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Thread: German Wirehaired Pointers

  1. #1
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    Default German Wirehaired Pointers

    I looking at making a deposit for a pup of an upcoming litter of German Wirehaired Pointers very soon. This will be my first gun dog so it has taken some time to decide on the breed. I feel I have done my research on breeder and gun dog and I believe I will be happy with my choice; however, I wanted to know if any of the members here who own a GWP could describe their GWP in terms of ease of training, temperament, intelligence and hunting capabilities (i.e., retrieving, pointing, tracking, etc). I assume there may be more GSP owners than GWP owner's, so if you own a GSP please feel free to comment.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Member MikeGSP's Avatar
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    Default I'm no pro

    Well I own a GSP and she is now 18 months old now. I've read the books and watched DVD's on what to do or make them do. I took what I wanted out ot them and used them to my likeing. I had her out on my dads farm at 8 weeks grouse hunting as soon as I got her home. When she was only 4 weeks she gave me her first point when I was checking out the litter, I know some say you can't tell anything from a dog at that young, but out of all the pups she was the only one that pointed the wing and showed curiousity interest in the yard as the owner put it, she would be off on her own exploring with her nose down as the others played and wined, so I took that as a strong drive attitude. I read a book called Training the Versatile Hunting Dog by Chuck Johnson ( recomend reading ) who trains both GWP,GSP but mostly the GWP's and his approach and views on things seemed to my liking as far as the dog training him/herself as you helping along with exposing them to different situtations and thus helping in other training down the road. She is very smart and was picking up the pointing at 13-16 weeks as I bought some quail and a few pheasants for her and my girlfriend was out planting them as fast as me and her dad were shooting them, and little Quinn was pointing them for a mere 4-5 seconds before she couldn't take it no more and had to check it out, which at that point I didn't care cuz it was the experience of everything I was wanting her to get. Soon that same day she was figureing out her nose and was sniffing out the ones that flew into the brush and the ones that fell to the shot in brush and man was she a proud pup as all of us were pumping her up to keep it all positive. I'm kinda on a mixed view of the force fetch so the drills I've been working her on have totally been in a positive sense as she brings the bird back she would drop it alot at first but would grab it again and carry it a little further and drop it ect...she now is bringing them back most of the way if not all the way with maybe 1-2 drops here and there, and the longest was I think a 70 yd retrieve through me coaxing her with positive reinforcement and walking backwards and making her go back and getting it if she did drop it and come running back to me. It took a few outings on the heel and whoa training but she is now holding point til I get there to flush the bird and were still working on steady to shot, but I'm not training to be trial dog just a dog that hunts to my expecations. I would do the check cord on her as I worked her in the field then let her go and see how she was coming and if not I'd grab it and walk her through it and so on and she is coming around. Some might disagree with my tactics but it's what suits me and she has fun, in fact when I grab the shock collar she gets all excitied and comes up to me and sits down waiting for me to put it on her, cuz she knows something fun is about to happen. So now I've gone further and raise chukars and pigeons for her and sell them to help with some of the costs of feeding them not to make money. At 4 1/2 months of age I had one of the biggest compliments from another hunter how she was further along than one of her friends 2 year old, as she dove into the brush to retrieve that pheastant that the 2 year old wouldn't go into the brush. I make her watch othe dogs and that drives her crazy and she wants to go and be out there which only makes her I think that much better of a hunter, she finds birds quick and sometimes to quick as a few bumps here and there but she is figuring out how to be more cautious, cuz now when she is on a strong scent she slows up and lowers her chest to the ground and light foots in on the bird then locks up, and I don't get tired of watching that at all. As far as her temper goes she is all bubbly and happy all of the time, no aggression at all or towards other dogs, even when were training them together, couldn't be happier with the overall results.

    mike

  3. #3

    Default GWP

    Live2Hunt,

    I just picked up my Deutch Drahthaar pup at the airport on Sunday. I got him from a breeder in Texas, and so far I've been amazed at his instinct for hunting and retrieving. He's 9 weeks old, and right when I got him home, he decided to explore around the living room. His nose went down, his tail went up, and if we'd been outside I'd have sworn that he had a noseful of bird. Then I gave him a pig's ear to chew on, and when I started tossing it for him, he'd run and get it and immediately bring it back to me... no wandering, dropping, or stopping to chew. Now he has a small canvas bumper that he loves to play fetch with. I haven't put the bird scent on it yet, but yesterday a friend gave me some frozen wings and a frozen quail. I'm sure he'll go nuts over them.

    The only problems I've had with him have been very minor. We're working on house training, but I just have to watch him carefully when he's inside. When he's not active (i.e. calm in his kennel or sleeping) he can hold it for a pretty long time, but when he's active and running around, he needs to go outside every 20-30 minutes. I take him to the same spot in the front yard and praise him and give him a treat when he goes, and he's getting the hang of it. Also, he's still getting used to his kennel and doesn't like being locked up, so he gets pretty noisy. If I want him to settle down, putting a blanket over his kennel really helps.

    I know this isn't much info, but hopefully it helps in your first week with your pup. If you'll give me your email address, I'll send you a great article my breeder sent me on early puppy pointing and developing the GWP's natural instinct to point. Good luck with your pup!

    Barron

  4. #4
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    Default GWP

    Quote Originally Posted by Zort-Em View Post
    Live2Hunt,

    I just picked up my Deutch Drahthaar pup at the airport on Sunday. I got him from a breeder in Texas, and so far I've been amazed at his instinct for hunting and retrieving. He's 9 weeks old, and right when I got him home, he decided to explore around the living room. His nose went down, his tail went up, and if we'd been outside I'd have sworn that he had a noseful of bird. Then I gave him a pig's ear to chew on, and when I started tossing it for him, he'd run and get it and immediately bring it back to me... no wandering, dropping, or stopping to chew. Now he has a small canvas bumper that he loves to play fetch with. I haven't put the bird scent on it yet, but yesterday a friend gave me some frozen wings and a frozen quail. I'm sure he'll go nuts over them.

    The only problems I've had with him have been very minor. We're working on house training, but I just have to watch him carefully when he's inside. When he's not active (i.e. calm in his kennel or sleeping) he can hold it for a pretty long time, but when he's active and running around, he needs to go outside every 20-30 minutes. I take him to the same spot in the front yard and praise him and give him a treat when he goes, and he's getting the hang of it. Also, he's still getting used to his kennel and doesn't like being locked up, so he gets pretty noisy. If I want him to settle down, putting a blanket over his kennel really helps.

    I know this isn't much info, but hopefully it helps in your first week with your pup. If you'll give me your email address, I'll send you a great article my breeder sent me on early puppy pointing and developing the GWP's natural instinct to point. Good luck with your pup!

    Barron
    Congrats on the new Drahthaar. I know I have a lot learn so anything helps.

  5. #5
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    Default

    I purchased a shorthair while stationed in Germany and took him throught he German hunting dog course and had both of us "certified". The dogs had to pass blood trail, retrieving, coursing and obedience. The wirehairs I had had knowledge of were darn smart, great hunters, stubborn and great dogs. More of a one person dog then the shorthairs seemed to be. We aslo did the pointing training and he picked that up quite naturally.

  6. #6
    Member 2jumpersplease's Avatar
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    Default Wirehairs

    Live2hunt,

    I have two wirehairs now and they are completely different personalities and builds.

    The first one I got at the pound and she turned out to be an AKC registered German Wirehired Pointer ( I thought she was a Griffon because she is small). She is 8.5 years old and people still think she is a puppy because of her energy level. Her bad habits included running off, refusing to fetch, no obedience, and in general being an extremely soft dog. She was also skin and bones with a bad ear infection. We found out she was a GWP when she ran off and returned to her previous owner's home after about two weeks. By giving her attention, I have been able to get her healthy, get her some manners, and force fetch train her. She is not perfect (far ranging and thinks we like to hunt squirrels), but we have fun hunting and she is a good citizen at our house. Because she continues to get better with time, I attribute most of her problems to a lack of attention from her previous owner.

    My second dog is a six month old Deutsch Drahthaar. He is growing and getting more energy every day he is already bigger than the female. No soft dog tendencies from him. He also loves to be around people and hunts close. This dog has shorter hair which I thought would make him colder in Fairbanks, but he stays just as warm as the longer haired dog and does not require brushing. In the house, the female will sit off by herself, but this pup wants to lay next to me or my wife. This dog also has a natural tendency to retrieve, in fact he loves just to have something in his mouth, so we have to watch him pretty close with our personal possessions.

    These are the only two hunting dogs I've owned, but from them my opinion is get a puppy (no bad habits), give it obedience training, do some gun conditioning, and start hunting.

    I live in Fairbanks if you would like to meet the dogs.

  7. #7
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    Default GWP

    It is always an interesting experience getting a dog from the pound. I have rescued two myself. After considering my hunting needs I think I am leaning a bit more towards the Drahthaar. All of GWP kennels I have contacted said their dogs range far (like 400-500 yds) but still hold on point. That is a bit more then I need. One of the Drahthaar kennels I am looking at is located in Germany. All of his references check out and he has a couple of Drahthaar pup’s at this time. I have heard the Germans have a few more breeding requirements then some of US breeders but I have not confirmed that nor do I know the significance of it. I would love to check out your dogs but unfortunately I live in Anchorage. However, if I make up your way this summer I'll make sure to hit you up.

  8. #8
    Member 2jumpersplease's Avatar
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    Default

    I talked to several DD breeders that had litters listed at the website link below. They all loved to talk about the breeding/testing requirements as much as I wanted. I did look at other breeds and breed organizations. In the end the strict breeding requirements for all VDD registered Drahthaars was a big factor for me. I also spent time talking to Griffon and Brittany breeders, most were extremely honest, but I would ask for paper copies of hip tests and hunt test scores because not everybody I talked to could produce them to back up their claims.

    http://www.vdd-gna.org/index.php

  9. #9
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    Default Drahthaar

    Quote Originally Posted by 2jumpersplease View Post
    I talked to several DD breeders that had litters listed at the website link below. They all loved to talk about the breeding/testing requirements as much as I wanted. I did look at other breeds and breed organizations. In the end the strict breeding requirements for all VDD registered Drahthaars was a big factor for me. I also spent time talking to Griffon and Brittany breeders, most were extremely honest, but I would ask for paper copies of hip tests and hunt test scores because not everybody I talked to could produce them to back up their claims.

    http://www.vdd-gna.org/index.php
    The German breeder I have spoken with sent me a geneaology for the past four generations of the Sire and Dame. They both produced solid scores on the VJP and HZP with an average score of 70 and 191, respectively. Also both scored prize one in the VGP and the Dame scored prize 1 in DW. Do you anticipate testing your Drahthaar through VDD? From the sounds of things they do not anticipate another testing in Alaska for VJP and HZP for a couple of years. I guess there is just not enough pup's registered to make it feasible.

    How does your Drahthaar get along with your other dog?

  10. #10
    Member 2jumpersplease's Avatar
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    Default

    It sounds like you have been doing your homework.

    My dogs get along great. It took about a week for them to get used to each other. Due to some discipline, they are mostly calm (except when I let the pup out of his crate in the morning) in the house. They chase each other and wrestle like maniacs in the yard. I haven't let them hunt together much because I don't like that the pup is encouraged to range out further.

    I don't know if there will be any tests in AK for 2009 or not. You are right that it depends on the number of pups and that none are currently scheduled. I would like very much to do the German tests or even NAVHDA to see how they work and participate in the effort to improve the breed. There are several VJP (natural ability tests) scheduled in the lower 48 this spring for those with a bigger dog budget than mine.

    Are you talking to a breeder that is located in Germany? It seems like shipping costs would be a major factor. They sure were for me from the L48. At least two of the breeders I talked to had bred their females while in Germany for hunt tests this fall. It seems to me there is a lot of German blood in the Drahthaar lines being bred in the US. On the other hand, cultural experience of learning about Germany and German hunting traditions would be an attractive reason to look there for a dog or take a dog there to test if one had the cash.

  11. #11
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    Default Gwp's - love 'em.

    G'day L2HAK,
    Posted the following re a thread by Billybob. It says it all for me!



    G'day BILLYBOB,

    In Sth/east Australia the G.W.P.'s are a very popular Sambar Deer dog.

    Probably the MOST popular, and rightly so!

    I know other owners who use them on ducks and quail and further north on feral pigs.

    My dog is approaching 2yr old in Jan'09 and is going well. He has a wonderful temperament and loves our grandkids, four boys up to 4 1/2 yrs old who are pretty boisterous with him.

    I use the dog to point the deer, as the Sambar are absolutely the masters of letting you walk past them without moving.

    In the heavier cover they will stay still even when you may be only five metres away. The dog is pretty handy then!

    Good luck with your pups, hope they go to hunting owners.

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