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Thread: duplexes as rangefinder for black bear

  1. #1
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    Default duplexes as rangefinder for black bear

    Is there an average height from spine to belly for a black bear in the spring. Deer hunting I would fit the body between the duplexes to estimate range. Is that of any use with bears or are their sizes vary to much?

  2. #2
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    Default how far...

    Most bears are similar in size on average in the spring. You have from 14 to 16 inches from top of spine to belly to deal with. You probably know that a 6 power scope subtends about 8 or 9 inches at 300 yards...which is the same amount most .400 or so BC projectiles drop when sighted in at 200 yards, when loaded to around 2,700 fps.(180 grn. 30.06, 225 grn. .338 etc.) Makes it easy, yes?

    bhtr

  3. #3
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    Yes, in my opinion the size of bears varies too much. I much prefer to use a range finder on Alaskan game.

    Bearhuntr has it right. I tend to sight my rifles in for a 250 yard zero which puts me dead in the kill zone from 0-300 yards..about 3.25" high at 100 yards with my 30-06, 180 grain bullets. I found early on that if I told myself to hold high or low I held WAY too far low or high and that resulted in misses. Friends of mine that are professional guides say the same thing happens to them and clients all the time. I hit the animal with the range finder..if it's less than 300 I hold right where I want to hit and shoot. Simple.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

  4. #4
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    Smile rangefinder

    I agree with AKDoug about the size varying making reticle estimation less useful and a rangefinder a better option for bear. I learned this the hard way after I located a bear in PWS on the beach. It was my first bear hunt with my new rangefinder. Then I realized my rangefinder was back in the tent. Not a big deal as it was the perfect shot across water and looked very close. I used the reticle, trees and size of bear to estimate distance and called it 300 yards. I crawled to the waters edge, put my coat on a rock, waited for the bear to step out from behind a rock and squeezed off a round. The bear jumped up a steep bank into the woods at the shot. No big deal...wait for my ride to go collect my bear. Well it turned out to be a huge bear by the tracks and a clean miss after following the trail for a long ways in the deep snow. I returned the next day to hunt the spot with my rangefinder and it was 406 which explained the clean miss. So I recommend a rangefinder which you attach to your coat if you are forgetful like me. I have seen absolutely tiny black bears and also very large ones and bears with long coats and thin coats...
    I come home with an honestly earned feeling that something good has taken place. It makes no difference whether I got anything, it has to do with how the day was spent. Fred Bear

  5. #5
    Member Vince's Avatar
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    one bear will vary between spring summer and fall... just in weight loss over the winter with long hair and shedding in the summer. he is pathetic and filled out in the fall ... they VARY a lot
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

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  6. #6
    Member pinehavensredrocket's Avatar
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    assuming a 200 yd zero try this.............use the intersection of the "thin wire" with the lower post as your aiming point on the brisket. out to about 400 yds this will result in a solid lung shot, and eliminates hold-over.

    wayne van zwoll speaks to this in his book elk rifles, cartridges and hunting tactics. (page 116-117) this is a good read....full of "meat" not some gunrag balony.

    check it out.

    happy trails.
    jh

  7. #7

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    Som game animals will have fairly consistant sizes and some will vary. I agree with others that there is a lot of size variation with bears and a gree that a range finder is the way to go if you cant afford a range finder or dont have the time to use for the shot than zero your rifle to at least 200 yds or more depending on the trajectory. I zero my 180 bullets moving at 3000 fps at 200 yds. I know that at 300 yds my bullets are 6 in low. If I esimate a target at 300 yds I hold just below the back. If i missjudge 50 yds too short I will still hit the lower vital area. If I miss judge 50 or 100 yds too long, I will still make a fatal hit.

    This last Sat I shot an elk at about 200 yds. I held a little high just in case it was farther but not over the back, about 6 in down and I hit it in the lower part of the spine, about 6 in down.

    Good hunting

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