Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: Winter Caribou

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    North Pole
    Posts
    172

    Default Winter Caribou

    Okay, real quick question. I have done no research on this yet, just a wild idea before I leave for Michigan. Is it legal to use a snowmachine to travel on a frozen river on the North Slope to get outside the corridor? Is it worth it? Has anyone ever done this? Any thoughts? Thanks all!

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    NorthWest Alaska
    Posts
    3,639

    Default

    Outside of my shopping grounds, but it sure sounds like a good ride!

    Good luck.

  3. #3
    Member n0g0d's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Girdwood
    Posts
    95

    Default

    No, it's not legal.

  4. #4
    Member Vince's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Fairbanks most the time, Ancorage some of the time,& on the road Kicking Anti's all the time
    Posts
    8,989

    Default

    that five mile corridor is CLOSED to motor transport of hunters or gear... froze or thawed.
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Vince View Post
    that five mile corridor is CLOSED to motor transport of hunters or gear... froze or thawed.
    Well....Sorta, kinda. But if you come into the corridor from the backside, it is good to go. Several hunters use this method. But you cannot leave from the Dalton Hwy on a snowmobile for the purpose of hunting, with a few exceptions, and those folks that are priveleged to do so, already know.
    "96% of all Internet Quotes are suspect and the remaining 4% are fiction."
    ~~Abraham Lincoln~~

  6. #6
    Member Vince's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Fairbanks most the time, Ancorage some of the time,& on the road Kicking Anti's all the time
    Posts
    8,989

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Akres View Post
    Well....Sorta, kinda. But if you come into the corridor from the backside, it is good to go. Several hunters use this method. But you cannot leave from the Dalton Hwy on a snowmobile for the purpose of hunting, with a few exceptions, and those folks that are privileged to do so, already know.
    Oh res i know all that but it is too confusing for guys who can't do that... you can cross the corridor, if you are on one side going to the other... but not start from the hwy or hunt with in it on the snogo....
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

  7. #7
    Member Hoyt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    1,154

    Default

    Don't guys run boats up there? That is motorized.

  8. #8

    Default

    "no motorized LAND vehicles" I think is how it is stated. I would eventually like to see that regulation changed for winter use. They could co-align the winter time frame to that of the ice road travel allowed for the oil and gas development. Those companies have to have approval for their ice roads and snow travel by the regulatory agencies, so the work is already done for Fish and Game.

  9. #9

    Wink

    Quote Originally Posted by Jerod View Post
    "no motorized LAND vehicles" I think is how it is stated. I would eventually like to see that regulation changed for winter use. They could co-align the winter time frame to that of the ice road travel allowed for the oil and gas development. Those companies have to have approval for their ice roads and snow travel by the regulatory agencies, so the work is already done for Fish and Game.
    The original arguement for the regulation, was not preservation of land or habitat. The locals did not want the competition at all, for hunting, but settled for the lesser regulatory clause that we now have. It is Meant to discourage hunting from the Dalton Hwy, not make it easier or more convienent. When the hwy was first you couldn't even travel on it. Then we found out you could if you were commercial, and so lots of guys became "transporters". Then they opened it up by permit only and by and by, the tourist industry saw there was opportunity to make big $ up there. Then the hwy was open to the public. It is way easier today than ever before, but it will never be as easy as hunting as say the Steece or Taylor areas, due to the protection the locals want. Some of the newbie's think it is about land protection, but if you get out the archives and read up on some the comments and solutions put forth in the public hearings process, it will all come to light.
    "96% of all Internet Quotes are suspect and the remaining 4% are fiction."
    ~~Abraham Lincoln~~

  10. #10
    Mark
    Guest

    Default

    It reads like this:

    ......Dalton Highway Corridor Management Area (DHCMA) - Units 20, 24, 25, and 26 extending five miles from each side of the Dalton Highway, including the drivable surface of the Dalton Highway, from the Yukon River to the Arctic Ocean, and including the Prudhoe Bay Closed Area..........Aircraft and boats may be used to transport hunters, their gear, or parts of game within the Dalton Highway Corridor Management Area. A snowmachine may be used to transport hunters, their gear, or parts of game across the management area from land outside the management area to access land on the other side of the management area. No motorized land vehicle may be used to transport hunters, their hunting gear, or parts of game, within the Dalton Highway Corridor Management Area, EXCEPT licensed highway vehicles may be used on the following designated roads: 1) Dalton Highway: 2) Bettles Winter Trail during periods when BLM and the City of Bettles announce that the trail is open to winter travel: 3) Galbraith Lake road from the Dalton Highway to the BLM campground at Galbraith Lake, including the gravel pit access road when the gate is open; 4) Toolik Lake Road, excluding the driveway to the Toolik Lake Research Facility; 5) The Sagavanirktok River access road two miles north of Pump Station 2; 6) any constructed roadway or gravel pit within 1/4 mile of the Dalton Highway............
    Your best bet:

    Take the Bettles Winter Road to Bettles, then run the Koyukuk/North Fork/Johns/Alatna Rivers with your snowgo.

  11. #11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Akres View Post
    The original arguement for the regulation, was not preservation of land or habitat. The locals did not want the competition at all, for hunting, but settled for the lesser regulatory clause that we now have. It is Meant to discourage hunting from the Dalton Hwy, not make it easier or more convienent. When the hwy was first you couldn't even travel on it. Then we found out you could if you were commercial, and so lots of guys became "transporters". Then they opened it up by permit only and by and by, the tourist industry saw there was opportunity to make big $ up there. Then the hwy was open to the public. It is way easier today than ever before, but it will never be as easy as hunting as say the Steece or Taylor areas, due to the protection the locals want. Some of the newbie's think it is about land protection, but if you get out the archives and read up on some the comments and solutions put forth in the public hearings process, it will all come to light.
    I'm aware of some of the history, and realize it is a "keep out of my backyard" type rule. I know the ABA faught to get bowhunting opened up and over the years people have tried to open up firearm hunting for small game along the corridor, but that has failed.

    I was against Ralph Seekins attempts to open the entire area up to off road use year round as the terrain north of the range is not adequate for off road vehicle use in the summer. I wasn't surprised when his efforts failed. I had e-mailed him (no response) and asked if he would be interested in trying to push for winter snow travel use and make it a separate issue from summer use. The reason was that since BLM is tasked to manage the state land north of Slope Mountain, and they started enforcing the no snowmachine use rule, everybody that I know of who had snowmachine accessed trap lines had to stop using them. It goes beyond hunting, as it is closed to all use except oil/gas exploration/development. I think the Toolik researchers get a free pass as well.

    It would be nice to see the added opportunity. Typically the winter travel is from mid December to mid April, so it would be a short time frame. There is a lot of gound out there open to hunting that the locals don't use. I spent Friday and Saturday flying all over up here, and will back out again tomorrow. It is unreal how much country there is. I was surprised to see as many moose as well, even on 50"ish bull with his headgear in tact.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •