Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Savage Bolts

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Salcha, Alaska
    Posts
    116

    Default Savage Bolts

    I'm looking at a Savage 340 in .223 for coyote/wolf. I'm concerned about the bolt though. This is an older (80's) gun, and it looks like there's plastic or some sort of composite used in the bolt.

    Does anyone know anything about Savage bolts? If I'm firing this weapon at -30, will it hold up?

    Thanks,

    j

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Arizona Baby!
    Posts
    485

    Default

    I had one back in the early 90's that I picked up for a little over $100. Rounds would consistently stick and it had a broken extractor when I picked it up.
    I had the extractor replaced but still had probelms with stuck cases and practically gave it away as I did not have the cash to have a gunsmith work on it at the time.
    I ended up buying a used Remington 788 in 22-250 which I still have.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Salcha, Alaska
    Posts
    116

    Default Thanks PRDTR

    Thanks for the info...it seems to be a very accurate rifle, I'm just concerned about the bolt, your input has definitely swayed me away from it.

  4. #4
    Member pinehavensredrocket's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    wisconsin
    Posts
    759

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by salchastar View Post
    I'm looking at a Savage 340 in .223 for coyote/wolf. I'm concerned about the bolt though. This is an older (80's) gun, and it looks like there's plastic or some sort of composite used in the bolt.

    Does anyone know anything about Savage bolts? If I'm firing this weapon at -30, will it hold up?

    Thanks,

    j
    actually the model 340 was intended to be a lo-priced bolt action repeater chambered for two varmint cartridges and one medium game round. this rifle has been in use since 1950 in several basic models...340 342, stevens 322, and 325 as well as the springfield 840. they were discontinued in 1985.

    for their cost they were a reliable an accurate rifle. still common, they can be purchased at a very reasonable cost and make a fine snowmachine rifle. accuracy is par with other bolt actions.

    great loaner rifle for the brother-in-law!

    happy trails.
    jh

  5. #5
    Member KRS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    362

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pinehavensredrocket View Post
    great loaner rifle for the brother-in-law!
    That's funny right there.

    If it's been around since '80 then it's probably allright.

    KRS

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Salcha, Alaska
    Posts
    116

    Default Use in the cold?

    Pinehaven - you've used it in the cold then? How did it function? What was the lowest temp?

    v/r

    ss

  7. #7
    Member pinehavensredrocket's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    wisconsin
    Posts
    759

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by salchastar View Post
    Pinehaven - you've used it in the cold then? How did it function? What was the lowest temp?

    v/r

    ss
    i have owned and used them in 30-30 and .222 caliber and have found them to be a pretty good rifle. very basic and plain, but a good shooter they were used for deer and varmints (coyote through the winter). i'm not sure about the lowest temps as wisconsin winters probably don't rival interior alaska. however, it is a standard bolt action and should be reliable if cold weather precautions are taken.

    jh

  8. #8

    Default

    I have a Stevens 325 in 30-30. Nice shooting rifle. Two things to be aware of. The bolt has a single lug up front and a deep notch that the bolt handle rests in. And with the front barrel band feature you cannot use a hasty sling as it will mess with the point of impact. Almost missed a mule deer buck one season because of this.
    Justin

  9. #9

    Default

    I am very familiar with the Savage 340 family. They are in the same class as the Remington 788 in that they are very accurate. The weak point is as you have already eluded to ....the extractor. That being said I have never seen an extractor broken shooting factory fodder. I have replaced several over the years and in each and every case it was a 223. I asked to see the spent cartridge and the ones that were available showed signs of excess pressure. Usually evidence that someone that was trying to get their 223 to perform like a 22-250. I wouldn't be surprised if if the dies used when reloading didn't have something to do with it as well. Standard 223 dies vs small base dies.

    If your shooting factory ammo or from a reliable commercial reloader....Blackhills, Ultramax etc you should be fine.

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Salcha, Alaska
    Posts
    116

    Default Thank you...

    Thanks elmer,

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •