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Thread: Choclate Lab Puppies

  1. #1
    Member MikeGSP's Avatar
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    Default Choclate Lab Puppies

    Does anyone have any or is expecting some choclate lab puppies? My cousin is wanting to get one for his family. Any thoughts on this would be helpful, also if no choclate lab pups he would like to get a german shepard. thanks

  2. #2
    Member Sierra Hotel's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeGSP View Post
    Does anyone have any or is expecting some choclate lab puppies? My cousin is wanting to get one for his family. Any thoughts on this would be helpful, also if no choclate lab pups he would like to get a german shepard. thanks
    I understand shepherds can be a little hard-mouthed . . .

  3. #3

    Default chocolates

    Mike,

    I am hoping to breed my female this summer with a male from Delta. The male is a yellow, but very white. So sometime during this year I am hoping to have some pups available.

  4. #4

    Default

    Does the yellow male carry chocolate? Does your female carry yellow?
    You might end up with a litter of all blacks or some yellows with pink noses (dudleys) depending on what they carry...
    Best check into it further...
    "It's the journey that's important, with experience and knowledge to be gained along the way, in the company of our faithful dogs and our good friends."
    Ralph Waldo Emerson

  5. #5
    Member akdrifter's Avatar
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    Default Brown dogs ready for homes

    PM'd you with info

    good luck

    Steve

  6. #6

    Default Last Frontier

    I guess I better check into it a bit more. What is a dudley? I honestly don't know a whole lot about it other than I know if they have the the colors in the line, they can throw them all.

  7. #7

    Default

    A dudley is a yellow lab lacking correct pigmentation (pink nose, pink lips, pink eye rims).
    If you read this page, it will tell you everything you want to know about pigmentation in yellow labs.
    http://www.woodhavenlabs.com/yellow-pigment.html
    "It's the journey that's important, with experience and knowledge to be gained along the way, in the company of our faithful dogs and our good friends."
    Ralph Waldo Emerson

  8. #8

    Default

    • I don't know how well you remember your genetics lessons from biology, but there are phenotypes which is what the lab looks like and genotypes which include all the colors a lab can carry.
      These are the phenotypes:


    • If your dog is
      black
      Possible ChromaGene™
      Types are:
      I, II, III, IV.


      If your dog is
      yellow
      with a black nose
      Possible ChromaGene™
      Types are:
      V, VI.


      If your dog is
      chocolate,
      Possible ChromaGene™
      Types are:
      VIII, IX.

    • If your dog is
      yellow
      with a liver nose
      Your dog is
      ChromaGene™
      Type VII.
    "It's the journey that's important, with experience and knowledge to be gained along the way, in the company of our faithful dogs and our good friends."
    Ralph Waldo Emerson

  9. #9

    Default

    This page describes the genotypic combinations for labradors.
    http://www.blueknightlabs.com/color/coatcolor.html
    "It's the journey that's important, with experience and knowledge to be gained along the way, in the company of our faithful dogs and our good friends."
    Ralph Waldo Emerson

  10. #10

    Default

    More important than color are health clearances.
    You should research hip and elbow dysplasia, EIC, CNM, PRA and RD.
    "It's the journey that's important, with experience and knowledge to be gained along the way, in the company of our faithful dogs and our good friends."
    Ralph Waldo Emerson

  11. #11
    Member tboehm's Avatar
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    Default more info

    Everyone could probably use a little more info, like does he want something local, how much is he looking to spend, what type of dog is he looking for, what is the purpose of the dog, etc....

  12. #12
    New member
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    Kink Alaska surrounded by sled dog kennels, a fabulous view and lots of hunting.
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    Default Does anyone have a volkswagon for sale?

    If not I'll take a astrovan.

    www.alaskadognews.com

  13. #13

    Default

    Astrovans? Puppies? Genotypes, Phenotypes.
    Where am I ?

  14. #14

    Default

    I know the majority of you could care less about genotypes and phenotypes, but if you are breeding labradors, they are important.
    Phenotypically a dog could be free of CNM (centronuclear myopathy), EIC
    (exercise induced collapse), RD (retinal dysplasia) or PRA (progressive retinal atrophy). Genotypically, a dog might carry one copy of the gene for these conditions...no big deal it doesn't affect the health of the dog.
    BUT breed two carriers of these genes and you WILL produce pups affected with these conditions.

    Pups with CNM do not have muscles that develop properly. Pups will have trouble eating and drinking because the muscles of the esophagus don't push the food down to the stomach. If they do keep enough down to sustain them the muscles of locomotion are so poorly developed they can not even walk around the block without tiring. It is the doggie form of muscualr dystrophy.

    Pups with RD will go blind around the age of 3-5 years. (average)
    Pups with PRA start going blind around 5-7 years. (average)
    Pups with EIC collapse when they get over excited. Usually this occurs when they hunt, but some are so affected they will have a collapse when you greet them coming home after work.

    Alot of people think the labs here in Alaska don't carry these conditions, but I have seen or know of pups affected with each of these conditions here.

    You wouldn't want to be sold a pup with one of these conditions. If you are breeding, do your homework and don't produce pups affected with these conditions.
    "It's the journey that's important, with experience and knowledge to be gained along the way, in the company of our faithful dogs and our good friends."
    Ralph Waldo Emerson

  15. #15

    Default

    I agree.
    A lot of people aren't aware of what they are producing when they breed their dogs. It is very important to do your homework on genetic issues as well as temperament when considering a mating pair.
    Their are genetic issues that can be hidden. Your dog may be a carrier of a gene and may never shows signs of a genetic issue. But when you breed to dogs that are both carriers, well then you produce pups that are affected. So breeding what seems to be two normal dogs together actually can create problems within the breed. A lot of the info that Last Frontier has posted is related to these issues. There are test that can be done to ensure that genetic issues are not passed along. As responsible breeders we must protect the breed we love so much.
    If you have questions on this many of us here on the forum will be glad to help direct you and educate you on genetic issues to be aware of.

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