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Thread: Firearms Cleaning

  1. #1

    Default Firearms Cleaning

    Note: I tried the Search feature but came up empty!

    A while back, there were a number of posts on a cleaning product that "foamed" and apparently did a thorough job with only one or two patches or applications.

    Could someone list this product one more time? Would like to buy some soon.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    I believe there are several foaming bore cleaners. Many people like Wipe Out. You could try www.midwayusa.com nd search for "bore foam": http://www.midwayusa.com/Search/Defa..._1-2-4_8-16-32

    If you use the "Advanced search" feature, here are a few threads that pop up on Google search of AOD forums:

    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/showthread.php?t=30110

    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/showthread.php?t=14361
    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ead.php?t=1566

    Good luck.

  3. #3
    Member pinehavensredrocket's Avatar
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    i have used foaming cleaners but have not been overly impressed with them. besides cleaning the bore, a bore-brush smoothes the surface actually improving it for the next shot.

    barrel break-in proceedures are designed to that end, and the results improve the "smoothness" to allow multiple shots.

    in competition (sniper) with my .308 it is commom to fire upwards of 40rds (sometimes a lot more) w/o cleaning. accuracy for this kind of shooting requires a VERY good bore!

    good luck with short cuts and

    happy trails.
    jh

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    I recall the discussion you reference, and I participated in it. The foam cleaner that you're probably thinking about is called "Wipe-out". Does that sound familiar?

  5. #5
    Member pinehavensredrocket's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doc View Post
    I recall the discussion you reference, and I participated in it. The foam cleaner that you're probably thinking about is called "Wipe-out". Does that sound familiar?
    hi doc; this product is by "outers-gunslick" and just say foaming bore cleaner. it is listed as a one step cleaner.

    i used it on an old savage '99 in .250 savage. it did remove copper, but the bore still had to be scrubbed with barnes cr10 as the patches stayed green.

    it may be o.k. in certain applications, but usually the easy way doesn't work for me.

    happy trails.
    jh

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by pinehavensredrocket View Post
    hi doc; this product is by "outers-gunslick" and just say foaming bore cleaner. it is listed as a one step cleaner.

    i used it on an old savage '99 in .250 savage. it did remove copper, but the bore still had to be scrubbed with barnes cr10 as the patches stayed green.

    it may be o.k. in certain applications, but usually the easy way doesn't work for me.

    happy trails.
    jh
    Wipeout is a very effective copper remover. In bores that don't copper foul much, it can remove copper in one application. In other barrrels it may take 2 or 3 and in bores that see heavy fouling it may take 7 or 8. In my Sako, which I brke in, it takes one application. In my old Ruger M77, it takes about 7-8. Also, Wipeout is not harmful to the bore like amonia based cleaners can be.

    Something to try is to clean your bore with another product until you think the copper is gone, then soak it for a few hours or over night with Wipeout. You'll likely see more blue on the patch after soaking with wipeout.

    There are some old threads on this subject, check them out.

    Cheers,

    Mark

  7. #7
    Member pinehavensredrocket's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MontanaRifleman View Post
    Wipeout is a very effective copper remover. In bores that don't copper foul much, it can remove copper in one application. In other barrrels it may take 2 or 3 and in bores that see heavy fouling it may take 7 or 8. In my Sako, which I brke in, it takes one application. In my old Ruger M77, it takes about 7-8. Also, Wipeout is not harmful to the bore like amonia based cleaners can be.

    Something to try is to clean your bore with another product until you think the copper is gone, then soak it for a few hours or over night with Wipeout. You'll likely see more blue on the patch after soaking with wipeout.

    There are some old threads on this subject, check them out.

    Cheers,



    Mark
    thanks for the tip mark; i must not have been using the right product. will give it a try.
    jh

  8. #8
    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pinehavensredrocket View Post
    barrel break-in proceedures are designed to that end, and the results improve the "smoothness" to allow multiple shots.
    John, I have a rifle I'm going to break-in here shortly and am wondering what your procedures were. I was going to go shoot 1, run patches until they come out clean, and repeat. I know this is beating a dead horse, but I just want to do it right.....Sorry....kinda a thread-jack...

  9. #9

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    I've used Wipe Out for a couple of years, and it's always worked great.

    My current can of Wipe Out is more watery, regardless of how much I shake it up, and it has a more distinct ammonia smell than what I've used in the past. I don't know if it had been stored improperly, or if the formula has changed, or what.

    I recently tried the Break Free foam cleanser for the first time, and it seemed to work OK.

    I have a can of the Outer's product, but i haven't tried it yet..

  10. #10
    Member pinehavensredrocket's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hunt_ak View Post
    John, I have a rifle I'm going to break-in here shortly and am wondering what your procedures were. I was going to go shoot 1, run patches until they come out clean, and repeat. I know this is beating a dead horse, but I just want to do it right.....Sorry....kinda a thread-jack...
    hi, and thanks for the question...... we were taught ( obermeyer barrels) to swab a new bore dry.
    fire a shot, then clean with a good solvent until the patches come out white.
    repeat.
    after 5 shots clean with jb paste, then solvent, then dry patch.
    repeat for 5 more shots, finish with the jb paste, then solvent, dry patch then use an oily (very little) patch and your ready to put it away.

    with my sniper rifle i can shoot upwards of 40 rds w/o degrading accuracy.

    in competition our groups were measured to the 1/8", most shot 1/2 minute....many 1/4 minute.

    ** some shooters use a tight fitting patch and a jag........i like using a bronze brush wrapped with a patch. it will wear out a brush (or two) to go through the "break in" but when finished it is smoother than custom barrel makers can make it.

    **warning--some solvents should not be mixed (use only one product at a time ) as a chemical reaction can "frost" your bore. it's a permanent roughness that can't be fixed. if you ever buy a sniper rifle it may be for sale for that reason.

    happy trails.
    jh

  11. #11
    Member JoeJ's Avatar
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    Kreiger barrels had a good piece on barrel break-in and why. Once I became "educated" a little on the subject I broke in all my match grade barrels and copper fouling has never been a problem and cleans up in a hurry after a range session/match. Here's basically how this barrel maker explained it:

    With any premium barrel that has been finish lapped such as your Krieger Barrel, the lay or direction of the finish is in the direction of the bullet travel, so fouling is minimal. This is true of any properly finish-lapped barrel regardless of how it is rifled. If it is not finish-lapped, there will be reamer marks left in the bore that are directly across the direction of the bullet travel. This occurs even in a button-rifled barrel as the button cannot completely iron out these reamer marks.

    Because the lay of the finish is in the direction of the bullet travel, very little is done to the bore during break-in, but the throat is another story. When your barrel is chambered, by necessity there are reamer marks left in the throat that are across the lands, i.e. across the direction of the bullet travel. In a new barrel they are very distinct; much like the teeth on a very fine file. When the bullet is forced into the throat, copper dust is released into the gas which at this temperature and pressure is actually a plasma. The copper dust is vaporized in this gas and is carried down the barrel. As the gas expands and cools, the copper comes out of suspension and is deposited in the bore. This makes it appear as if the source of the fouling is the bore when it is actually for the most part the new throat. If this copper is allowed to stay in the bore, and subsequent bullets and deposits are fired over it; copper which adheres well to itself, will build up quickly and may be difficult to remove later. So when we break in a barrel, our goal is to get the throat polished without allowing copper to build up in the bore. This is the reasoning for the "fire-one-shot-and-clean" procedure.

    Barrels will vary slightly in how many rounds they take to break in because of things like slightly different machinability of the steel, or steel chemistry, or the condition of the chambering reamer, etc. . . For example a chrome moly barrel may take longer to break in than stainless steel because it is more abrasion resistant even though it is the same hardness. Also chrome moly has a little more of an affinity for copper than stainless steel so it will usually show a little more "color" if you are using a chemical cleaner. (Chrome moly and stainless steel are different materials with some things in common and others different.) Rim Fire barrels can take an extremely long time to break in -- sometimes requiring several hundred rounds or more. But cleaning can be lengthened to every 25-50 rounds. The break-in procedure and the clearing procedure are really the same except for the frequency. Remember the goal is to get or keep the barrel clean while polishing out the throat.

    Finally, the best way to break-in the barrel is to observe when the barrel is broken in; i.e. when the fouling is reduced. This is better than some set number of cycles of "shoot and clean" as many owners report practically no fouling after the first few shots, and more break-in would be pointless. Conversely, if more is required, a set number would not address that either. Besides, cleaning is not a completely benign procedure so it should be done carefully and no more than necessary.
    I have found some factory chrome moly barrels to be so **** rough I gave up on the procedure after 3 days and close to 50 rounds fired. They still foul badly today and it takes me a couple days to get all the copper out of the barrel using sweet's 7.62

  12. #12

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    There are also some good past threads on barrel break in also. Some believe in it and some dont. I've only ever tried it once and it seemed to work. the whole idea is to work out the rough spots and "smooth" the bore so copper isn't stripped from the bullet and deposited in rough areas of the bore. Based on that, my approach is to shoot and clean until patch is white and repeat after every shot until fouling ceases. It took 13 shots in my Sako, and all of a sudden the fouling stopped. It's basically like a lapping process. There are some accomplished shooters that break their barrels in abd there are some that don't. Shawn Carlock discussed this issue in another forum. He is a very accomplished shooter and for the most part doesn't break his barrels in because he uses barrels from custom barrel makers and they are already lapped. He also does not clean his barrels until they show sings degrading accuracy and has rifles shooting sub 1/2 MOA that haven't been cleaned for over 200 rounds.

    There are a lot of opinions on this subjct (go figure ) I've re-thunk my opinion based on my experiences as well as others. I found that breaking in my "factory" Sako barrel did infact reduce copper fouling significantly. Sooo, any new rifles or barrels I may get in the future I will break in until I see no or very little fouling and then clean only when I see degredation in accuracy.

    Just my $.02

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