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Thread: Ultimate ultra light gear list.

  1. #1
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Default Ultimate ultra light gear list.

    Comfort be d@&^%$!! I am trying to put together the ULTIMATE Ultra light gear list.

    Western Mountaineering Ultralite super down bag 1lbs 15oz
    Ptarmigan Bivi 6.6 oz
    Integral designs silwing tarp 12oz
    Thermarest z-lite 15oz

    Total camp weight would be 4lbs 6oz!

  2. #2
    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Don't forget to cut your toothbrush in half

    Seriously, 4 lbs 6 oz!! I cut that much weight every day just before the shower and shave.

    Man, you are on a mission. I would suggest checking out what the tree huggers do on these sites. You might find some good tips/products.

    http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-...ght/index.html

    http://www.backpacker.com/cgi-bin/forums/ikonboard.cgi

    But if you go with one of those dinky alchohol stoves, I won't be able to take you seriously anymore
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

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    Member Buck Nelson's Avatar
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    Default Light packs are good!

    But comfort is important to me, too. The advantage of a lighter pack is that it's a more comfortable pack. I'm always trying to keep an eye on the point of diminishing returns.

    This summer on the Continental Divide Trail I had the following for the first 2/3 of the trail:

    Feathered Friends Rock Wren bag: 1 lb. 13 oz.
    Silshelter: 15 oz.
    Ridgerest Deluxe (trimmed down) 16 oz.

    These aren't all the lightest, of course, but it was a very comfortable setup for me. In the interests of what I consider to be sensible trade-offs when it got buggy in Wyoming I switched from a Silshelter to a Six Moons Designs Lunar Solo. Built in floor and bug net for about 23 oz. I love that shelter.

    I used a Golite Pinnacle (replacing the Infinity) pack at 25 oz. This is another example of going slightly heavier for more comfort. On the Appalachian Trail I used a G4 pack at 11 oz. Longer stretches between resupply called for a heavier food load and thus a heavier pack.

    I'd say about 3/4 of the folks on the "long trails" use alcohol stoves, and I'm one of them. Sorry Dan!

    On my next sheep hunt I'll probably use the Rock Wren, Lunar Solo, alcohol stove and Ridgerest along with a frame pack.

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    Default Maybe no loss in comfort

    Comfort be d@&^%$!!
    I upgraded from a TNF Cat's Meow to a WM UltraLite this past summer, and I would say the WM down bag is considerably more comfortable AND weighs less. In this case, less is indeed more. The UltraLite has a narrow, "tailored" fit and won't fit everyone well, though.

    I carried a Z-rest for years, as I lashed it on the back of my internal frame pack. I loved it's easy access (I would unclip it during breaks and meals for a place to sit) and the lack of rolling required. That thing is not comfortable, though. I can even notice a increase in insulation and comfort with the RidgeRest compared to the Z-rest. If you truely don't care about comfort, you may consider the Gossamer Gear ThinLite Pads.

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    Member AKShawn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mtn Wx View Post
    I upgraded from a TNF Cat's Meow to a WM UltraLite this past summer, and I would say the WM down bag is considerably more comfortable AND weighs less. In this case, less is indeed more. The UltraLite has a narrow, "tailored" fit and won't fit everyone well, though.

    I carried a Z-rest for years, as I lashed it on the back of my internal frame pack. I loved it's easy access (I would unclip it during breaks and meals for a place to sit) and the lack of rolling required. That thing is not comfortable, though. I can even notice a increase in insulation and comfort with the RidgeRest compared to the Z-rest. If you truely don't care about comfort, you may consider the Gossamer Gear ThinLite Pads.
    At the expense of sounding like a complete moron... Who is WM?

  6. #6
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKShawn View Post
    At the expense of sounding like a complete moron... Who is WM?
    Western Mountaineering

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    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buck Nelson View Post

    I'd say about 3/4 of the folks on the "long trails" use alcohol stoves, and I'm one of them. Sorry Dan!

    .


    I found some neat stuff at the below site. Suggested from a guy on a backpacker forum.


    http://www.traildesigns.com/
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

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    Member KRS's Avatar
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    Mine Includes:

    Orikaso bowl and plate set.

    Snow Peak titanium spoon (extra long for mountain house style dinners).

    Snow Peak Solo Mini-Cookset

    Snow Peak Giga stove

    I've made a dozen pepsi-can alcohol stoves but I don't use them very often... I like my giga.

    Homemade 9v battery LED light (I don't have any pics but mine is the same as any you'll google) the two LEDs are soldered to a battery top (removed from battery) and inverted on a new 9v battery. 36 hours of light.

    KRS

  9. #9
    Member AKShawn's Avatar
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    Thanks LuJon

  10. #10

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    I've thought of picking up a Nunatak pad to replace my z-rest. They're only 12 oz... I know that's heavier than Gossamer Gear's, but I bet it's more comfortable. http://www.nunatakusa.com/site07/acc...es/lunapad.htm

    I did a calculation about a year back and found that an ultralight soda can alcohol stove + pop bottle of fuel actually weighs slightly more than a Gigapower stove + canister of fuel, assuming both systems have enough fuel for 12 meals. I've thought of picking up or making an alcohol stove anyway for the environmental green factor.

    I just picked up a Tarptent Double Rainbow and got an REI Nooksack UL as a present. Last year's pack weight for 3 days was about 27 lbs, though I was packing 2 people's worth of food and a gun. This should cut things back a couple pounds. I'm stoked.
    Last edited by Wolfeye; 01-01-2009 at 19:13. Reason: spelling error
    Tsimshian tribe, wolf clan, the house of Walsk.

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    Definitely spend some nights in the backcountry with such ultralight gear (especially alcohol stoves) before you commit yourself to a longer trip. What your alcohol or Esbit stove does in your driveway, will not help you out at 4000 ft on a windy night. I tried the ultralight route once several years ago, and it is not comfortable, especially the sleeping pad bit. I am a believer in lightweight gear, but the ultralight stuff is not for me (except the lightest down bag you can get for your desired temp rating, those work great!)

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    Member Buck Nelson's Avatar
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    You've made some very good points. The lighter the gear the more experience with that gear or similar lightweight gear a person needs in order to use it safely.

    Also, preferences vary greatly. Some people need a much warmer sleeping bag than others. Some people can sleep comfortably with a much thinner pad than others. What works perfectly well for one person will not work well for another.

    One thing I'm very careful on is bringing what I need to get a good night's sleep. A few more ounces for a comfortable pad and a warm enough bag are well worth it. Personally, I don't need a fancy shelter, and I don't need a heavy shelter. For about 2 lbs or less I can sleep dry and bug free and that's what counts. If I can sit up and stretch out I have plenty of room.

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    I second the good night's sleep part. It isn't any good to save 14 oz on sleeping pad weight if you have to carry it with a tired body. I like sleeping on my side, and thin pads provide me with no rest.

  14. #14
    Member AKShawn's Avatar
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    Default Light stove options

    I have been looking for a new ultralight stove and was wondering if anyone have any experince with the Snow Peak New Lite Max, Giga Stove, or the Optimus Crux or Flex? I have heard a lot of people like the MSR Pocket Rocket, but I have seen these others that are either newer and lighter and was wondering how well the compared to the MSR.

    Thanks!

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    Member AKShawn's Avatar
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    Bump to the top please.

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    Member shphtr's Avatar
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    Ultimate ultra lite gear......you need to explore this web site and the offered products: http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-...WfliaZXaa0T78Q

  17. #17
    Member AKShawn's Avatar
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    Great site, thanks!

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    I'm thinking this could be a great piece of gear. Bivy, rain gear and pack cover all in one for 1lb 7ozs. I could see it being pretty darn nice to have sitting on the side of wet, windy mountain glassing. Hilleberg Bivanorak

    More info and pics: moontrail.com Bivanorak


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    Member KRS's Avatar
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    Nice bivvy/poncho. But $175 for ripstop nylon with a zipper and some draw cords? I like it, but ouch!

    KRS

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    Quote Originally Posted by KRS View Post
    Nice bivvy/poncho. But $175 for ripstop nylon with a zipper and some draw cords? I like it, but ouch!

    KRS
    Yup, but, it's about the same price as bivy. And a lot less than a bivy, pack cover and rain gear.

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