Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 34

Thread: What do you do if...?

  1. #1
    Member COtoAK's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    North Pole, Alaska
    Posts
    1,896

    Question What do you do if...?

    I have really been wanting to ask this question for quite sometime.
    It's really a question on ethics.

    What do you do when you accidently hit a bald eagle?

    It's possible, right? You are driving down the Parks Hwy. You see them on the side of the road. I have heard of truckers that are just driving and a bald eagle just smacks their windshield or their driver side window.

    I hear many jokes about this very thing and I wanted to know opinions, laws, statutes... I don't mind... either, entertain me, on your personal thoughts about what to do.

    The right in me tells me that I should go ahead and report it, but in my gut if I knew that I'd lose my hunting license and if it were to be a true accident, that would be a tough one. I'd be scared. Let alone I am sure there would be massive fines, fees, and community service.

    So... respond. I'd like to see your take on it.
    Lurker.

  2. #2
    Member GrassLakeRon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Grass Lake Michigan
    Posts
    1,978

    Wink

    Well,

    Since this didn't happen to you....

    Stuff Happens, I would report it as a bird hitting my windshield. Birds I have notice don't have good depth perception when you are driving above 70 mph. They don't generally fly away. Now if a trucker's side wind blew one up to your windshield....You should not have an issue. Report it, try and save the bird.

    Ron

  3. #3
    Member COtoAK's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    North Pole, Alaska
    Posts
    1,896

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GrassLakeRon View Post
    Well,

    Since this didn't happen to you....

    Stuff Happens, I would report it as a bird hitting my windshield. Birds I have notice don't have good depth perception when you are driving above 70 mph. They don't generally fly away. Now if a trucker's side wind blew one up to your windshield....You should not have an issue. Report it, try and save the bird.

    Ron
    But don't you think that because they are a protected species that there would be a huge environmental issue with it.

    Looks like we are not the only board that has talked of this before:
    http://www.huntingpa.com/forums/ubbt...&Number=698396

    Now... I know the story to be true because it was a friend of my dad. More like... his best friend. They trucked together and the bald eagle hit my dad's friend's big rig.
    I just listened to my dad's story. I am positive that it wasn't a tall tale or a myth or even just a story for a farce.

    So... ?!
    Lurker.

  4. #4
    Member Rock_skipper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Deltajct
    Posts
    2,499

    Default

    CotoAk, I don't think there is an issue here. An accident is what it boils down to, same as hitting a moose. They are talking about taking the Bald Eagle off the endangered list if they hav'nt done so already. My 2 cents. You can't control nature if it wants to fly into your vehicle.

  5. #5
    Member Phish Finder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Searching for more cowbell!
    Posts
    1,945

    Default

    Call fish and game and give the mile marker (if on the highway).
    ><((((>.`..`.. ><((((>`..`.><((((>

    "People who drink light 'beer' don't like the taste of beer; they
    just like to pee a lot." --Capitol Brewery

  6. #6
    Member COtoAK's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    North Pole, Alaska
    Posts
    1,896

    Default

    I'd still be apprehensive, though.
    "Hello, State Trooper. I had an accident with a Bald Eagle. I was on the Denali Hwy at about 56 Mile from Cantwell. I didn't know what to do with the remains, so I bagged it and left it on the side of the highway with a cross and used some spray paint on the dirt road pointing to the cross to determine where exactly it happened."
    Doesn't something like that sound incredibly fishy?
    I know that accidents happen, but when accidents happen, someone always gets cited and from the looks of it, that poor bald eagle isn't the one that's getting the ticket, fees, or court date.
    So... anyone with laws or statutes on what to do?
    Lurker.

  7. #7
    Member Phish Finder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Searching for more cowbell!
    Posts
    1,945

    Default

    I hit an eagle in Ketchikan about 10 years ago. I called the troopers, and told them what happened. They asked where. That was it.
    ><((((>.`..`.. ><((((>`..`.><((((>

    "People who drink light 'beer' don't like the taste of beer; they
    just like to pee a lot." --Capitol Brewery

  8. #8
    Member COtoAK's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    North Pole, Alaska
    Posts
    1,896

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Phish Finder View Post
    I hit an eagle in Ketchikan about 10 years ago. I called the troopers, and told them what happened. They asked where. That was it.
    Wow!? Right place, right time?
    That's amazing? In Ketchikan?
    Are you trying to say, Phish, that if we EVER hit a bald eagle, it should only be in Ketchikan?
    :D
    Lurker.

  9. #9
    Member big_dog60's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    between wasilla and palmer
    Posts
    1,061

    Default

    I wouldn't think it would be any different then hitting a raven. Some times things like that happen. It shouldn't be a legal problem.

  10. #10
    New member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by COtoAK View Post
    But don't you think that because they are a protected species that there would be a huge environmental issue with it.
    No. It's not like you're swerving all over the highway 'trying' to hit the bird. Like was said earlier, accidents happen. Think of it as feeding a coyote or wolf. If the drivers conscience got the best of them, then they should call the troopers and tell them what happened like phish finder did.

  11. #11
    Moderator kingfisherktn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Ketchikan, AK
    Posts
    4,076

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Heavy 1 View Post
    No. It's not like you're swerving all over the highway 'trying' to hit the bird. Like was said earlier, accidents happen. Think of it as feeding a coyote or wolf. If the drivers conscience got the best of them, then they should call the troopers and tell them what happened like phish finder did.

    I've heard she actually drives like that.;)

  12. #12
    Member COtoAK's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    North Pole, Alaska
    Posts
    1,896

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kingfisherktn View Post
    I've heard she actually drives like that.;)
    How did you know?!??!
    Not for bald eagles. Only for people that live in Ketchikan. :D
    Lurker.

  13. #13
    Moderator kingfisherktn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Ketchikan, AK
    Posts
    4,076

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by COtoAK View Post
    How did you know?!??!
    Not for bald eagles. Only for people that live in Ketchikan. :D
    You posted car pictures.:)

  14. #14
    Member Huntress's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Somewhere between here and there.....
    Posts
    1,173

    Default

    CO....Like it was said before, it was an accident. If it dies and you can stop to pick it up I would scoop it up and take it into your local fish and game. Dead birds are sent out and turned into native handy crafts. This is straight from a Wildlife troopers mouth.
    "In the interest of protecting my privacy I will no longer be accepting Private Messages generated from this site and if you email me, it better be good!"

  15. #15
    Member GreenTea's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Palmer, Alaska
    Posts
    92

    Default

    Even trains hit eagles in Alaska. Collect the carcass and turn it in to the Troopers, who will pass it on to Native Alaskans. To be even safer, just leave it for the Troopers to pick up. Natives are the only people authorized to posses eagle feathers - including the ones hanging from all those rear view mirrors in all those vehicles around the state.

  16. #16
    Member JOAT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Soldotna, ALASKA since '78
    Posts
    3,720

    Default Non-Issue... really.

    By your mentioning of taking away your hunting license, I believe you are confusing 2 separate issues. A collision with any wild animal with a vehicle is a straight forward accident that has zilch to do with your hunting license. Failure to report that accident would be the only case where you would have anything to fear.

    Now, on the other hand if you were out grouse hunting or something and a bird flew up from a thicket as you're walking the woods and you point, shoot, and hit said bird... which turns out to be, let's say an immature eagle that was on a rodent kill... now even though you might call that an "accident", it would actually be negligence and would carry penalties.

    I hit an owl one night with my pickup as I was driving the Sterling Hwy near Cooper Landing around 2am. As I rounded a corner, an owl suddenly swooped right into my headlights. He was just as surprised as I was and we were both braking and making course corrections at the same time. As he was in a full flaps power out maneuver, his chest hit the passenger side headlight just before he gained altitude and went over the top of the truck. As it was the tight corners around Cooper Landing, I wasn't going very fast and had braked down quite a bit before the impact. I stopped and looked all over the ditches and treeline to see if he was injured or something, but never did find him. So I suspect (or hope) that he wasn't seriously injured. However, had I found an injured owl, I certainly would have reported it to the Troopers.

    I wouldn't hesitate to report or take a dead eagle to the Troopers.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

  17. #17
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks, AK
    Posts
    122

    Default No worries

    For one, the State of Alaska is not the manager of Bald Eagles, it's the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service that manages migratory birds and/or federally listed species. The bald eagle has been removed from the federal list (it was never on the Alaska state list) so legally its no different than hitting a robin. If you turn it in to the local F&G office, they will either put it in the freezer and maybe someday have it mounted for display, once the proper permits are acquired, see if the state vet wants it for anything, call the USFWS and ask them if they want it, or bag it and trash it.
    The wildlife troopers aren't going to have much interest in it unless there's evidence that refutes your claim of hitting it, but if you are on the up-and-up and self report, why should they be suspicious? If someone did shoot one, it eventually ends up as a federal court case.
    So assuming I hit one, I'd check and make sure if it was dead or unconscious or what. If dead, I'd get it off the road if I can safely do that, I may call the USFWS but I'd probably drive off and let a fox have it. If still alive, I'd have to decide at the moment what is most appropriate, but getting a government official involved would be the top priority.
    As far as losing your hunting license, that isn't going to happen. Nor would fines, fees or community service.
    Blair

  18. #18
    Member SoggyMountain's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Bait Station, Alaska 99801
    Posts
    861

    Default Meet Zipper

    CO, in addition to running into cars, and houses, eagles occasionally crash into the ground.

    This one I rescued in 1989 while a friend and I were bear hunting.

    When I spotted him on the ground, I told my friend we should rescue it. But, he was very afraid to offer any assistance. Partly because of the issues you site, and partly because he had run afoul of the game laws a few years earlier. He was sure "THEY" would blame us for the bird's injuries.

    Two years ago I had a similar opportunity to rescue a bird, but, in that case, I already had two 30 plus lb. kings to carry up the cliff - I told that story here.

    What I did do was call the raptor center, and they dispatched a couple volunteers to come out for him.

    Your local vets will know who is best to contact in the area for rescue. If it is dead, you really don't need to report it.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    "...just because we didn't agree with you doesn't mean we didn't have good discussion. It just means you missed it." -JMG-

  19. #19
    Supporting Member bullbuster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Mean streets of Fairview
    Posts
    1,140

    Unhappy It happened to me

    I was following a semi across Potter Flats watching an eagle crossing the marsh. As it crossed the highway it was hit by the trailer in front of me and cartwheeled to the side of the road.
    I stopped and checked, it was dead. Being so clean and fresh I picked it up and took it to the office for some pictures before heading over to Fish & Game. (Pics on work puter)
    They weren't too friendly. The first thing out of their mouth was "You can't have that!" I explained the situation and that I was here to give it to them. They would not accept it and called the Feds. They told me it was up to the Feds what would happen to me for possessing a protected carcass. I was instructed not to leave.
    I sat there for an hour before the Feds showed up. He heard my story, gave me a lecture, then threw it in a garbage bag and left. I never heard what happened to it after that. I had to fill out some forms.
    The bad feeling I was left with was nothing compared to the one I had the next weekend. I was crossing K Bay in my skiff when I heard a thump. Looking back I saw that I had hit an otter. I immediately spun around and dragged it on board. I sat there thinking that if I turn this beautiful animal in they are going to accuse me of "collecting" endangered species. I called a native buddy and asked him if I could give it to him, he said "We better not, if you get caught transporting it you would go to jail."
    Right or wrong, I let it slide back into the ocean and will never forget the feeling of waste. :(
    Live life and love it
    Love life and live it

  20. #20
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,957

    Default

    All eagle carcasses, feathers, etc. are suppose to be send to a central depository, I think its in Colorado, then native people submit requests for them. The parts are then sent out to the requestor. Eagles also get electrocuted occasionally and generally, that's what happens to them.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •