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Thread: 7.7mm x 56r

  1. #1
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    Default 7.7mm x 56r

    Here is a classic old round, the 303 British. Whenever I hear that, I almost immediately think of the Lee-Enfield yet I realize I now know very little about the cartridge. After googling the name I see it comes up and was a real "classic" and I begin to think about my oldest brothers military surplus rifle he purchased for about 60.00 us dollars at a gun shop. I took it on a hunt once, but never had to shoot at anything, but it was at that time alot of fun to take out and shoot.
    According to the information the measurements are taken from "land to land" as opposed "grove to grove" and I really don't know what it means except it may elude to a metric system some of us refuse to accept.
    But as I read some of the information on line I took note of the many different configurations that this was chambered too; the P14, a really cool looking battlefield rifle used by the British during WW1, and the MK1 and MK111's, but the list goes on and on, and to my surprise even a machine gun used during the war. What are some of your thoughts on this Old Classic / 303 British?

  2. #2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rufus View Post
    Here is a classic old round, the 303 British. Whenever I hear that, I almost immediately think of the Lee-Enfield yet I realize I now know very little about the cartridge. After googling the name I see it comes up and was a real "classic" and I begin to think about my oldest brothers military surplus rifle he purchased for about 60.00 us dollars at a gun shop. I took it on a hunt once, but never had to shoot at anything, but it was at that time alot of fun to take out and shoot.
    According to the information the measurements are taken from "land to land" as opposed "grove to grove" and I really don't know what it means except it may elude to a metric system some of us refuse to accept.
    But as I read some of the information on line I took note of the many different configurations that this was chambered too; the P14, a really cool looking battlefield rifle used by the British during WW1, and the MK1 and MK111's, but the list goes on and on, and to my surprise even a machine gun used during the war. What are some of your thoughts on this Old Classic / 303 British?
    At one time there was a whole lot of wildcatting with it in Australia. I don't remember the details, but back in the 70's a friend got interested and built some of them up. Good performers, comparable to anything we develop on our more familiar 06 and 308 cases. Good deer and elk round, and I wouldn't hesitate to use it for moose. Still have to watch out for berdan primed cases, but with conventional cases there's no reason not to use it.

  3. #3
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    Default 7.7mm x 56r

    What are some notable differences in the Lee-Enfield platform and the 1917 platform; I read that there was a difference in magazine capacity but I think there is probably more to it. (I just noticed that the 1917 is a Mauser 98 action derivative platform) Is there one other reason for the difference, perhaps what the rest of the world was building at this period is all if any reason to do this? I am thinking cost to build and time in the mass production to build. I think it would be neat to have a P14.

  4. #4

    Default 303

    The 303 was also chambered in the Winchester 95 for export to Africa, as well as the 7.62x54R which was exported to Russia. There was a massive order of Enfields made by Savage at the begining of WWll. The Enfield in one form or other was made by Remington, Winchester, Eddystone, Savage as well as a bunch of British, Austrailian,and Indian manufacturers. Many were made in Pakistan and sold to Afghanistan during the Russian/Afghan war.
    They are the Austrailian equivalant of the US 30-06 and have been wildcatted into most calibers from 17 to 375.

    The P14 has a built in 5 round non-detachable magazine (uses strippers), the MKl has a 10 round detachable magazine.
    P14s have become expensive as of late while the MKl are still available at reasonable prices.
    " Americans will never need the 2nd Amendment, until the government tries to take it away."

    On the road of life..... Pot holes keep things interesting !

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