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Thread: Hanwaag boots

  1. #1

    Default Hanwaag boots

    Have any hard-core sheep/goat hunters ever tried the Hanwag Alaska GTX boot? I am looking to replace my Meindls and have heard that the Hanwaags are well-constructed, tough and comfortable. Any info would be appreciated.

  2. #2

    Default Hanawag boots

    They are some of the best leather German mountaineering boots made. However, Lathrop and Sons, is the sole US importer. They run more than 700 dollars for the complete Lathrop and Sons system. This is nuts. No wonder Lathrop and Sons has a world class deer hunting retreat.

    You can buy them from Great Britain over the Internet. I think you might have to pay a duty on them but it would be worth it.

    Canada also has them but you would have to do the same.

    I really like the custom construction but I don't have that like of money for boots.

    Sincerely,

    Thomas

  3. #3
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    Just looked those boots up, they are ridiculously expensive. almost as much as my alpine touring ski boots. i am a firm believer in quality gear and footwear, since you spend a whole lot of time on your feet, but with so many quality boots out there in the $250-400 price range, asking more then $500 for a pair of leather/GTX hikers seems a bit much. are these boots really that great?

  4. #4

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    I think that just buying the boots instead of all of Lathrop's ridiculous extras would cost somewhere around $300. That's still a lot of money however. I think that my Meindls were around $200? These have been good boots but lately they have been hurting the backs of my heels. I have tried thicker socks, two socks and even different insoles but to no avail. The padding behind the heel is compressed and there is no way to really fix it. A pad would never stay in place and if you would sew it in, the G-tex bootie would be compromised. Not really sure what to do. The boots have some more miles left on them, but when climbing hills, especially with a loaded pack, they are becoming almost unbearable because of the pressure on the backs of my heels. I know that Cabela's Meindls are not quite as good as the real Meindls, but I am not sure how much different the heel part of the boot would be.

  5. #5
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    i have to look at the extra's they offer, i didn't see that part, just saw a $550 price tag.

    your meindels are cabela's? if there is now an issue with their heel, seems like their customer service would take care of you? i don't have any experience with cabelas and used footwear issues, but have heard that they have taken boots back for a replacement pair.

    so far i really like the kenetrek mountain boots i got (400 thinsulate). fit really nice.

  6. #6
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    Hanwaags are available in Whitehorse, Yukon Territory......Some German folks own a medical supply store and also have some Hanwaags.....not a lot of inventory.

  7. #7

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    I also talked to lathrop & Sons about there Hanwags. I would have at least liked to try them on but if you return them for whatever reason, you will pay for shipping both ways and a 10% stocking fee. 30 dollars for shipping and at least another 30 bucks for restocking. I can see paying for shipping but the restocking fee really chilled me. 60 bucks to try on a pair of boots is ridiculous.Hanwags only come the standard width so if you need wide's your gonna have issues's. Lathrop says they can stretch them out after you try them on, but of course now you have to send them back again and here comes more shipping charges. I think there's a reason not many people are wearing these boots's.........Ken

  8. #8
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    i wouldn't do business with any store that charges a restocking fee for boots. electronic items that need repackaging, i can maybe come around to, but boots? i have bought and returned plenty of footwear, i could not imagine having paid a restocking fee just to return a clean (you wore them in your home and not outside) pair of boots. They must think these boots walk on water or something to be able to charge that. Charging shipping is a given, they shouldn't have to absorb that cost.

  9. #9

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    They might be good boots but it appears that Lathrop and Sons is sticking it to the consumer. I don't think that I want to deal with a business like that.

    Since I am fussy about my footwear I insist on trying my boots on. I have a couple of Kenetrek dealers fairly close to me so I may look into them. Do you think that the Kenetreks are as rugged and stiff as my Meindls? I don't know much about Kenetrek products.

  10. #10

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    I wonder how the Kennetreks compare to the Lowa Sheephunters made for Schnees?

  11. #11
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 6.5-284 View Post
    I wonder how the Kennetreks compare to the Lowa Sheephunters made for Schnees?
    I think the kennetrek mountain 400 boots are very well made and are an extremely comfortable boot. I have well over 100 miles on mine and have never had a blister. That includes 15+ miles with them soaking wet from wading across several channels of the knik river. That said they do not have the torsional rigidity of the Lowa hunter gtx. After doing a good bit of sidehilling this year I found that the outside of my boot would bite into the mountain and hold but the inside of my foot would not. It had a tendency to roll and sit flat on the slope. To me I prefer a mountain boot that will let me stand upright with only the edges of the boot biting into the steep slopes. I am strongly considering going to the Scarpa Liskamm boots next year but some time wearing both them and the Lowa's will be needed. The Scarpa boots are the most rigid boot I have found short of going to a plastic shell.

    I have heard that the Lowa sheephunter boot is a special boot made for Schnees and is not the same as a hunter but I have not seen the two side by side. I have no doubt they are good boots. I just don't know if it is any more rigid or what the "improvement" is.

    The good thing for me is that I already have comfortable boots in the Kennetreks so I am not putting my entire hunt in jeopardy by trying something different, just $$ and hopefully I will find something better. It is a pain to get an honest comparison between mountain hunting boots since most hunters are invested in whichever boot they buy and never get to try anything else.

  12. #12
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    This site has given me some really useful information so I thought I would see if I could contribute to.
    Hanwag boots are top notch they make one of the better high end boots out there. There are some great reviews of the Alaska GTX boot but I am not a fan primarily because of the goretex the non-GTX equivalent is the Yukon my personal preference. There was a great write up on Kifaru forum about the Yukon but I can no longer find it. Found it
    http://www.kifaruforums.net/ubbthrea...true#Post12481

    Ok the only in depth write up I culd find about construction is here http://www.militarymorons.com/equipment/footwear2.html

    As for availability Lathrop and Sons have really boosted there prices and say it is there foot bed that is the key to the boot. The boot is great and swapping out the factory foot bed with the green superfeet make these boots even more comfortable.

    There are two stores in Alberta that have what u are looking for

    Mond Sports in Banff …they have both the Alaska and Yukon on their site
    http://www.monodsports.com/main.php
    Mond has the Alaska listed as $329 the Yukon at $289

    Track and trail in Edmonton…they also list both the Alaska and Yukon
    http://www.trackntrail.ca/
    Track and trail no longer lists prices which is kind of maddening

    With the exchange rate between US Cdn dollar at 18% you should be able to get a good deal on them or at least cover the cost of taxes and/or shipping.

    Mond Sports also has a sizing chart that is useful
    http://www.monodsports.com/main.php?p=31
    Last edited by Trevor60; 01-03-2009 at 05:45. Reason: forgot some info

  13. #13
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    I like my Kenetreks so far, but haven't been able to put them through their mountain hiking paces in the summer (I got them late this fall). They are fairly stiff, but no where near as stiff as mountaineering boots. Not sure how they compare to the Lowa's. Those ran really small on me, so I passed on them. For what Lujon is talking about, I'll have to wait and see till this spring when doing more hiking and less snowshoeing. It will make a difference on how big a person you are (not calling anyone fat), but if you are 6 ft tall and a stout guy versus a 6ft tall and thin person, the weight difference will have a big effect on how much your boot has to support when side-hilling. I am 5'7" and 165 lbs, so short and stalky. I would suggest trying on the Kenetreks if you have some stores near you that carry them. They have a 400 thinsulate boot and a non-thinsulate boot. both have a waterproof membrane. only the 400 comes in wide sizes. the quality appears to be good, and they are made in Italy for Kenetrek. They were very comfortable right out of th box and still are.

    The Scarpas are good boots. My favorite boots that I use here in AK are the Scarpa SL M3s. They are all leather, but not waterproof. But they are by far the most comfortable boots I have worn. The Liskamms get some good reviews, but those boots are VERY stiff. I had a pair of Scarpa Charmoz GTX boots (lightweight mountaineering boot), and they were very comfortable on several day hikes around Anchorage. I took them on a 7 day backpacking trip in Wrangell St. Elias and they tore my feet up. I won't use such a stiff soled boot again for that many days of packing. The Liskamm falls in that group. I have had the same experience with my La Sportiva Nepal Evo boots (non-plastic mountaineering boots). A plastic shell boot is different b/c your foot is actually in a liner within the boot.

  14. #14
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    I am an avowed Meindl fan since my first pair in '88 - have always used the Canada boot. Over the years Cabela's has denigrated the quality so that they are now no longer equivalent to their original quality (in fact recently heard Cabela's now owns Meindl!!). I recently purchased a pair of Kenetreks which seem well constructed but are not as stiff as the Meindl. This past season I also purchased a pair of Lowa Sheep Hunters for my son - birthday present - which he used on a sheep hunt this past fall. He was quite satisfied and he is way hard on gear. I would say the Lowa's are a bit stiffer than the Meindl's. I know nothing about the various Scarpa boots except that some hunters use them and seem to be satisfied. I almost got a pair of Hanwag boots last year but got the Kenetrek's instead - at the time I think they were around $450, certainly less than $500 - sounds like they have undergone a sig increase in price!!!

  15. #15

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    That's interesting to know about Cabelas. Are you sure that they own the company? I looked at Meindl's website in Germany and didn't see any changes. Regardless, I agree that Cabela's has cheapened up the Meindle boot. As far as that goes, I think that the quality of ALL of Cabela's gear has gotten somewhat poorer.

    I am torn between the big three--Kenetrek, Lowa Sheephunter and Hanwag. The Hanwags are good boots but the price, plus the 20% import fee, is pretty steep. I need to find a boot that does not hurt the backs of my heels when I climb.

    It is going to be tough buying boots through the mail. My foot tends to be wide in front but a bit narrow in the heel which makes mail order a guessing game. Not sure what to do.

  16. #16
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    I would try the Kenetreks in the stores near you.

    the stiffer your sole, the easier it is going to be to rub your heel raw, as your foot flexes and the boot doesn't, your heel will naturally pull up and rub. that is why i went with the kenetreks, they are stiff, but have very minimal flex, versus my la sportiva mountaineering boots and the scarpas i used to have. i found they are much more comfortable hiking in the snow and kicking steps upwards in the snow, rather then hiking in shale, talus, etc.

    i have a decent amount of experience mountain hiking and backpacking, close to no experience in mountain hunting (except for ptarmigan, but am planning first goat and sheep hunts), and i think VERY stiff boots, for me, are overrated. unless you want them for carrying down heavy loads. i have side stepped, side hilled, gone up and down steeps in my minimally flexible all-leather scarpas and other light weight hikers, and have not had issues. hence i settled on the kenetreks.

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