just looking at the pictures on the web, the Rockhopper looks really bulky and stiff. I typically run a single rod (hand made) that follows the skeg and extends below the prop and out the back a few inches. Add some rubber to the rod where it passes along the motor housing for added padding and you have a guard with minimal added drag and some "spring" to it to help absorb the impacts. You also get a really good "feel" of the bottom so you can adjust the position of the motor with the lift to exactly what is there. Small mods can be made to help it cut weeds as you hit them so they don't build up on the leading edge of the engine housing. No problems with cavitation. You give up a little in that you could get unlucky and catch the edge of a rock, but that is a slight risk you take. I've never sheared off a blade (knock on wood....).

    I've used the ring before and it wasn't too bad as far as prop protection. It did create a lot more drag and in my opinion, and added a lot of wear to the drive parts of the engine. Small pea-sized gravel would periodically get inside the ring and briefly wedge between the prop and ring, causing a lot of added torque to the drive shaft and gearing. Weeds were terrible for this though.

    The big thing when running in water with obstacles is to have the engine balanced and the tilt released. You want the engine to bounce up on the slightest impact. If you have it locked, all the force of an imact will be taken by the motor. If you have the tilt angle balanced just right, you should be able to reach back and cause the engine to tilt up with only a slight effort when at speed. This will help to take a lot of the shock of the impact out of the motor.

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