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Thread: what snow shoes?

  1. #1
    Member Magnum Man's Avatar
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    Default what snow shoes?

    The only ones ive tried are ther huge wooden canadian ones. Im looking at the cabellas alaskan giude the cabellas outfitter pro or the msr denali with the detachable tails. I would mostly be hiking traills or possibly used for hunting. Usually will have a pack on. Any suggestions? Thanks

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    Member icb12's Avatar
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    If I remember right the Cabelas models are rebadged Atlas shoes. Atlas makes good stuff.

    Atlas 1035s or 1235s get my vote. I would Def. get the 35" though, especially if you plan on having a pack on most of the time.

    I have a friend who loves his MSR shoes with the detachable tails though, seem to float well, but I haven't tried them.

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    Member Magnum Man's Avatar
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    Default too late

    I just got the msr Denali locally with the 8'' tails. Tried them out in the yard seemed to do what they sposed to do. Ill give them the what for this weekend. It was 175 bucks for the shoes plus the tails. I still gotta get some poles i think though.

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    Quote Originally Posted by icb12 View Post
    If I remember right the Cabelas models are rebadged Atlas shoes. Atlas makes good stuff.
    The Cabela's Alaskan Guide Snowshoe is made by GV snowshoes in Canada.
    Just got an e-mail back from GV. I asked for a dealer for there snowshoe model "Snow Trail".
    They said Cabela's.
    The other models may very well be Atlas.
    I tried a friends Cabela's Alaskan Guide Snowshoe. Liked them and ordered a pair.

    Doug

    http://www.gvsnowshoes.com/eng/index.html

  5. #5
    Member Magnum Man's Avatar
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    Thumbs up good but...

    Ill definitley be getting a real pair of snowshoes next year. These are a little skinny the deep stuff. 8 wide by 22 long or 30 long. not wide enuff for the powder. So far I tried them in 3 feet of powder and was sinking about knee deep. Im 210lbs. I want to be able to use a pack.

  6. #6

    Default trade off

    You will need a big pair of snowshoes in order to get real float, I think the snowshoes built today give you more or less a solid platform to walk on other than big floatation. I like the MSRs because they are light and easy to repair if something were to fail. I dont mind getting knee deep. If you want big float I would go past 10 or 12 by 36 to something bigger. Since Oct 2 I have been out 80 days, sometimes 3miles sometimes 8miles. On some days my pack weighs 7lbs and sometimes 50lbs, one thing is for sure, snowshoeing will get you in shape. Good luck in your quest for float.

  7. #7
    Member COtoAK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Magnum Man View Post
    I just got the msr Denali locally with the 8'' tails. Tried them out in the yard seemed to do what they sposed to do. Ill give them the what for this weekend. It was 175 bucks for the shoes plus the tails. I still gotta get some poles i think though.
    My snowshoes came with pole, but I still prefer my husband's poles over my own. I have RedFeather snowshoes.

    I would have suggested Atlas as well. They have a nice snowshoe that pivots with your foot.
    http://www.sortprice.com/search-OFTC...10-Snowshoeing
    I guess it's called SLS (Spring Loaded Suspension)
    I have soon become a fan of Atlas Snowshoes from everything that I hear about them. Even this impresses me:
    http://www.atlassnowshoe.com/product/e12

    Here is a quote about your snowshoe:
    I have MSR Denali Ascents, which I am very happy with. One thing I would note with them is that they don't float as well as other [COLOR=blue! important][COLOR=blue! important]shoes[/COLOR][/COLOR] due to there narrow profile, but that narrow profile and the excellent traction that these shoes offer make them great for hiking up mountains. On flatter terrain I would go with something else.
    http://www.thebackpacker.com/trailta...d/40409,,1.php



    Let us know how your snowshoe pans out.
    Lurker.

  8. #8
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Atlas!

    I've had a pair for 12 years, and there latest ones have even better bindings.

    I've used my wifes smaller snowshoes on trails, and use my longer shoes off trail. In very fine deep snow you'll still sink quite a bit, but in "average" snow conditions travel will be much easier and more stable than post holing sans snoe shoes.

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    Default bunny boots and snowshoes

    Does anyone where bunny boots when snowshoeing? If so what type of snowshoes do you have and do you have any problems with the boots coming out of the bindings at the heel of the boot?

    Thanks

  10. #10
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    That was one thing I was going to add, you might find that larger boots don't fit in the "modern" snowshoes. There is no way I can put pack buts in my Atlas shoes, and I'd imagine the same goes for bunny boots. I use mountaineering boots, they work great and keep my feet warm.

  11. #11
    Member Magnum Man's Avatar
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    Exclamation msr

    Ive been out 3 or 4 times for a mile or two and it is hard work. Here in juneau weve been getting real light snow about 4 feet of it last week. 4 feet of pow is togh going probly for any snowshoe. It was 10 below at the mendenhall glacier and I went on on trek on the lake at nite and was going for a workout but overdid it and I think i scorched my lungs a little. Im just saying be carefull of conditions. This caught me by surprize because normally it doesnt get below 5 deg or so.

  12. #12

    Default MSR

    I have rhe MSR's with tails and they are great for trails, hills ect, great tracktion. As far as breaking trail they get a little deeper than I expected - I have been eyeing the big cabelas snowshoes lately.

    deepends on what conditions you will be in

  13. #13
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    jws,
    I always wear bunnies when I'm out snowshoeing(both black and white). I have 10X56 wood/rawhide shoes and I'm real happy with them. I like them because they are the best in deep snow and tolerable in other snow conditions. Deep snow/soft snow is the most backbreaking condition,IMO and I seem to find some of this everytime out. I snowshoe hunt for ptarmigan and around the brush the soft
    snow seems to be found frequently. My bindings are made from an innertube. I have seen this type of binding in cabela's catalogs.

  14. #14

    Default Bunnies

    I have Tubbs snowshoes and use exclusively Bunny boots. I took the slide on pad aparatus off the heel strap. The bare strap then stays snug above the retainer that is moded into the bunnies.
    I would recommend the Tubbs 36 inch.

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