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Thread: Hooks for bead fishing

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    Member garnede's Avatar
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    Post Hooks for bead fishing

    I have not fished with beads before but I want to try this next year. What is everyones favorite hook to use behind beads and why? Also where can I buy them, either on the net or in anchorage?
    It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

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    Member G_Smolt's Avatar
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    Beading hooks are a matter of personal preference, target species, economic bracket, and availability.

    If you are a straight-tie guy, then straight-eye hooks like the TMC 105 or gamakatsu c15s are the gold-standard. Other makes include the Mustad 9174, Cabela's #26, and Daiichi x510.

    If snelling is your preference, then the options are much wider. Popular hooks include gamakatsu octopus, VMC octopus, Owner mosquito, Daiichi 1150, Kamasan 983B...the list goes on.

    Alaska Fly Fishing Goods has an extensive bead section, and we are in the process of adding several different hook lines to the website.

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    Member garnede's Avatar
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    I would gess I am in the straight tie bracket. I honestly do not know what the benifitt of one method over the other is when pertaning to bead fishing.
    It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

    http://wouldieatitagainfoodblog.blogspot.com/

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    Member alaskachuck's Avatar
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    Im a straight tie guy. I use Gamagatsu hooks. I like the bright silver ones not the red ones.. Just my opinion. Size, sheeeesh I shop for them by sight. 8 maybe. Ill check when i get home as im at the farm having a xmas beer. I do use the colored toothpicks though. I but a box and pull all the reds and oranges out and peg my beads with the pick that is close to the bead color. anal yes. does it matter, who knows. I do know when i feel confident in my setup I catch fish. When Im doubting it i dont. Just like a drift. You know when it is a good one.

    Fishaplooza 09
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  5. #5
    Member G_Smolt's Avatar
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    Snelling provides a straight-line connection between the bead and the hook, whereas straight tie does not.

    Straight-tie is easy and fast, whereas snelling involves a more complex knot.

    So...for straight-tie, my personal favorite is the Gamakatsu C14s. I have landed steelhead on 8's and 10's with a little nervousness and trepidation but very few actual problems. 2nd on the list would be the Tiemco 105, and 3rd would be the Daiichi x510. The x510 is a heavier hook than I like to use, which is why I rated it 3rd, but other than that they are good. Some brands and hooks to stay away from unless absolutely necessary would be Mustad (crappy points, steel far too brittle) Cabela's (fit and finish suck, steel far too soft), and generic hooks in general.

    Hope this helps.

  6. #6
    Member jakec5253's Avatar
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    Default bead hooks

    I like the tiemco 2457 for bead fishing.

    Jake

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    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    I used the Tiemco's TMC 2499- SPBL #8 and really liked them. Admittingly new to bead fishing, but these hooks worked well.
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

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    Member G_Smolt's Avatar
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    The problem with scud-style hooks (downturned eye) is that the eye closes off part of the hook gap, resulting in less gap available to hit the jaw, which results in fewer and more tenuous hookups.

    This doesn't mean that they don't work...all hooks work to some degree.

    Some just work better than others.

  9. #9

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    Good analysis so far.

    Another consideration: the species and location where you'll fish. In SE Alaska, where the quarry are Dollies and cutts that are mixed in with lunking spawning chums, I prefer a more light-wire hook that will often straighten out if I inadvertently snag a chum. I'd rather straighten out a hook than bust off an entire rig. For this purpose I like Daiichi hooks (sorry, can't remember the model; it's a straight-eye hook)

    I don't have experience with 30" rainbows in BBay or Kenai, but my guess is in those places a hook with heavier wire (Tiempco?) is more appropriate.

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    Member garnede's Avatar
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    Thanks to everyone for the help. I will print out a list and take it with me next time I head to mountian view sports. Then I will look at each suggestion and decide what I think I want to use.
    It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

    http://wouldieatitagainfoodblog.blogspot.com/

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    I would have to agree with Jake on this. Out of all the different hooks I've tried over the years I like the Tiemco 2457. I also pinch the barbs down. I found that you don't really lose that many more fish and it's much easier to remove from the fishes mouth while doing minimal damage to the fish. Also much easier to remove from myself when I catch myself! The other feature with the TMC2457 is the straight point which has less of a tendency to snag spawning salmon while drifting through them in pursuit of Hawg 'Bows and Dollies.

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    Quote Originally Posted by alaskachuck View Post
    Im a straight tie guy. I use Gamagatsu hooks. I like the bright silver ones not the red ones.. Just my opinion. Size, sheeeesh I shop for them by sight. 8 maybe. Ill check when i get home as im at the farm having a xmas beer. I do use the colored toothpicks though. I but a box and pull all the reds and oranges out and peg my beads with the pick that is close to the bead color. anal yes. does it matter, who knows. I do know when i feel confident in my setup I catch fish. When Im doubting it i dont. Just like a drift. You know when it is a good one.

    Fishaplooza 09
    as far as color goes I usually stick to the black hooks, under the assumption of reduced sight......
    how about the peg-its? I've made the switch from toothpicks to them and so far I've been pretty happy with them.

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