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Thread: Re-sizing bullets

  1. #1

    Default Re-sizing bullets

    I have a question for Murphy or some of the other shooting/reloading experts on the forum.....

    I have asked Barnes Bullets if they intend to offer a .35 caliper bullet heavier than the 225 grain presently offered as their catelog number 35824. The response was "No".

    Not being one inclined to accept "No" to stuff in life, I'm drawn to my next question:

    Is it possible for me to swag or resize a 9.3 mm (.366 inch) 286 grain (Barnes catelog number 36628) copper bullet down to the .358 size without destroying the internal integrity of the bullet?

    I know lead bullets can be re-sized using a reloading press and a sizing die. I'm wondering about a copper bullet though?

    I assume the Sectional density & Ballistic coefficient would be altered to new values. I'm more interested in the structural integrity of the bullet remaining true for terminal performance.

    If possible, please suggest tips and/or equipment recommended on the re-sizing/swagging process.



  2. #2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ex1811 View Post
    I have a question for Murphy or some of the other shooting/reloading experts on the forum.....

    I have asked Barnes Bullets if they intend to offer a .35 caliper bullet heavier than the 225 grain presently offered as their catelog number 35824. The response was "No".

    Not being one inclined to accept "No" to stuff in life, I'm drawn to my next question:

    Is it possible for me to swag or resize a 9.3 mm (.366 inch) 286 grain (Barnes catelog number 36628) copper bullet down to the .358 size without destroying the internal integrity of the bullet?

    I know lead bullets can be re-sized using a reloading press and a sizing die. I'm wondering about a copper bullet though?

    I assume the Sectional density & Ballistic coefficient would be altered to new values. I'm more interested in the structural integrity of the bullet remaining true for terminal performance.

    If possible, please suggest tips and/or equipment recommended on the re-sizing/swagging process.


    I haven't tried it, but I'm betting that if you're swaging down much at all you won't be able to do it with a conventional press. Or maybe so if you did it with a succession of smaller and smaller swaging dies. It's more likely that you would have to use a bullet swaging press, which would also be your source for suitable swaging dies. I'm not at home with my favorites links and having a brainfart about the name of the leading company for those. Anyone else?

  3. #3
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    I have swaged lead core bulets down with Corbin, I believe that's the name BrownBear, dies and a Rockchucker press or the Redding Big boss. I don't think you can successfully swage a solid copper bullet. All you would do is reduce the rings (lands) down by .008". This would alter the bullet and possibly to the point to where the nose "petals" wouldn't work as intended. I cannot see where the effort would be worth the trouble and expense. Bullet swaging dies are not cheap.

    Yes the SD would change if you change the diameter without changing the weight. Sectional Density: The weight (in pounds,g/7000) divided by the square of the diameter. SD=W/d^2 Easy to calculate.

    Why does Barnes make a 286 grain .366 and only a 225 grain .358"?

    Why not just try a 280 grain Swift A-frame. It will come out the barrel the same way a Barnes does and any animal worth shooting with a 35 caliber, won't know what hit him.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



  4. #4

    Default Points well stated...

    Quote Originally Posted by Murphy View Post
    I have swaged lead core bulets down with Corbin, I believe that's the name BrownBear, dies and a Rockchucker press or the Redding Big boss. I don't think you can successfully swage a solid copper bullet. All you would do is reduce the rings (lands) down by .008". This would alter the bullet and possibly to the point to where the nose "petals" wouldn't work as intended. I cannot see where the effort would be worth the trouble and expense. Bullet swaging dies are not cheap.

    Agreed on the cost effectiveness issue but I was thinking of locating someone with the equipment and paying a fee to have a batch swagged down to .358.

    Yes the SD would change if you change the diameter without changing the weight. Sectional Density: The weight (in pounds,g/7000) divided by the square of the diameter. SD=W/d^2 Easy to calculate.

    Why does Barnes make a 286 grain .366 and only a 225 grain .358"?

    Exactly the question I posed to Barnes a few weeks ago. They have no plans for marketing a heavier than 225 grain bullet. Probably (I surmise) a marketing decision, since the .35 caliper is not embraced by the shooting industry.

    Why not just try a 280 grain Swift A-frame. It will come out the barrel the same way a Barnes does and any animal worth shooting with a 35 caliber, won't know what hit him.
    And the answer lies with the Peoples Republic of Kalifornistan. I will do some hog hunting there and the state does not allow lead based ammo. Ordinarily I would use my favorite Swift 280 Grain A-Frames but they are lead based. The reason cited is that predators and Raptors are experiancing increased levels of lead poisoning from feeding upon gut piles. Caution goes to the rest of the country as Kalifornistan often sets the trends for future laws in the rest of the country. Just one more kiss to hunters from the Land of Fruits and Nutz.....


    Know anyone with the equipment capable of swagging a batch of Barnes .366 down to .358 Barnes as a test run?

  5. #5

    Default

    Know anyone with the equipment capable of swagging a batch of Barnes .366 down to .358 Barnes as a test run?
    I'm kinda wondering if it's worth the effort. I used to use the old Speer 275's in a Whelen and an Improved Whelen. Haven't used them since my stock ran out close to 30 years ago, but when the 225 Noslers came along, they outperformed the Speers on all counts. If you like the Barnes and have to use them, I can't imagine you'd notice the difference. At least not on any California porkers I ever shot, trapped or spotted. Interesting experiment and worthwhile if it really toots your whistle, but the animal itself isn't going to know the difference I bet.

  6. #6
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    I knew I should not have read this thread... I went out to the shop and tried it. I jammed up the works. I was using my rockchucker press.


    Are you loading for 35 Whelen or 358 Norma type velocities?

    remember that some of the real heavy bullets won't stabilize in some rifling twist.

    For 35 Whelen Velocities I have used:

    The Hornady 250 grain round nose and spitzer
    http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpag...eitemid=189943

    And the Speer 250 Grain Spitzer
    http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpag...eitemid=659771
    Plus I have used some of the old Barnes 275 grain jobs that are no longer being made. The 275 grain Barnes did not group well.



    For 358 Norma Mag hot loads
    A-square makes a very expensive semi solid in 3 types.
    http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpag...eitemid=777087

    The old standby 250 grain Nosler Partition is hard to beat;
    http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpag...eitemid=707005

    Swift A-frame makes a neat 280 grain, that I have never tried
    http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpag...eitemid=466516

    And Woodleigh makes a 310 grain heavy jacketed soft point that is not all that bad price wise.
    http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpag...eitemid=599744

    My old 358 Norma would not shoot anything longer than the 250 grain Partition type bullets and still group worth a darn.



    I gotta go find a 35 caliber solid steel punch rod and my big hammer.

    xx
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
    http://site.dragonflyaero.com

  7. #7

    Default Hmmmm.....

    Sorry that lil devil on your shoulder made you jam up those dies.....you didn't have anything better to do on a nice crisp night like this anyway.

    In answer to your question, I'm loading for .358 Norma, in a rifle that is 1 in 12 inch twist. I've not had a problem stabilizing the heavy rounds before. I routinely only shoot heavy bullets, as I'm not a "go-fast" high velocity guy. I'm just trying to make use of copper bullets, rather than the tried and true lead w/ jackets of various configurations.

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