Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 22

Thread: 454 casull or 460 S&W

  1. #1

    Default 454 casull or 460 S&W

    I'm in the market for bear protection. Planning a lot of hiking/kayaking next summer. I have shot the 454 with good accuracy for a first timer (borrowed a friend's). I'm curious what people who own either gun thinks about its accuracy, kick, and quality of specific brands. We could even throw the .500 into the discussion because i've been drooling over it too. I'm sure this has been the topic of discussion before but i'm interested in experienced opinions. I've been hanging out at gun shops (and pawnshops checking out used ones) getting a lot of different opinions.

  2. #2
    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Missing Palmer AK in Phonix AZ.
    Posts
    6,416

    Default

    I have the 460V S&W and love it, it will shoot the 454 and 45lc also. Thats why I went with it, I plink with it and will hunt with it next year. It's accuracy is outstanding even with my 4 inch model. Recoil is like that of a 454 without a compensator when shooting the 460 Mag rounds in it. When I shoot a 454 in it its like a 44 special, and the 45lc is like a 357 mag as for recoil. That compensator is great and I would not think of cracking off a 460 round without it in place or getting the survival model 460 that has no muzzle compensator at all. If your curious and around Palmer I would be happy to let you pop a round or two in mine.

    Andy

  3. #3
    Member JoeJ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    ND
    Posts
    207

    Default

    If you want to go big you can't go wrong with the S&W500. You can go the 2-1/2", 4" which is really a 3" with a 1" compensator or the 6-1/2" barrel. If you handload you can load up or down depending upon your recoil comfort level and you will punch a big hole into anything. The accuracy is excellent with most rounds. You will be able to fire rapidly with accuracy after a little practice at ranges from 10 feet to 25 yards. You can purchase “factory” ammo if you don’t reload from 350 grains to 700 grains. If you reload you can purchase both hardcast and jacketed bullets from 330 grain to 500 grain. I don’t know of any jacketed bullets beyond 500 grains but you can purchase heavier hardcast bullets in weights of 535, 600 and 700 grain for reloading. The downside to the S&W500 is the weight and muzzle blast. The weight issue can be overcome somewhat by wearing a stout belt and proper holster. The muzzle blast calls for good ear protection. You just don't walk outside and "touch" one off for the hell of it without paying a price. If you shoot the S&W500 without ear protection you could and most likely will suffer permanent hearing damage. A good sign of damage done is the "ringing" in your ears - the ringing goes away but the damage done is permanent. It probably won't be noticeable to you at the time but over the years your hearing may decline more so than with just "normal ageing" hearing loss issues. So, when “strolling” through the timbers where you could meet up with a critter meaning to chew on you a little, I would suggest wearing some sort of hearing protection (there’s a lot of makes and models out there both commercial and custom) while walking in those areas. On a side note, one can only wonder at what the shock wave/sound must be like when you're on the receiving end of a S&W500 when the bullet miss you at 20 feet - probably similar to a concussion grenade.


  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    21

    Default

    I too went for the 460V for its versatility, accuracy, and very sweet trigger.

  5. #5
    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Missing Palmer AK in Phonix AZ.
    Posts
    6,416

    Default

    The 460 is sort of a even match with the 500 for power and comes in the same gun. I like all the different things a 460 can do, and for hunting I think its a better choice than the 500 due to the wide range of loadings and bullets it can use. Also the 460 has far better range due to the extreme muzzle velocitys you can get, 300 yards is well within the guns abilities if its within the shooters.

    Andy

  6. #6

    Default

    For hiking, I'd think a Smith x-frame (.460 or .500) would get heavy after a while, but it wouldn't be so bad for kayaking.

    If you do seriously consider .454, you might look up Ruger's Super Redhawk; it's a big gun, but it's lighter than an x-frame, and 335 grains of .454 can still pack about 1,800 ft-lb's of wollup. The gun can also digest any .45 long colt or .45 lc+p you load it with.

    A good hiking gun in .454 might be Ruger's Alaskan. I've handled one but haven't shot it. It supposedly has a harsh kick, but it's relatively packable for such a large caliber.

    Personally, I worry more about wild dogs and 2-legged evildoers while out hiking, and I prefer a .44 magnum with a couple speedloaders. But then, I only visit my home state of AK once a year and tend to hike in areas with not too many bears.

    Edit: Quality. I forgot you asked about that. Go with either Smith & Wesson or Ruger, as both are very reliable. My experience is that Smiths generally have smoother trigger actions out of the box, while Rugers are rugged workhorses that are great for shooting at the range.
    Tsimshian tribe, wolf clan, the house of Walsk.

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    505

    Default Barrel Length on the Alaskan?

    Quote Originally Posted by Wolfeye View Post
    For hiking, I'd think a Smith x-frame (.460 or .500) would get heavy after a while, but it wouldn't be so bad for kayaking.

    If you do seriously consider .454, you might look up Ruger's Super Redhawk; it's a big gun, but it's lighter than an x-frame, and 335 grains of .454 can still pack about 1,800 ft-lb's of wollup. The gun can also digest any .45 long colt or .45 lc+p you load it with.

    A good hiking gun in .454 might be Ruger's Alaskan. I've handled one but haven't shot it. It supposedly has a harsh kick, but it's relatively packable for such a large caliber.

    Personally, I worry more about wild dogs and 2-legged evildoers while out hiking, and I prefer a .44 magnum with a couple speedloaders. But then, I only visit my home state of AK once a year and tend to hike in areas with not too many bears.

    Edit: Quality. I forgot you asked about that. Go with either Smith & Wesson or Ruger, as both are very reliable. My experience is that Smiths generally have smoother trigger actions out of the box, while Rugers are rugged workhorses that are great for shooting at the range.
    Wolfeye has it exactly right. (In my opinion)

    The Alaskan is easier to carry than the longer barrel SRH I chose. The Alaskan is a valid choice and if you load the right powder for it, you can compensate (partly) for the shortness of the barrel.

    The 7.5" has triple the barrel length of the Alaskan and I chose to trade some convenience and speed of draw for a little bit more velocity. I carry in a cross-draw holster in the "appendix position" usually. Puts the gun under my right hand but out of the way of my arm swing and doesn't interfere with my backpack belt. It works for me.

    To each his own. (If I had the chance to own an Alaskan, I might just do it)

    Lost Sheep.

    P.S. If I had my druthers, I would remove the Ruger barrel entirely and replace it with something modeled after the Dan Wesson. In that way, I could have the long and the short whenever I wanted.

  8. #8

    Default When I bought my 454

    the 460 was due out in about 6 months....now that it has been released, I would go with the 460 as will also throw 454's downrange. Not much of a decision there, IMHO. I really like the ballistic's of the 454 Casull cartridge. The fact that the 460 will throw both cartridges seems to seal the deal for me.....one day I might purchase the 460...but for now, my 454 works just fine. Though I am tending to carry my Marlin Guide Gun and a can of bear spray instead of the 454.....

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Chugiak
    Posts
    47

    Default

    I opted for the 460V, instead of the 454 or 50. More versatillity! Kenetic energy and balistics are great. I don't like real short barrels but a 6 7/8" was to long to pack for bear protection (IMO). So, the 5" barrel with a DJ leather chest holster works great, even when wearing a pack.

    But firearms are like vehicles................everyone has thier own preferences. Shoot what your comfortable and confident with.

  10. #10
    Member WinMag_300's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    132

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JoeJ View Post
    ...The muzzle blast calls for good ear protection. You just don't walk outside and "touch" one off for the hell of it without paying a price. If you shoot the S&W500 without ear protection you could and most likely will suffer permanent hearing damage. ...
    I found that I had ringing in my ears after one range session of 20 rounds with a borrowed revolver. I was wearing industrial foam ear plugs along with high quality muffs. Still, I felt shock waves reverberating through my head. I don't think firing those hand cannons is a healthy pastime. I felt shaken up, as if I had something going wrong in my head. It took maybe two days for me to feel normal again. Part of the problem could have been that I was shooting at an indoor range and the walls provided a sort of echo chamber to reflect the sound waves. In hindsight, it would be better to always shoot the hand cannons in the great outdoors.
    Quote Originally Posted by Wolfeye View Post
    For hiking, I'd think a Smith x-frame (.460 or .500) would get heavy after a while, but it wouldn't be so bad for kayaking.

    If you do seriously consider .454, you might look up Ruger's Super Redhawk; it's a big gun, but it's lighter than an x-frame...
    Personally, I worry more about wild dogs and 2-legged evildoers while out hiking, and I prefer a .44 magnum with a couple speedloaders. ....
    I feel the same way. I carry .44 Mag. and if I feel the need for more power, I pack a .30-06.
    Quote Originally Posted by Lost Sheep View Post
    ...
    P.S. If I had my druthers, I would remove the Ruger barrel entirely and replace it with something modeled after the Dan Wesson. In that way, I could have the long and the short whenever I wanted.
    I agree that would be an awesome setup. Interchangeable barrels would be a great way to go for many outdoorsmen. I thought about buying the Dan Wesson Alaskan in .445 Supermag but it no longer appears on the CZ/Dan Wesson web site. Maybe it is discontinued.
    A man is rich in proportion to the number of things he can afford to let alone. - Henry David Thoreau

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Bakerton, WV
    Posts
    467

    Default

    You miss one of the greatest guns made for about anything on earth. The BFR .475. Much lighter, super accurate, easy to load for and less noise.
    I have shot many deer without ear protection and not a single shot has bothered my ears WHILE HUNTING! I would not shoot any gun at the range without ear protection but I also will not hunt with any gun with a compensator.
    Will you carry a gun that will destroy your hearing while doing other things like fishing or will you wear muffs all day in case you need to shoot something?
    I would also carry the longest barrel you are comfortable with. The few extra ounces saved with a short barrel is silly.
    I spent a long time lugging an M1 or a Browning air cooled on my shoulder. I hunted for years with an 11# Hawken, up and down hills. My Browning 45-70 BPCR is unreal but I still carry it even though I am 71.
    I can only wonder about guys wanting a 2" barrel on a revolver!
    To me, a 4-1/2# revolver (with ultra dot and sling.) is WONDERFUL. A plain Jane BFR with a 7-1/2" barrel is only 3-1/2#.
    Are all of you 100# wimps? The junk food you ate last weighs more then your gun!
    To choose a huge X frame noise box for a carry gun is silly too, the gun is made for a primary hunting gun but everyone wants to shorten it for carry. There are better guns for that.

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    North Pole Alaska
    Posts
    166

    Default My opinion

    I have a 460 with a five inch barrel. I lug it around on my belt its a little heavy but thats okay. The thing that swayed me from buying the 500 was the ammo.
    quick look at prices internet and local shops around fairbanks
    45L less than a buck a round
    454 about a 1.25 a round
    460 about a 1.00 a round
    500 about 2.00 a round
    greatest gun for anything made on earth (BFR .475) don't know, no one has any
    Now do understand that prices and quanities may vary these are just quick estimates

  13. #13

    Default

    I only shoot 460 loads out of my S&W 460v, but I've read that it is the premier 454 gun on the market.

    I don't know about all that, but they attribute this to the X-Frame's ability to absorb recoil. That, along with the hogue grips effectively make a 454 feel like somewhat of a *****cat.

  14. #14
    Member JeepStew's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    allover alaska
    Posts
    28

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeL View Post
    I have a 460 with a five inch barrel. I lug it around on my belt its a little heavy but thats okay. The thing that swayed me from buying the 500 was the ammo.
    quick look at prices internet and local shops around fairbanks
    45L less than a buck a round
    454 about a 1.25 a round
    460 about a 1.00 a round
    500 about 2.00 a round
    greatest gun for anything made on earth (BFR .475) don't know, no one has any
    Now do understand that prices and quanities may vary these are just quick estimates
    i agree with the above averages on cost but do you really want to place cost over your life if you may need the extra power? shot placement is whats on my mind.

  15. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    North Pole Alaska
    Posts
    166

    Default Extra power

    I also believe shot placement is the most important part but, If you cant afford to practice with the weapon then extra power is a waste.

  16. #16
    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Missing Palmer AK in Phonix AZ.
    Posts
    6,416

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeL View Post
    I also believe shot placement is the most important part but, If you cant afford to practice with the weapon then extra power is a waste.
    You can load a 460 for about $.03 more per round than 454, and about $.07 a round than a 45lc/44mag. And it's a fun gun related hobby when it's -16 out, like it is here tonight!

    Andy

  17. #17
    Member JeepStew's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    allover alaska
    Posts
    28

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeL View Post
    I also believe shot placement is the most important part but, If you cant afford to practice with the weapon then extra power is a waste.

    thats why you just practice with a laser grip and dont dry fire. if i worried about the cost of a bullet each time i fired i wouldnt shoot at all. its like camaro's vs. nova's.....

    i am not picking on you but really if we can afford the guns we can afford the bullets no matter the make and model

  18. #18
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    North Pole Alaska
    Posts
    166

    Default Cost

    Don't worry about my feelings jeepstew, we all can't be as rich as you and not care about how much ammo cost. I think reloading will be my next hobby. also where did you find a laser grip for a x frame i would look into purchasing one.

  19. #19
    Member ADUKHNT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    503

    Default

    Another vote for the 460 5" carried in a Dave Johnston Guides Gear holster. For the versatility, comfort and the price I don't believe it can be beat.

  20. #20
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    2,448

    Default

    A .460 has a hell of a lot of recoil. If you practice with lower recoil rounds you will not be acustomed to the recoil and in my opinion that is why you need to practice with it full bore so you can do follow up shots quickly. I went with a .454. With 360grn bullets, its a nasty weapon but can you ever have enough with a brown??

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •