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Thread: Hi from Australia

  1. #1
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    Miriam Vale, Queensland Australia
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    Default Hi from Australia

    Hi guys, Watto here from Qld Australia, I am a new pilot here and fly a Jabiru J230 which is made not far from where I live.

    Happy new year

  2. #2
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    Semi-retired in Florida
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    Default Grizzly 1

    Quote Originally Posted by Watto View Post
    Hi guys, Watto here from Qld Australia, I am a new pilot here and fly a Jabiru J230 which is made not far from where I live.

    Happy new year
    WELCOME ABOARD and HAPPY NEW YEAR, Watto. Hey . . . . . what does a Jabiru J230 compare to? Don't think I'm familiar with that machine. Is it considered a STOL airplane?

    Stick with these Alaska Bush Flying guys. They're both amusing and enlightening.

    Grizzly 1

  3. #3

    Default

    G'day Watto,
    Welcome to the forum. I had an opportunity to ride the motorcycle around your country over a couple of our Winters. Great place with friendly people. I'm currently flying a Cub powered by a Jabiru. Tell the boys there at Jabiru to keep up the good work. Look forward to your input here at the forum.

  4. #4
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    Miriam Vale, Queensland Australia
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    Default Hi Grizlly

    The J230 would be considered a light sports aircraft, it is pretty slippery and has an easy 120kn cruise and have had mine out to the vne 140kn with a tail wind without even trying.

    You can have a look at www.jabiru.net.au and see the company web site.

  5. #5
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    Default hi windy point

    I will say hello to the boys at Jabiru when I am down there next week, its good to hear about our aussie engines in other parts of the world.

    What is the cub made of ? is she cloth, I am told there are a lot of rag planes in Alaska and Canada I guess they are easy to repair and nice and light.

    regards
    Watto

  6. #6
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    Default Grizzly 1

    Quote Originally Posted by Watto View Post
    I will say hello to the boys at Jabiru when I am down there next week, its good to hear about our aussie engines in other parts of the world.

    What is the cub made of ? is she cloth, I am told there are a lot of rag planes in Alaska and Canada I guess they are easy to repair and nice and light.

    regards
    Watto
    Hey, Watto - - - - - that J230 looks like quite an airplane! I'll be reading about the flight fron Bankstown to Aukland in the next few minutes.

    Meantime, yep, the Super Cub is a favorite in Alaska, I can attest to that. Excellent for REALLY short field/short water work. They're metal tubing covered with linen (originally), though there are more favored fabric coverings on the market these days (and have been, in fact, for decades!). Until you've flown a Super Cub, you simply can't imagine what a grasshopper they really are. My last one (N1858A) was a 1952 agricultural model. I converted it from 125-hp to 150-hp, and added enough instruments and radio gear to make it fully IFR. A little heavy, compared to other "bush" Cubs, but still got off the ground (empty but with full fuel) in 92-feet.

    If you get a chance, mmasoncsi@aol.com will reach me any day.

    Low and Slow,

    Mort Mason

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