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Thread: C vs O presses

  1. #1
    Member big_dog60's Avatar
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    Default C vs O presses

    I have been looking into reloading presses and was wondering about the 2 types. I have only used the C type, but was wondering what advantages the O type has? They seem more expensive but I don't know why.
    I am aware of the phisics regarding the 2 shapes, but is that the only difference or are there application differences as well?

  2. #2
    Member Rich_in_AK's Avatar
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    Default presses

    If you are going to be sizing large caliber rifle cases I would recommend getting the O type press as they are designed to handle the much greater forces required to size the large magnum cases. For just doing pistol reloading you might find the C type more convenient and it will do just as well.

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    Member big_dog60's Avatar
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    Thank you!

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    The "O" frame presses also have a compound leverage system which allows you to apply much more force. They are stronger but I don't think there is a lot of difference if you just load for a few rifles and handguns for yourself. Teh RCBS Rockchucker and the Redding Big Boss are the two most popular "O" presses. I also have a Redding T-7 Turret press, with seven die holes in a rotating turret. This also technically is a "C" frame press but is made very strong and virtually spring proof and it is a great working press. I have loaded every shoulder fired caliber on it including the big Fifty. It is not a weak press.

    Regardless of what you buy I would strongly suggest you invest in a more durable, albeit more expensive, press. It is a once in a lifetime investment.
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    Member pinehavensredrocket's Avatar
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    i have used many of the reloading presses mentioned....rcbs,lee challenger,c&h, dillon,hornady, to mention a few. recently i "switched" to a lee classic cast press. this model has the features of some of the best presses + a better priming system. further, the loading window is huge! and really accessible. of course it has the compound leverage system (with an adjustable lever). and a solid cast IRON frame. check it out.

    happy trails.
    jh

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    I agree with Murphy. I own a Redding T-7 and love it. It is built like a tank and won't flex. I looked at Lee because of the price, but liked the durabilty and flexibility of the Redding. Bought it at SW in Wasilla for $219. It was more than Lee, but that is the difference between aluminum (Lee) and cast iron Redding). Google the two, Lee vs. Redding, and read the differences. It helped my decision to pony up the extra money. Good luck!

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    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
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    I have a Rockcrusher and like it fine, got in the mid 80's sometime. I also have a Lee C press that I have had even longer but it has been replaced by Lee 5 or 6 times over the years as it's pron to snap in half during full length resizing. I don't resize with the Lee anymore, mostly just seat with it.

    Andy

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    Member .338-06's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ADfields View Post
    I have a Rockcrusher and like it fine, got in the mid 80's sometime. I also have a Lee C press that I have had even longer but it has been replaced by Lee 5 or 6 times over the years as it's pron to snap in half during full length resizing. I don't resize with the Lee anymore, mostly just seat with it.

    Andy
    You've snapped 5 or 6 Lee C presses in half during resizing!? What the heck are you using for sizing lube?

    It's just that I have a Lee c press that I've been using for ten years (got it from the big Pay'nSave sell-off) and I've never come near to damaging the press. I've torn rims off when I've skimped or forgotten to lube cases. Or used that **** One Shot spray lube. I'm not sure I'm strong enough to snap a press in half!

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    Member pinehavensredrocket's Avatar
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    not to replow the field but.......check the lee "classic cast" cast IRON o press. this is the strongest o press with new features available. this great item only costs 2/3 the price of the competition, and is BETTER! i have loaded all my centerfire rifle cases on it and like it more than when new.

    it is worth a look!

    jh

  10. #10
    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by .338-06 View Post
    You've snapped 5 or 6 Lee C presses in half during resizing!? What the heck are you using for sizing lube?

    It's just that I have a Lee c press that I've been using for ten years (got it from the big Pay'nSave sell-off) and I've never come near to damaging the press. I've torn rims off when I've skimped or forgotten to lube cases. Or used that **** One Shot spray lube. I'm not sure I'm strong enough to snap a press in half!
    Lee makes some good presses but the cheep one I have will brake in resizing! It's the "Lee Reloader" the least expensive press around at about $20. It's supposed to be able to resize a 30-06 according to the instructions, but I had the frame snap in half with 357 brass. In fact 357 and 30-30 is all I loaded with the first one so when it snapped on the 3rd 30-30 brass I only used the replacements on 357s. With the ones that only had 357 in them the best I got was about 45 rounds before snapping in half. I say snapped in half but it was more like the part that the die threads snaps off the "C" part. I did use One Shot, but also Unique, Fosters, Frankford Arsenal, Hornady wax, even 3-in-1 oil, and Lee lube free 357 dies. Don't mater a bit to the little press, it just can't take it! The Hornady One Shot was best by far and I still use it on everything including 300WM in my RCBS press with great results.

    Andy

  11. #11

    Default Presses

    Quote Originally Posted by ADfields View Post
    Lee makes some good presses but the cheep one I have will brake in resizing! It's the "Lee Reloader" the least expensive press around at about $20. It's supposed to be able to resize a 30-06 according to the instructions, but I had the frame snap in half with 357 brass. In fact 357 and 30-30 is all I loaded with the first one so when it snapped on the 3rd 30-30 brass I only used the replacements on 357s. With the ones that only had 357 in them the best I got was about 45 rounds before snapping in half. I say snapped in half but it was more like the part that the die threads snaps off the "C" part. I did use One Shot, but also Unique, Fosters, Frankford Arsenal, Hornady wax, even 3-in-1 oil, and Lee lube free 357 dies. Don't mater a bit to the little press, it just can't take it! The Hornady One Shot was best by far and I still use it on everything including 300WM in my RCBS press with great results.

    Andy
    I've used all of RCBS's presses from the Partner (a small aluminum press) to the Rockchucker (a compound press). I've use them for everything from 25acp to 458 WM. I've also modified 3 Rockchuckers to manufacture my own jacketed 6mm bullets. They will produce enough pressure to squirt lead out of a hole the size of a pencil lead like it is tooth paste (when sizeing bullet cores). Add to this list a couple of Redding C presses(cast iron) a Lyman O press and Herters (cast iron), LEE O press; Some progressives as well.
    The most fun single stage for small callibers (rifle and pistol) is the RCBS Partner (several bench rest shooters I know use them as well), the most useful across the board was the RCBS JR, the one used most for wildcatting and big stuff is the Rockchucker. The use determines which press I put on the bench.
    On a different note, the Redding C press offers less obstruction when loading than any O press. NOTE; I no longer own a progressive press, I just like the quality control with single stage presses.
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  12. #12
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    The Lee Classic Cast is a heck of a value. I have one myself and it is a heavy duty unit. Lee made it to be able to handle 50 bmg also. I go mine new off ebay, shipped to my house in Fairbanks for 75 bucks a couple years ago.

    Quote Originally Posted by pinehavensredrocket View Post
    not to replow the field but.......check the lee "classic cast" cast IRON o press. this is the strongest o press with new features available. this great item only costs 2/3 the price of the competition, and is BETTER! i have loaded all my centerfire rifle cases on it and like it more than when new.

    it is worth a look!

    jh

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