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Thread: ???Rods/Reels & Baits/Lures???

  1. #1

    Question ???Rods/Reels & Baits/Lures???

    I am in the military and moving to Anchorage in July for 4 years. I am an avid fisherman in North Carolina but I am well aware of the fact my equipment may be useless in Alaska. I was hoping you guys could list your top 5 Rods/Reels and top 5 baits/lures and anything else you guys need when tearin it up in Alaska. I am likely going to have to start over with most of my fishing equipment so any help you can give me would be excellent. Thanks in advance for the assistance.

    Dave

  2. #2

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    Are we talking salt or river fishing?

  3. #3

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    I do both here in North Carolina and I plan on trying both when I get to Alaska. I do not discrimminate, I like to catch ALL fish.

  4. #4
    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Welcome to the forum man

    From NC myself.


    Lamiglass rods are a solid choice. Most of my fishing in Alaska is on our yearly float trips, so I have got the Cabelas XML travel spinning rods. They are awesome. Breakdown small and come in a hard carry case. Good protection from the TSA gorillas. I put Daiwa SS reels on them and 14 lb line. Great for everything but kings. Perfect for my wife's usage on our float trips. I fly fish myself. Any interest in that, be sure to let me know. I can bore you on the subject. The breakdown travel rods work good for us. But you will be driving to you fishing hole, so you have many more options. Read over some old post on the forum. Lots of insights to be found. Use the "search" box up top and choose the fishing section. Then type in "rod" "reel" etc... Also, a great book is "Alaska Fishing" by Gunnar Pederson and Rene Liemerres. You can buy it on the forum store and Amazon of course. It is a great book that covers all the species you would fish for in Alaska.

    Feel free to shoot me a pm with any other questions. Happy to help if I can. Not much info on gear fishing since I fly fish. The XML/Daiwa is for the wife. But happy to help in any other ways I can.

    Below is a link to the book...

    http://www.outdoorsdirectory.com/sto...products_id=57

    Below is a link to some pictures from our float trips. A change of scenery for you. You are in for a treat man! Most of our trips are in arctic NW Alaska, but one was in SW. When you click on the link below, select "slideshow" in the upper right.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/2114408...7603727567944/
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  5. #5

    Default Two words

    "Trustworthy Hardware". You will find everything you need and a great price at Trusty's in Soldonta.

    While I don't necessarily disagree with Dan, I busted 4 Lami's in one season (one wouldn't have mattered if it were a steel rod, it would have broke, so no blame on Lami). I have switched to G Loomis rods (with a few Lami hold outs). Nevertheless, I would venture a guess that more kings have been caught on Lami's on the Kenai than anything else, with Loomis a close second.

    For freshwater and light saltwater, look at the Lamiglas Kenai Special 8.5' (12-20#) rod and the Ambassadeur 6500C reel with at least 20# Big Game line (or Power Pro braid). This setup will be sufficient for 90% of the salmon fishing you will enjoy in Alaska. May be a bit light for a Kenai Hawg, but I have landed plenty of 50#+ on this rig with 15# test fishing silvers on the Kenai. If you will be mostly bank fishing, go on the heavier side of line.

    Since switching to G-Loomis I am using the HCR-1084 rod. This is a 18-30# rod. While it is a bit beefier, the tip is soft so that it doesn't feel like a stick.

    For tackle, look at K-15 or K-16 Kwikfish or T-50 or T-55 Flatfish. Both of these on about a 6' leader and either flatlined (no diver in shallow water) or behind a diver. Also, if you choose to use salmon roe, most will tie up some 5/0 - 7/0 hooks on a snell with bait loop on about a 3'-5' leader with a few beads and either a spin n glow or cheater or other attractor (freshwater). In the salt, use a florocarbon leader and a plug cut herring on a long leader behind a flasher and a down rigger or simply a banana weight.

    For silvers and pinks, anything that you cast that flashes or smells good will work (for the most part).

    Best bet, when you get here, visit a good tackle shop, like Trustworthy, and tell them that you are new to the area and need help setting up. These guys are on top of the game and know what is working and what is not. If you visit a shop in Anchorage, go to Mountain View Sports or Sportsman's Warehouse.

    Now, if you are fly fishing, that is another ball game altogether.

    Your lightweight gear may have value in Alaska fishing lakes and small streams for grayling, rainbows or dollies. I am betting your saltwater gear will work just fine. In general for halibut, most are using a 5'-6' standup rod and a good reel with at least 80# power pro line.

    Hope that helps get you going in the right direction anyhow. Good luck and keep reading as much as you can on this forum and check out some of the books that were recommended and you will find great success in your fishing endeavors.

    Cheers

  6. #6
    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Grizz,

    The hardware store he speaks of is not what you are thinking. I know what that must sound like to a guy from NC (like me), but they do have everything you would need. Been there myself a few times and looked around. A good little drive from Anchorage and you will likely want to get rigged up before then. If so, do some research and buy online of course. Cabelas is my choice. Also, in Anchorage is Sportsmans Warehouse. Big store with tons of stuff. Think of a less fancy Bass Pro Shops back home. Very well stocked outdoor store.
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

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    I just visit alaska from time to time, however I have two G. loomis travel rods. Both for fresh water. I use a 12# line and a 8# line. Not for kings, mostly silvers.

  8. #8
    Premium Member Wyo2AK's Avatar
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    Welcome!

    I'll cast another vote for "Alaska Fishing" by Gunnar Pederson. Buy it - you'll be glad you did. It's a great primer but still has ample detail for just about any kind of fishing you may want to do in Alaska.

    While you're waiting for that book in the mail, go here
    http://www.sf.adfg.state.ak.us/region2/pubs.cfm
    and read all of it.

    I won't get into brands and specific models too much. Everyone has a favorite and a preference. G Loomis, Lamiglas, Ugly Stik, are all popular rods. Abu Garcia Ambassadeur is a staple.

    Think about what you're going to be fishing for. If "everything" springs to mind, as it did for me when I moved to AK, then odds are you'll get to put a lot of your current tackle to good use.

    Consider what you have to fish for... grayling, Dolly Varden/Arctic Char, rainbows, salmon (king, silver, red, chum, pink), steelhead, northern pike, burbot, halibut, lingcod, rockfish, salmon sharks. If you get out farther from Anchorage add whitefish, sheefish, cutthroat, and more steelhead and samlon to the list. Just use your fishing sense and match rods/reels/line to the fish of choice.

    A few "standards" -

    Trolling big Kwikfish/flatfish and bouncing eggs/roe for kings on the Kenai. You'll need a boat (or a friend with a boat )

    Pixie spoons and vibrax spinners are the most popular choice of lures for casting to silvers and kings. Kings are bigger - throw the biggest they make at them.

    Eggs/roe catch salmon.

    Flies for red salmon. Some people say reds never bite, some say they do, decide for yourself. But you won't catch a lot on a pixie. Technique will account for more fish than fly selection when you want fish in the cooler.

    Pinks like pink stuff. And other stuff. Chums like whatever you're hoping a silver will bite.

    Trout/dollies/char/grayling eat salmon (and salmon by-products)... eggs, alevin, smolt, flesh from dead salmon - use lures or flies to match, depending on the time of year (and where the salmon are in the river). When they can't have salmon, they eat whatever else they can find - sculpin, leeches, bugs, etc. Fish accordingly.

    Pike eat everything.

    Jig a big jig for halibut and lingcod. Herring works too.
    Pursue happiness with diligence.

  9. #9

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    Thanks guys I will definitely check out that book. I am looking forward to the great outdoors in Alaska and I am eager to check out more forums to try and pick up some tips in the next couple months before heading out there. Thanks again and I look forward to reading more suggestions.

    Dave

  10. #10

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    I have 2 Shimano Sahara 4000 series reels that I think will be able to use. I also was wondering if you guys use any baitcasters out there? I have several baitcasters that I think I may need to get rid of.

    Dave

  11. #11
    Premium Member Wyo2AK's Avatar
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    Default Keep 'em

    Lots of people use baitcasters.

    Flipping for reds.
    Casting for silvers and kings.
    Trolling for kings (all you see is baitcasters).
    Fishing salmon in the salt.
    Bottom fishing for rockfishing/lings/halibut.

    Depending on the size of your reels, you'll put them to good use for something.

    Good luck in your re-education.
    Pursue happiness with diligence.

  12. #12

    Default almost exclusively

    Quote Originally Posted by Grizz1754 View Post
    I have 2 Shimano Sahara 4000 series reels that I think will be able to use. I also was wondering if you guys use any baitcasters out there? I have several baitcasters that I think I may need to get rid of.

    Dave
    I use spinners for casting hardware for silvers and pinks, and I have some ultralight spinners for trout, but otherwise all baitcasters (or fly casters...).

    There are many threads related to spin vs. casting, but the short version:

    Spinning reels have weaker drag, lower line capacity, tend to twist your line, but are easier to learn to cast. No doubt that spinning gear is preferred for throwing hardward, ie. spinners/spoons.

    Fishing sockeye, the reel is simply a line holder. The sockeye run the shoreline, so the preferred method is flipping the line out (fly rods are preferred by many because of the sensitivity). If you are plunking, casting is preferred, as in most boat fishing venues. For king salmon fishing, many have been caught on a spinning reel, but your will have way more control and confidence with a casting.

    Happy New Year

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    Member ken210's Avatar
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    Take this for what it's worth because I'm a salt water guy, I have nothing but bait casters on the boat. Anything from penn to abu. I just prefer bait casters to spinners.

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    Your stuff is not totally worthless so don't part with it just yet. I was in your boat some years ago, (now retired) and I'm glad I didn't sell all my lower 48 stuff. Kings require a little heavier gear and unless you buy your own boat, halibut charters provide gear. I got most of my "Alaska" fishing gear at garage sales on base. Air Force?

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    Lots of opinions, you should probably fish up there before you buy. I have a bunch of stuff, but I met this old guy and he liked his fishing rod he snapped in half with a $5 reel.

  16. #16
    Member Xanfly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grizz1754 View Post
    I have several baitcasters that I think I may need to get rid of.

    Dave
    Sacrilege!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    Only good reason to get rid of a fishing rod is to give it to someone who doesn't have one.

    When I first came to AK I had 2 light spinning reels. The only thing I bought at first was tackle and $25 King combo at Carrs. Bring what you have, you might be surprised how well it might work. If not you will at least get an idea of what you really need before buying anything new. And don't worry, you will have plenty of reasons to buy new gear. I think I am up to at least 25 rods now.

  17. #17
    Member AK A's Fan's Avatar
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    Default Personal Favorites

    My favorite:

    Rods:
    7' Ugly Stik Lite (silvers)
    7' Ugly Stick Original (mostly kings)
    8'6" Lamiglass (all)
    8'6" G Loomis (all)
    8'6" Griggs (all)

    Reels:
    Shimano Corvalus (baitcast)
    Shimano Corsair (baitcast)
    Shimano Calcutta (baitcast)
    Penn International 965 (baitcast)
    Phlueger Supreme (spinning)
    Abu Garcia Cardinal (spinning)

    Lures:
    Wiggle Wart (kings)
    Vibrax (silvers/kings)
    Spin & Glow w/ beads (silvers/kings)
    QwikFish (kings)
    Red/Coho flies or Russian River flies (reds at the russian river)

    Bait:
    Salmon Roe


    I hope this helps. What i've posted is mostly for salmon, due to the fact that I don't target trout much.
    Last edited by AK A's Fan; 12-31-2008 at 21:33. Reason: forgot something

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