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Thread: offhand shooting help

  1. #1
    Member rimfirematt's Avatar
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    Default offhand shooting help

    Ive been shooting offhand alot latley. Mostly my muzzloaders but also some rimfires. This is kind of a whole new world to me. Been kind of a bench guy most of my life, or at least a rest user.

    Anyone have any tips with regards to offhand shooting, links or book recomendations?

    So far I have found this http://www.muzzleloadingforum.com/fu...hp?tid/222422/ Im not sure you guys will be able to view it though unless you are a member of that site.

    Anway reading this article it seems that I have been doing everything completley wrong.

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by rimfirematt View Post
    Ive been shooting offhand alot latley. Mostly my muzzloaders but also some rimfires. This is kind of a whole new world to me. Been kind of a bench guy most of my life, or at least a rest user.

    Anyone have any tips with regards to offhand shooting, links or book recomendations?

    So far I have found this http://www.muzzleloadingforum.com/fu...hp?tid/222422/ Im not sure you guys will be able to view it though unless you are a member of that site.

    Anway reading this article it seems that I have been doing everything completley wrong.
    Hey Matt,

    My strongest recommendation for offhand practice is to get a decent quality air rifle, then shoot it 20 rounds a night at home. It's going to teach you more about trigger squeeze, and especially about follow through, than anything else you can shoot. By the time you go through a single can of pellets you are going to be a better offhand shot than is possible using any other arm, in my book. You just can't beat that nightly practice, and you certainly aren't going to get it with anything but an air rifle.

    For indoor home use and best practice all around, you don't want one of the 1000+ fps magnums. Just too darned noisy. I'd say 800 fps or less is ideal. Slower is better for longer "dwell time" of the pellet in the barrel to help emphasize the followthrough issue. I got the Beeman R7 and it is probably more accurate than any sporter weight 22 rimfires. It's rated around 700 fps.

  3. #3
    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    I do it like the Marines taught me. Start the gun above target 12 0 clock and drop slowly through the target pulling the trigger just as you hit 6 O clock.Hold you breath after you start the drop.Thousand have been killed by Marines useing this form. The recoil from the rifle sets you up for the next shot.

  4. #4

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    I've had some good results in the past shooting offhand being able to consistantly hit a 12" disk at 300 yds.

    Everyone is different, and built differently and should find the right techniques and positions for their own body's abilty to be comfortatble and relaxed.

    In my case, I hold my rifle with my fingertips (left hand) with the palm of my hand being almost 2" below the botttom plate of my mag. My index finger supports the forearm just infront of the mag. The other 3 fingers ballance the right side of the stock while my thumb ballances the stock on the otherside, opposite of my ring finger and just forward of the trigger guard. This is a little aft the ballance point of my rifle but it allows me to rest the back of my upper arm on my side for a more stable platform. I lean slightly back from the waist with front (left) leg fairly straight and just a very slight (almost un-noticable) bend in my back leg. For me, this is my most comfortable and stable offhand position.

    Also, unless your body parts are made of steel and hydraulic jonts you will always have some movement, so the trick is to break the trigger at the right time when your cross hairs or sights move through the target. I have never tried Amigo Will's technique but it sounds interesting.

    I also practice dry firing a lot to build muscle memory and coordination.

    One other thing... often in hunting situations your body will be somewhat fatigued and maybe winded and more difficult to hold steady. It doesn't hurt to practice holding and maybe dry firing when in the field with pack and gear or do some calastentics at the range.

    Hope this helps.

  5. #5

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    http://www.scribd.com/doc/2411860/Offhand-Holding-Drill

    Heres a good drill

    Lawton and Tubbs are proven performers offhand

    Offhand is my weakest position, so I practice it the most.
    I shoot 9 out of 10 into the ten ring on the SR target 200 yds with an iron sighted AR15.

    Physical conditioning helps a whole bunch, both aerobic and weights.

    Dry fire, air rifle and snapping in drills, such as dry fire, hold the rifle in position for one minute, 20 times.

    Good luck!

  6. #6
    Charterboat Operator kodiakcombo's Avatar
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    Default pelletgun

    A pellet gun with/without scope and depending on what your after size wise, I hang a sturdy can from a branch with downrigger wire along with a sturdy lid so it kinda looks like a wind chime. Then shoot 30 to 40 rounds a day. The target is visible from my kitchen window and I take 2 or 3 shot at a time. The breeze will move the target but constinue the steady fall over the target. This prepares me for small target, like the heads of marine mammals or head shots for deer. It seems to build the muscles needed to hold, sometime the marine mammals submerge for a second and pop back up and wham! I start at 12 and slowly fall down, I also do side to side. good luck.

  7. #7
    Member Alangaq's Avatar
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    Ok, so one of the “shooting drills” that I practice at home involves the use of………….. miniature animals. Yes I am fully aware of how utterly ridiculous that sounds, but for me at least it seems to help, and makes practice a bit more realistic and interesting. Fortunately for me, I am blessed with three young boys, so the inventory of critters available for “shooting practice” is quite extensive indeed, although shot placement skills for a triceratops or iguanodon may not have much in the way of useful modern application, it does make for a nice brake from the other more commonly encountered animals.

    Ok, seriously. I set these little guys up in the garage (most toy stores carry them) in all kinds of different position to simulate what one may encounter in the field. Then I practice from the different shooting position, including of course the standing position. Sight picture, a steady hold, consistent trigger pull, good follow thru, and proper bullet placement are the goals of this exercise. Naturally this is all done with dry fire as the boys would not be happy about pellet damage to their critters!

    Don’t laugh………. Its more fun that looking at a stupid white dot on the wall……..
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  8. #8

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    All of my off hand shooting outside of practicing with plastic quart jars filled with water (four in a row the number of shots my 06 mag holds) at 100yds is when I am hunting. Practice is as many have said, the key to shooting off hand and being successful. I have a sling I practice with and also practice with out the sling because some shots have to be taken very quickly. I practice with the quart jars by starting from the rifle at rest then move it to the shoulder and gain my target in the sight picture and fire, then bolt my Mark V without it leaving the shoulder and fire as fast as I can regain my next target until all four targets are dispatched. I like to get three groups of four jars without a miss before I end my practice. It has paid off in the field through the years using this means of practice and has allowed me to take game on the run in open fields, the last being a deer flat out in a bean field at 175yds and my 06 rolled him up. My brother-in-law was impressed and I told him it was because of my practice that I was able to hit the deer.
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  9. #9

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    Like others I use a pellet gun. I do a session at least once a week.

    I have had to stop on occasion for several months+ and when I start up again it never ceases to amaze me how quickly my shooting has deteriorated and how quickly it starts to improve after only a few sessions with the pellet gun.

  10. #10

    Default animals

    Quote Originally Posted by Alangaq View Post
    Ok, so one of the “shooting drills” that I practice at home involves the use of………….. miniature animals. Yes I am fully aware of how utterly ridiculous that sounds, but for me at least it seems to help, and makes practice a bit more realistic and interesting. Fortunately for me, I am blessed with three young boys, so the inventory of critters available for “shooting practice” is quite extensive indeed, although shot placement skills for a triceratops or iguanodon may not have much in the way of useful modern application, it does make for a nice brake from the other more commonly encountered animals.

    Ok, seriously. I set these little guys up in the garage (most toy stores carry them) in all kinds of different position to simulate what one may encounter in the field. Then I practice from the different shooting position, including of course the standing position. Sight picture, a steady hold, consistent trigger pull, good follow thru, and proper bullet placement are the goals of this exercise. Naturally this is all done with dry fire as the boys would not be happy about pellet damage to their critters!

    Don’t laugh………. Its more fun that looking at a stupid white dot on the wall……..

    animal crackers glued on a taget, aspirins in the fire place are fun too, wiht the pellet gun..

  11. #11

    Thumbs up David Tubb

    David Tubb can shoot. He has several books out and explains the science/art of "approaching the target" when shooting off hand. It's worth reading. A good pellet gun and a full sized .22 with proper practice helps a bunch.

  12. #12
    Member RMiller's Avatar
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    Also focus on the front sight.

    I used to always try to perfectly align the front and rear sights together but was never a good shot. I then read an article about focusing on the front sight and the target as the rear sight will fall into place and my shooting improved greatly.
    "You have given out too much reputation in the last 24 hours, try again later".

  13. #13

    Talking Offhand shooting

    Some good advice on here already. I learned to shoot when I was a boy, using a Daisy BB gun--and as far as I can remember,all of my shooting was done offhand. Concentrate on hitting small targets at a distance--my favorite target used to be a Santa Claus head I had pulled off a pez dispenser-heheh I did lots of shooting with that little gun--and it certainly developed my hand to eye coordination and shooting skills. As I guess someone already mentioned--in addition to the proper sight picture, the most important things to remember are: Hold steady...squeeze the trigger...and follow through. After you've done lots of shooting,I believe these things become sort of "ingrained" in your mind--like riding a bike. Now,before hunting season I like to set up some tin cans (50 yards with open sights) and pick them off with a .22 or .22 Magnum rifle...rimfires are the best for practice as they really have no recoil--and thus are better for developing your shooting skills. Of course,make sure your center fire is properly sighted in also--but do most of your practice with the rimfires.I also like to shoot a bit,offhand with the center fires at longer ranges. Once you've done lots of offhand shooting and gotten good at it--you may want to limit the number of rounds you fire during your practice sessions-- to help you concentrate on making each shot count. Once you've mastered offhand shooting,shooting from a rest will seem like a piece of cake. Happy shooting

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