Results 1 to 16 of 16

Thread: What else do I need?

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    64

    Default What else do I need?

    I have a Classic Lee Loader for the a 223.
    What else will I need to get started besides, brass, powder, primers, bullets,
    and manuauls? What tools and gadgets?

  2. #2

    Default

    Kinetic bullet puller, powder scale, loading blocks, primer trays, case lube & lube pad, plastic cartridge boxes...and maybe a log book of some kind to keep a record of your loads. For starters. Safety glasses are also a good idea if you don't wear perscription.

  3. #3
    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Missing Palmer AK in Phonix AZ.
    Posts
    6,416

    Default

    Ammo boxes and labels so you can keep track of what ammo is what. I print my labels on sticky back address label stock with my computer. A good set of digital calipers is very handy. Soon you will want a tumbler and case trimmer of some kind also.

    Andy

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    No. Cal
    Posts
    84

    Default

    And in time after getting everything you need and want, you will be reloading poor like most of us.

    Gun Runner

  5. #5
    Member jakec5253's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    381

    Default trickler

    I would get a powder trickler and small funnel for powder also.

    Jake

  6. #6
    New member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    7

    Default

    Go buy a rcbs rock chucker supreme kit and rock on..

    Everything you need in one box..

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    505

    Default What you need and what you want

    Cutty,

    I did not see a rawhide mallet or heavy leather glove on the list. Some people use a plastic mallet or hard rubber, some prefer a wooden mallet. Something with more "give" than a metal hammer is quieter, at least, and, I think, is more controllable. Another optional nicety is a board for underneath the tool so you don't mar your tabletop.

    If you load with the Lee Classic long enough, the odds may catch up to you and you will set off a primer. A heavy leather glove will save your fingers from burns and bits of primer residue. An oversize pair of safety glasses will protect store-bought lenses as well as the lenses you were born with. (all due respect to gunblade).

    Since you are neck sizing only, you will not need case lube (probably couldn't hurt, though)

    Lee SAYS you don't need a scale, that their dipper will scoop a uniform weight in accord with their index card. I have found that they will scoop a consitent amount each time (if your scooping technique is good), but the weight delivered may be off. Best to have a way to actually measure the charge.

    Loading blocks are not necessary. Fired cases can be kept in a bowl. As each step is completed, put them in another bowl. As you finish each cartridge, you can just put the loaded cartridgs in your ammo boxes as you complete them. Having a pair of loading blocks is nicer, though, as is a funnel to keep the powder going where you want it.

    Ammo boxes are nice, but some use sandwich bags. Just be careful to handle them gently. The boxes are well worth the $3.

    A primer (flipping) tray is nice, but you can use your fingers and a salad plate (just be sure to keep your fingers VERY clean and free of oil; even skin oil can contaminate and kill a primer, though it's unlikely.) On the other hand, Lee's hand priming tool costs less than $20, flips the primers rightside up and feeds them 50 or 100 at a time into the tool, which seats primers with a lever, not a hammer. Lots of people who use presses and can afford any priming tool they choose, choose the Lee Hand Primer.

    You will refine your preferences as you get experience loading and reloading your cartridges. I would buy a minimal setup and buy additional parts as needed. (However, refer to Gunrunnder's post; you can get "reloading poor" pretty fast.) For example, I loaded for 30 years (admittedly, handgun only) without a caliper (vernier or dial and they didn't even have electronics back then) and it was 20 years before I ever had to pull a bullet out of a casing.

    That's all I can think of off the top of my head.

    To sum up, the minimal list (to my mind) is
    1) More than one manual, Start with "The ABC's of Reloading" and "Modern Reloading by Righard Lee" One is easy to read and explains very well what reloading is about. The other will provide deep reading for decades.
    2) Safety glasses
    3) glove
    4) The kit
    5) Mallet of a stiff material, not not as hard as a metal hammer.
    6) 6" square wood board for the tool to sit on
    7) powder scale
    8) a couple more dippers than the single one that comes with the kit
    9) a funnel (which you could make with paper, or skip altogether)

    10) More items only as you discover a use or need for them.

    Good luck,

    Lost Sheep.

  8. #8
    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Missing Palmer AK in Phonix AZ.
    Posts
    6,416

    Default

    What you need or want past the basic stuff will depend on things we don't know yet, so if you could answer the following we could zero in better.

    1~ Are your loading goals more to improve your accuracy, save money on ammo, or some of both? You will want a powder trickler and good scale to weigh every charge, and every bullet if you are looking for best accuracy. If just plinking around, then you can make good ammo without these and use scoops or metering bars.

    2~ Are you only gonna stick to just .223, or do you intend to branch out later? If branching out then it's best we keep that in mind so we don't have you spend any of your money unwisely someplace along the way.

    3~ Loading all for the same gun, or more than one gun .223? If it's just the one gun there are some things you can skip if you want.

    So if you could. . . tell us what your wanting to do, tell the story of why you are reloading and answer the questions along the way.

    My funnel is a 22-250 brass cut off and stuck to a little coper funnel, my Grandpa made it and I got it from him back in the 70's . . . it works great for me. You would want a .17 caliber brass of some kind for a 223, but I just thought I would point out that paper is not the only DIY funnel.

    Andy

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    2,448

    Default

    a good scale is very important!

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    80

    Default

    Do some independent home work. Buy a Sinclair International "Precision Reloading & Shooting Handbook."

    http://www.sinclairintl.com/shooting.html

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    80

    Default

    Here is another great site for your home work.

    http://www.varmintal.com/arelo.htm

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    64

    Default Change of direction

    Ok, I went over a buddy's and watched him reload on a RCBS press, pretty sweet. I will probably end up reloading for the 223, 243, and 45 Colt revolver.
    So maybe leaning to getting a RCBS kit. Will Lee dies work on the rcbs press?
    Do the rcbs shell holders work with lee dies? Do many of you use lee dies with
    rcbs? And if so, are they the full length pacesetter dies for 223/243?
    Basically I want to start reloading because I would enjoy it, maybe save some
    cash down the road. I build my own flyrods, tie my own flies, make my own arrows, So I gotta reload my own and start another hobby.
    Thanks for all the info, love this site.
    Keep it coming.
    Merry X-Mas to all!

  13. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Eureka MT
    Posts
    3,048

    Default

    Now your on the right track. Get the rcbs or Hornady or Lyman or even Look at the Lee classic cast which can be bought for about $90. Anyway get one of the kits by who ever and you will save quite a bit over buying the individual pieces. Yes you can mix and match as far as dies and shell holders on most all of the current single stage presses. As far as saving money, I doubt it. You will just shoot a lot more for the same money. Reloading is horribly addictive, kind of like tying flys, building arrows and such. You really don't save money , you just get more bang for your buck.

  14. #14
    Member jakec5253's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    381

    Default lee dies

    I have some lee dies for a few pistol calibers, and haven't had a problem with them. I use Redding dies for rifles. They aren't that much more than the Lee dies, and I think are better quality.

    Jake

  15. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    505

    Default Uh-oh

    Quote Originally Posted by cutty View Post
    Ok, I went over a buddy's and watched him reload on a RCBS press, pretty sweet. I will probably end up reloading for the 223, 243, and 45 Colt revolver.
    So maybe leaning to getting a RCBS kit. Will Lee dies work on the rcbs press?
    Do the rcbs shell holders work with lee dies? Do many of you use lee dies with
    rcbs? And if so, are they the full length pacesetter dies for 223/243?
    Basically I want to start reloading because I would enjoy it, maybe save some
    cash down the road. I build my own flyrods, tie my own flies, make my own arrows, So I gotta reload my own and start another hobby.
    Thanks for all the info, love this site.
    Keep it coming.
    Merry X-Mas to all!
    And a Happy New Year to you, too.

    Uh-oh. You have caught the disease, the magnificent affliction.

    Welcome to your new obsession.

    With a few exceptions, any die set will work with any press. I won't go into the few exceptions, but with the calibers you have named you are pretty much set. When you buy a set of Lee dies, you get a Lee Shell Holder with it, which will work fine with the RCBS press' ram. If you buy RCBS dies, you have to buy a shell holder separately, but anybody's shell holder will work just fine.

    The die sets are sold as a complete set for sizing, depriming, bullet seating, crimping, etc. Mixing manufacturers for the equipment is quite commonplace. Mixing individual dies from different manufacturers' die sets is less common, but, if done with care and awareness, OK, too.

    When just starting out, best to buy a complete 3-die or 4-die set and not swap parts. Exception is the bullet seating stem (different ones for different shaped bullets) and a crimping die if you are picky about the crimp you get with the standard die.

    Get a copy of "The ABC's of Reloading" and study it. Not much loading data, but lots of insight into the loading process. Get a couple of other loading manuals and read the early chapters of each. Ignore the loading data, the early chapters describe the loading process and each different manual has different writing styles and emphasis, so you will get a more balanced understanding the wider your exposure.

    You may not save any money reloading, but you will get to shoot a whole lot more, become a better shot and have the pride of having made your own ammunition. You will also smell better and have whiter teeth.

    Lost Sheep

    Remember, only believe half of what you see and one quarter of what you hear. That goes double for what you get from the internet.

  16. #16
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    SwampView AK, Overlooking Mt. Mckinley and Points Beyond.
    Posts
    8,815

    Default

    Kits are fine, but I'd jist about betcha that there'd be things in it that you wouldn't use, and some you would need that ain’t thar.

    Please find my immensely valuable List below.

    Smitty of the North

    Minimal, but Adequate Handloading List
    * Press (If you are loading a large bottle-necked case, get a heavy press)
    * Dies (For the cartridge you will be loading)
    * Shell Holder (One that fits your cartridge case)
    * Case Lube
    * Rag.
    * Primer Pocket Cleaning Tool (You could use a slotted screwdriver of the right size.)
    (Better yet, use a Primer Pocket Uniformer.)
    * Dial Caliper (To measure case length)
    * Case Trimmer (You will need one eventually.)
    * Chamfer Tool
    * Primer Seater (The press may have a primer arm to seat primers with.)
    * Powder Scale (Even if you were using a powder measure, you’d need a scale to set it.)
    * Powder Funnel
    * Loading Data

    Gee, I hope I didn't forget something.
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •