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Thread: Ever Field Strip a Ruger DA Revolver?

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    Member WinMag_300's Avatar
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    Default Ever Field Strip a Ruger DA Revolver?

    I recall reading in the older Ruger catalogs how you could easily field strip a Ruger revolver into (I think) six major sub-assemblies using only a screw driver. Ruger no longer prints this material in their catalogs. Does anyone know why? I'm thinking of buying a Ruger revolver as an outdoor sidearm and it would be nice to be able to field strip it for thorough cleaning. I once took the side plate off a S&W 66 and caught hell putting it back together after springs and small parts jumped out. I think I'm ready to try Ruger. Thanks for input on this.
    A man is rich in proportion to the number of things he can afford to let alone. - Henry David Thoreau

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    It is very easy and you get instructions with the gun.
    But it rarely needs to be done. As long as the internal workings are lightly lubed you can go for years without taking it apart.

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    Just be carefull. I only field stripped my SP101 once, and when I did, there was a little pin in the trigger assembly that popped out. I got it back in, but it was kind of a pain. That's why I've only field stripped it once. But hey, it may have been due to the fact that it was my first time, and I didn;t know what I was doing.

    This option to field strip the Ruger is why I like them so much over Smith--just in case I'm in the woods and ever need to field strip it, I can.

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    Default Why I prefer Rugers to Smiths

    I disassemble every gun I have ever owned I try to live by the rule "If you can't take it apart and put it back together, don't own it." I don't always live up to it, but I do what I can.

    Here's why I prefer Rugers to S&W:

    My first S&W was a K-22 Masterpiece 6" 22 rimfire. When I took the sideplate off the .22, I saw all those small parts inside (comparing it to my Dan Wesson, which had about half the number parts as the Smith.) I lubed the inside lightly, put the parts that sprang out back in and never opened it up again. I traded it off shortly thereafter. The Dan Wesson, in addition to having fewer parts, seemed to have more robust parts as well. Ruger parts are even more robust than the Smith or the DW. I like that.

    Undeniably, the Smiths are beautiful guns, but Rugers have their own style of beauty. And, "Beauty is as beauty does." However, My Dan Wessons have lock times that other guns can only dream of and Rugers' strength is legendary.

    My first Ruger was a Security Six. To take that apart, you didn't even need a screwdriver. Remove the grips by unscrewing the grip screw with the rim of a cartridge case (the screw is dimensioned just for that purpose).

    The pin mentioned by Ruger01 is probably the pin Ruger puts inside their guns to retain the mainspring for disassembly (though, if it came out of the trigger assembly, it is not the one I am thinking of). The mainspring guide then can be used to depress the disassembly plunger to remove the trigger group.

    Technically, I suppose, the pin and the trigger are disassembly tools, but everything you need comes inside the gun (plus the cartridge case). If you lost the pin, you can use a very small finishing nail or a medium large paper clip

    Happy shooting.

    Lost Sheep

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    Member WinMag_300's Avatar
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    Thanks for all of the insightful replies. Generally, I also like to be able to take down and reassemble anything I own. I think I'm sold on the Ruger concept. I also like the Colt Trooper in .357. Any input on taking down a Colt revolver?
    A man is rich in proportion to the number of things he can afford to let alone. - Henry David Thoreau

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    the rugers are the easiest handguns to service.....and field strip w/o too much trouble. putting them back together is also easy...........after doing it a few times you wll laugh at your concerns.

    take your time and don't force the parts. if it won't disassemble or reassemble just stop, think, and start over.

    the revolvers start with the grips...remove them, capture the main spring with the supplied pin (or use a paper clip), and begin by removing the trigger guard forward. the internal parts pull from the bottom. remove them slowly and watch the transfer bar. note it's location for reassembly.

    each model is similar in disassembly, but slightly individual. advise which model, and i will talk you through.

    happy trails.
    jh

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    Default S&W revolver disassembly

    S&W revolver dis- and re-assembly looks challenging but it isn't that difficult. There are a few tricks to watch like getting the hand spring correct but once you have done it a few times it isn't difficult. If you can't take a S&W apart and put it pack together I'm not certain if you should be even be working on a revolver innards.

    More complex designs are the price you pay for performance. Thr S&W design has proven itself for a hundred years or so. I've looked at many hundreds of used S&Ws over the years including some pretty worn and cruddy ones and is rare to find one that doesn't work. On the other end of the spectrum the Colt SAA is quite simple but isn't dependable at all.
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    Quote Originally Posted by tvfinak View Post
    S&W revolver dis- and re-assembly looks challenging but it isn't that difficult. There are a few tricks to watch like getting the hand spring correct but once you have done it a few times it isn't difficult. If you can't take a S&W apart and put it pack together I'm not certain if you should be even be working on a revolver innards.

    More complex designs are the price you pay for performance. Thr S&W design has proven itself for a hundred years or so. I've looked at many hundreds of used S&Ws over the years including some pretty worn and cruddy ones and is rare to find one that doesn't work. On the other end of the spectrum the Colt SAA is quite simple but isn't dependable at all.
    This was my first go at it. I was a little leary going into it, but like pinehavensredrocket said, take your time, and if it doesn't go together, there's probalby a reason why...

    Definitely pay attention to the handspring. After reassembly, I found I didn't load the handspring and it wouldn't cycle if the barrel was even pointed slightly uphill....

  9. #9

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    take a look at the ruger website. you can download a manual for it. in the mainual it goes through the breakdown of the gun really simple. thats how i learned how to take apart my super redhawk.

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    Default Only looks challenging..

    I wasn't trying to be insulting - just encouraging.

    I took a model 27 a part recently for the first time in a while since I have taken a S&W apart. I remembered the hand spring but had forgotten how I got the bolt spring back in while compressing the spring.

    Don't touch the sear surfaces unless you really know what you are doing but you can clean up some of the double action contact points with a very fine ceramic or oil stone - just a very light polishing. Sometimes you can improve the double action a bit and there isn't much risk. Look at how all the surfaces contact each other acter you remove the side plate.

    Quote Originally Posted by hunt_ak View Post
    This was my first go at it. I was a little leary going into it, but like pinehavensredrocket said, take your time, and if it doesn't go together, there's probalby a reason why...

    Definitely pay attention to the handspring. After reassembly, I found I didn't load the handspring and it wouldn't cycle if the barrel was even pointed slightly uphill....
    Living the urban lifestyle so I can pay my way and for my family's needs, and support my country. And you?
    ".. ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country" JFK

  11. #11

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    I don't know anything about Colts, but I own a Ruge SP101. It's pretty easy to take it apart - the crane, the internals. The manual tells you how to take the major assemblies off, but doesn't tell you the details of going further. All I take it apart for is a deep cleaning once a year or so; I learned not to go any farther than separating the main assemblies, otherwise it gets easy to get it wrong.

    I never polished mine, as that's always asking for trouble. I just let it break in naturally, and kept it clean & oiled. It has a nice action now.
    Tsimshian tribe, wolf clan, the house of Walsk.

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    Smiths are easy if you just take your time. I also bought a book from sportsmans for 25 bucks that has an exploded diagram and some instructions for the breakdown of most popular revolvers. I was able to find many of the same diagrams online at one time or another.

    Smiths aren't bad, just a few little tricks for a few of the parts.

    If anyone is totally stumped, PM me what revolver type you have and I will send you the pages I have on it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AKF View Post
    Smiths are easy if you just take your time. I also bought a book from sportsmans for 25 bucks that has an exploded diagram and some instructions for the breakdown of most popular revolvers. ...
    AKF: what's the title of that book?
    A man is rich in proportion to the number of things he can afford to let alone. - Henry David Thoreau

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    Hey,
    I looked up their website and this is the book I bought at sportsmans warehouse

    http://www.krausebooks.com/product/578/85

    It's a good book but it's not absolutely detailed, just fairly detailed, if that makes sense. I was able to do a complete breakdown and rebuild of my Smith 329pd using the 29's diagrams and instructions.

    Hope that helps.

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    Thanks, AKF! I ordered the book.
    A man is rich in proportion to the number of things he can afford to let alone. - Henry David Thoreau

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