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Thread: Range Finder

  1. #1
    Member BearSlayer's Avatar
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    Default Range Finder

    Does anyone have any recommendations on a range finder? I am looking at under 300 dollars. Or do you even recommend one. I do not use one normally; but I thought for some of the longer distance shots that Caribou and Moose can provide it may be helpful. Thanks

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    Default

    I've got an older Bushnell that works fine, you can go to E-Bay and pick them up pretty cheap. I've used it on an archery haul rd caribou hunt by picking out surface features that I ranged and then I knew if the caribou crossed in front of behind the feature, what the range was. It worked for me.

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    Default Range Finder

    I use a Bushnell " Yardage Pro Scout" it works very well. Go to there web site and look at the spec's.

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    Member AK145's Avatar
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    Default In that price range....

    your looking at Bushnell and Nikon for quality products. I get a little leary of Ebay just because you never know what has happened to an item before you bought it. I used to use a Bushnell, one of the older models before they scaled down to the smaller version. Now I use a Nikon Monarch that works great. I definately reccomend picking one up as they give you a big advantage bow or rifle hunting. Usually they get cheaper depending on what yardage you want. If you want one that goes out to a 1000 yards you may pay more....but what's the point of that!!! The ones that go out to about 500 are reseasonable.

    Good Luck!

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    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default Bushnell Yardage Pro

    My Bushnell Yardage Pro has been excellent.

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    New member Frenchy in AK's Avatar
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    Default

    I too use the Nikon Monarch and have been very happy with it. I think its max range is 440 yards though. This really isn't much of a problem as I typically won't shoot at that distance, but when sneaking up on or waiting on something to move in a little closer, its nice to know what the distance is. Just so you know how much distance you actually need becfore he's within range.

    On a seperate note, has anyone had a chance to play with the new Leupold Rangefinders with their True Ballistic Range Feature. I'd be curious to see what people think of them. I've had a little experience with them, but not alot. My brother is using one this year on all his hunts and so far is pretty satisfed.

    I also offered to sell one to Bearslayer (full disclosure).

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    Member Wombat's Avatar
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    Default

    [quote=Frenchy in AK;28616]On a seperate note, has anyone had a chance to play with the new Leupold Rangefinders with their True Ballistic Range Feature. I'd be curious to see what people think of them. I've had a little experience with them, but not alot. My brother is using one this year on all his hunts and so far is pretty satisfed.quote]

    I used one of my buddies. I liked it but for the price I think I'll just stick my old trusty Bush.

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    Member BucknRut's Avatar
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    Default Let's set money aside...

    What's the best rangefinder out there? Okay, so I like to dream big!

    Take it further and tell me what the best value for my money?

    bnr

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    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Default Used a Leupold RDXII on these two

    Fits your hand good the incline meter and true balistic range worked great for me on several hunts this year.
    Attached Images Attached Images

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    Member AK145's Avatar
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    Default The best....

    I would have to say with money aside that a Swarovski would probably be the best....but how much better would it actually be than a Nikon? It's a range finder...not a spotting scope..know what I mean?

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    Member BucknRut's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Ok, Swaro not necessary...let's talk value

    Quote Originally Posted by AK145 View Post
    I would have to say with money aside that a Swarovski would probably be the best....but how much better would it actually be than a Nikon? It's a range finder...not a spotting scope..know what I mean?
    I totally agree and I would not spend the $890 on one.

    Now, what's the best VALUE?

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    Default

    Bushnell Yardage Pro Scout has worked great for me and its compact and easy to use and fairly waterproof as well.

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    Member Alaska Gray's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaskan100 View Post
    I use a Bushnell " Yardage Pro Scout" it works very well. Go to there web site and look at the spec's.

    I second that!!!!!!!! I have the 400.
    Living the Alaskan Dream
    Gary Keller
    Anchorage, AK

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    Default Leica

    I just spent quite some time looking over all of them, and decided on the new Leica. I thought it was the best price for the quality of glass. I bought mine from Cabela's. They had $150.00 gift card if you spent $500.00 and Leica had $100.00 rebate, so I felt like it was quite a value. The quality of glass was great and it will work for bino's as it has 7x magnification.

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    Just thought I would throw in another note on selecting a range finder, one with the scan feature is very important. Sometimes you cant get the animal directly in the crosshairs for one reason or another but you can scan the surroundings to give you a good measurement on distance.Food for thought.

  16. #16
    Member Adventures's Avatar
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    Default rangefinders

    While this is a bow forum and i would guess nearly any rangefinder would do i will give my opinon on the ones i've used.
    My buddy bought a new leupold this year. I'm a huge leupold fan and have thier scopes on every gun I own. however, the button is hard to press (especially with any type of hand wear) The glass is amazingly not very clear, and the readings are hard to see as they are quite small because of all of the other features that this finder has that are spread all over the place on the screen. The final straw was when i went to sportsmans to take a peak at the prices i found a very very interesting statistic that made me by a differnt model. The yardages vari depending on weather the surface you are ranging is reflective or non reflective. well, the leupold is only good to about 275 non reflective. Which in most hunting instances is good enough, however, when i'm on a stalk like i was for my caribou this year i was spotted at a little under 500 yards and had to know how close i could get to make a decent shot. Turned out to be 350 by the time i pulled the trigger. Very flat land where I was.
    So my brother ended up buying the Nikin monarch 800 wich has a range of 800 reflective and nonreflective and let me tell you the optics are great, the viewfinder is easy to read, the scan feature works very well (a must in my opinion) and we shot our tent at 803 yards from a mountains side twice with the same measurement.
    another factor is the waterproof models, alot of the cheaper models are not waterproof and therefore may not be worth the money.
    the nikon was right around 300 if i remember right and is what i believe to be the best bang for your buck in rangefinders right now.
    i know this is getting long, but i will add one more thing.
    I've hunted my entire life nad never thought i needed one of these things, because i thought the one i had built in my head was good enough. let me tell you after you get out on the wide open tundra, with no land contours and trees or anything, the one in your head is about useless. While we were toying with the new finder i found that i was at least 50 yards off if not alot more on almost everrything we looked at. it has to be the openness of the country makes everything appear closer or something.
    If i would have guessed at the distance of my caribou shot i would have said it was jsut under 250 and it was actualy 350. That's huge!!!!
    just my .02
    Sorry so long.
    Justin
    Justin

  17. #17
    Member PatrickH's Avatar
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    Default Nikon

    I like my Nikon Monarch 800. Very clear and easy to use. It is also small enough to slip in a pocket. My friend has a Leica. It is nice, but way too big to be handy for bow hunting.

  18. #18
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default Adventures

    Adventures: While some of the units you mentioned are good, an archer really only needs a range finder that will read 300 yards or less. Most shots on game are less than 20 yards on deer. Yes, caribou are shot a lot farther away but still 50 yards is still a far shot for an archer.

    So why 300? Well when stalking game you can scan the animal and available cover. If the animal is 250 yards away and you scan a ravine at 220, you know that you will be 30 yards away when you get to that ravine. If animal is hidden over a ridge and you scan a rock near the animal, you can scan back to your pack or other reference point to let you know when to stand up and look for the animal. Lots of tricks if you think about how you can use it.

  19. #19
    Member Adventures's Avatar
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    Default Dave

    Dave,
    I agree, that's why I started my statement with "for bowhunting an rangefinder will likley do"
    Justin

  20. #20
    Member Adventures's Avatar
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    Default Stid

    I forgot to mention I really do like the Incline ballistics meter on the leupold, but not enough (for my use) to justify the shortcomming of the rest of the finder.
    Justin

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