View Poll Results: What is your favorite fall time dolly fly?

Voters
23. You may not vote on this poll
  • esl

    1 4.35%
  • battle creek special

    2 8.70%
  • polar shrimp

    0 0%
  • egg immitation (glo bug or beads)

    17 73.91%
  • mickey finn

    0 0%
  • fall favorite

    0 0%
  • copper and orange

    0 0%
  • dolly dynamite

    2 8.70%
  • other (pm me)

    1 4.35%
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 22

Thread: What is your favorite fall time dolly fly?

  1. #1
    Member danattherock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    5,608

    Default What is your favorite fall time dolly fly?

    I love fly fishing for trophy dollies. Always trying to learn different tactics/flies to use. Anyone else enjoy fishing for them? Anyone been to NW Alaska to fish for them? If so, share your experiences/big fish stories here. If you are shy, or don't want to post your favorite spot, shoot me a pm. I live 5,000 miles away, I won't burn your hole Not a lot of talk about these wonderful fish. Perhaps because they are smaller in some parts of the state. Or maybe it is that people are targeting other species and catch dollies, perceiving them as a nuisance. Not sure. But I am happy to chase them for a week or two each fall on our yearly float trips. Even got the wife into it. The solitude and scenery is a plus too. We have three five pounders, two eight pounders, three nine pounders, an eleven pounder, and a fourteen pounder to date. Keep hoping to break that twenty pound barrier. Not sure if it will ever happen, but it sure is fun trying.

    Below is a pic of my 14 lb dolly. Post pics of your nice dolly catches. Arctic char welcome.

    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  2. #2
    Member jakec5253's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    381

    Default tie

    I have two favorites. The battle creek special is hard to beat, but so is a dead drifted bead.

    Jake

  3. #3
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Eagle River/ Juneau
    Posts
    5,154

    Default

    nothing quite like catching dollies in the salt on floating smolt patterns
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  4. #4

    Default Fav

    the Dolly Crusher.

    Ahhh, the dreaded Boga grip raises it ugly head again.

  5. #5
    Member danattherock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    5,608

    Default

    I have never heard of a "dolly crusher". How do you tie it

    I know, I know, I know.....

    First time I had used one. My logic was good. Keeps the fish smell of me so my wife and I don't get night time visitors, keeps my hands off the fish to prevent wiping its protective slime off, and I can weigh the sucker at the same time. Got a lot of crap since showing the picture. Still not convinced you are right. At a minimum, I was about 300 miles closer to the fish than anyone here. I had a better view at the jaw. I was careful and don't feel that I injured the fish in any way. But I have been giving the Boga Grip a lot of thought.
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  6. #6

    Default boga

    I didnt say you did anything wrong. Real easy to do so with such a tool though. Good luck

  7. #7
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Eagle River/ Juneau
    Posts
    5,154

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by danattherock View Post
    First time I had used one. My logic was good. Keeps the fish smell of me so my wife and I don't get night time visitors, keeps my hands off the fish to prevent wiping its protective slime off, and I can weigh the sucker at the same time. Got a lot of crap since showing the picture. Still not convinced you are right. At a minimum, I was about 300 miles closer to the fish than anyone here. I had a better view at the jaw. I was careful and don't feel that I injured the fish in any way. But I have been giving the Boga Grip a lot of thought.
    I think its the angle of the neck that tweaks folks, that fish looks pretty dead, even if it isn't.
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  8. #8
    Member danattherock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    5,608

    Default

    AK powder monkey,

    I can see that. But she was very lively. In fact, it took several shots to get one with her not spinning around. Got her in quick as I could with a stiff 8 wt, ran over yelling at the wife to take the picture, ran her back to the water. Held her in the current for about 10 seconds, told her I would let her go if she would send her big brother back to see me. She agreed, so I let her go. She took off like a rocket. But I do see what you mean.

    Whitepalm,

    I agree with you too in that this tool has the potential to do harm if not used properly. That boga grip got lots of panties in wads. But I suspect most were twisted pretty good before they saw the picture. I think that a person with some common sense could use the boga grip very effectively. It barely holds tension on the fish where it comes together and the places where it comes together are not sharp (at all). The fish's weight is what applies force to the tips. So, the heavier the fish, the greater the holding power. Likewise, the lighter the fish, the more gentle the holding power. Logical enough. Once attached, it turns on ball bearings in every direction so if the fish is a little green, you are not putting lateral pressure on him. He spins like a fat girl on a merry go round. The real question that I could see coming up would be if people carelessly reached down to get the fish and attached the boga grip in the soft tissue of the lower jaw. Easy to imagine what would happen. But if easily letting the clamps down right at the distal portion of the bony prominence, I just don't see any damage being done. By this standard, people should not hold fish by the mouth with their hands. Like any tool, it is as good (or bad) as the hand that holds it.
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  9. #9
    Member danattherock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    5,608

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ak_powder_monkey View Post
    nothing quite like catching dollies in the salt on floating smolt patterns

    Tell me more


    I have read lots about people using top water sliders for dollies. Skating a fly is the term I have heard. Often throwing them up against large cut banks. The waller walker comes to mind. Is this a similar technique? Teach me something.
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  10. #10
    Member Scottsum's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Kenai, Ak
    Posts
    395

    Default Sorry Dan

    Hey Dan, I know you guys are off the boga grip issue but I just want to give my two cents. If you look at the pictures, it sure looks like the boga puts salmonid's heads at an extreme angle. If you look at Bass and other warm water and saltwater species, their heads seem to stay straight when the boga is used. Trout and salmon must just be built differently. I'm no biologist, but I know trout and salmon spines are fragile things. I have been a commercial fisherman my whole life and it has been drilled into me that you never pick-up a fish by its tail because it will stretch the spine causing all the blood vessels to break, bruising the meat and ruining the product before it even gets processed for consumption. I know you're not picking it up by its tail, but that angle just makes me nervous. I think the best way to handle a fish that is going to be released is as little as possible, but if you want a picture, I think it's important to support as much of the fish's weight as possible with both hands and keep their heads in line with their bodies. These fish aren't designed to feel the gravitational pull of the earth. For weighing, I've never tried one, but those nets with built in scales look interesting and rubber mesh nets are very safe on the fish's slime layer. You can also just take some measurements and calculate a close estimated weight according to the formula.

    I'm not doggin you man, that's a beautiful fish, and I know you're as concerned with proper release tactics as I am. I just want to make sure I can catch that hawg this summer if make it out there.

  11. #11
    Member danattherock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    5,608

    Default

    Your thoughts are well noted. Thanks for sharing.
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  12. #12
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Eagle River/ Juneau
    Posts
    5,154

    Default

    dollies don't release well, boga or not, I have heard that boga's are not good for trout as well, but then again dollies are very prone to losing slime and dying. When you look at that picture one little jerk of your left hand (or flop of the fish) and that spine is broken. To avoid slime lost make sure you wet your net and hands before handling the fish. Proabably better for the fish than the tailer to use the boga, the boga is designed for warmwater fish for the most part not really for trout

    Anyway enough beating a dead horse floating smolt patterns are effective just about any where fish are keyed into smolt I'm sure I've posted these before but I'll post em again (sorry G_smolt) heres a deer hair model


    and a foam version

    I think you can use porcupine quills for bodies as well gotta find one to figure that out

    I think they fished ay better than subsurface flies because you could dead drift and twitch like they were dead smolt. Plus alot of fish will chase a school of fish and hit and stun them then swing back around and pick up the stunned fish, with floating flies you can strip strip strip then when a fish hits if you miss it pause and they'll come back and bam!
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  13. #13
    Member danattherock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    5,608

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ak_powder_monkey View Post
    but then again dollies are very prone to losing slime and dying. When you look at that picture one little jerk of your left hand (or flop of the fish) and that spine is broken. !

    That was my first thought and largely why I got the boga grip. At least in the south, that is all I hear about, wiping the slime off and making the fish susceptable to disease.

    Then the second part when you mention a little jerk or the fish flopping its head, well, that is where the ball bearing come in. The tool turns to the side if the fish moves. The part that holds the fish spins on the handle that you hold.

    I think I should just start telling people about my 14 lb dolly instead of showing pictures

    Seriously, I appreciate the input. You guys got me thinking about what I am doing and that is a good thing. Last thing I would want to do is have a 14 lb dolly floating belly up because of something I did. That would be a bad day.
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  14. #14
    Member danattherock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    5,608

    Default

    AK_powder_monkey,

    Looking at the pictures again, is it night time in the bottom image? Do you catch dollies at night? For some reason, it never occurred to me to try.
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  15. #15
    Member growden1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    193

    Default

    Hey Dan,

    I remember the last time I talked about your Dolly Picture, pretty sure you gave me the "your in Fairbanks and I'm 2 feet from the fish" lecture. I won't say anything on this post except.....****.....nice fish man!!!

    Fish On!
    http://www.youtube.com/growden1

    Nothing makes a fish bigger than almost being caught.

  16. #16
    Member danattherock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    5,608

    Smile

    Yeah, of course I remember. You #($#*$&@*@&#(@.

    Nobody likes to feel like they are doing something wrong. Especially when they are trying so hard to do it right in the first place. I am no exception. Just tonight had a few thoughts about a bloated 14 lb dolly decaying away on the bottom of one of the deeper pools on the Wulik, little sculpins zipping in and out snatching a morsel of flesh here and there. But I still don't think I tortured the fish in question. That is what I am telling myself at any rate. But I am trying to be open minded. Especially since so many *@#$&#$_&&)$#(*&()$)%($#*_)+$*)($*)@#(&)$@&*($@)$& *@)(&$)@$&*(_)@(&*)@$(&*$@_+)$(&*@)+&*@)+($&)@($&* )+@$(@$&*)+@$&$)($)(*%&#*)(#&)($&*#&#%_+(&)+#*(%(# +)(%+%#)(&*%#+)(*)%#(&_)+%%&* keep telling me that the boga grip is not good for the fish. I could be right and all of you could be wrong, but I kind of doubt it. Nor could I prove it.


    And did you vote in the poll up top??

    If I am going to let you guys give me a prison bathroom orientation into proper catch and release techniques, I want some info out of the deal




    .
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  17. #17
    Premium Member Wyo2AK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Spenard
    Posts
    1,232

    Default

    Dan... that is a pig of dolly! Holy cow!

    I tie a lot of flies and am always trying to come up with something more effective - so it's hard to really pick a favorite. I'd say my favorite fall dolly patterns usually involves rabbit fur in some way or another.

    That said, I don't know if anything is consistently more effective than beads/egg patterns.

    I think everyone on this forum generally cares greatly for the well-being of the fish we pursue, and no one wants to see a released fish swim off worse for wear. I applaud everyone for taking an avid interest in appropriate fish handling. Of course... if we really cared about the health of these fish, we should probably all stop fishing for them altogether.
    Pursue happiness with diligence.

  18. #18
    Member Scottsum's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Kenai, Ak
    Posts
    395

    Default They like the challenge.

    I still say they like the challenge somewhere in their pea-sized brains. Few of us (in reasonably good shape) would argue how good it feels to get out and stretch our muscles in some kind of vigorous exercise. I think these fish must enjoy the work to a certain extent, even if they're not conscious of it. At least that's my story and I'm sticking to it.

    I suppose we could switch to TAG (touch-and-go) hooks. There are those who think the strike is everything. I like the fight an awful lot too, though

  19. #19
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Eagle River/ Juneau
    Posts
    5,154

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by danattherock View Post
    AK_powder_monkey,

    Looking at the pictures again, is it night time in the bottom image? Do you catch dollies at night? For some reason, it never occurred to me to try.
    Just as the sun leave the water and the smolt start really moving... The dolly was bycatch I was really fishing for cutts, we caught a ton of 8-15 inch cutties and got off the water after dark. SEAK in may is something special

    I just realized that this poll was about fall time dollies... And I'll stick with smolt for fresh sea runs, I've caught a lot while silver fishing with clousers and I found some dollies in kodiak don't hit typical fall flies but go nuts for smolt, but for spawners its pretty hard to beat bead/globug fishing but I prefer to swing little teeny steelhead flies like a polar shrimp, little franks flies or something simular and pink. It also seems to be a better method for cutts than beading. Often I don't catch very large dollies, typically a big one is 12 inches or so but on a 3 wt fiberglass on a teeny stream it makes me wish more brook trout held on in this state.
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  20. #20
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Eagle River/ Juneau
    Posts
    5,154

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by danattherock View Post
    That was my first thought and largely why I got the boga grip. At least in the south, that is all I hear about, wiping the slime off and making the fish susceptable to disease.

    Then the second part when you mention a little jerk or the fish flopping its head, well, that is where the ball bearing come in. The tool turns to the side if the fish moves. The part that holds the fish spins on the handle that you hold.

    I think I should just start telling people about my 14 lb dolly instead of showing pictures

    Seriously, I appreciate the input. You guys got me thinking about what I am doing and that is a good thing. Last thing I would want to do is have a 14 lb dolly floating belly up because of something I did. That would be a bad day.
    Yea man, I'm sure I hurt a heck of a lot of dollies in my day, I bet that fish did fine... You could just say you ate the thing when you are in the middle of nowhere theres not that much harm in keeping a sea run or too as long as you eat em right away.

    As far as I know getting your hands wet before you touch dollies will do little damage, but dry hands (or nets) will probably kill them.

    Bogas are great, just don't hang trout from em, but you could use them to control the fish while the water supports it, also they are super useful for pike, bass, rockfish, lingcod, double uglies, muskies, carp, food fish (dead salmon etc), tarpon and a vast number of other fish. They are a great tool, I wish I could afford one.

    For weighing trout the preferred way is to put them in a wet mesh bag and hang them in that, you could also teir a net if its got a deep enough bag and weight it with your fish in it, that is super fast.
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •