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Thread: Rain gear or waders for moose?

  1. #1

    Default Rain gear or waders for moose?

    I'm looking at the HH Impertech rain gear for a hunt this fall. I already went through one set but liked the stuff. I know I want the longer jacket next time around but trying to decide if I should go with bibs .... or if I'll be spending the entire trip in waist high waders anyway and shouldn't worry about the bibs. I really do like the waist height waders that Cabelas has. Higher than hip boots but cooler and more comfortable than chest waders. I'll be in one camp on a small lake the entire time so not floating although we will have an inflatable canoe. Also I'll be near Galena until the 25th so I'd imagine it could get chilly up that way by then. Any suggestions? Thanks

  2. #2
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Default

    You have to be ready for constant rain on any hunt in Alaska. My normal gear is a HH top and some type of waders, Last year I bought some new Hodgman zippered waders and Korkers Streamborn Wading Boots, which have interchangeable soles. It is nice to have felt for the rocky parts of the river and change into the lugs for the mud. This is a great setup for wet conditions. Also keeps your backside dry when in sit down in the wet moss. Use base layers and fleece to stay warm as needed. Works for me.

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  3. #3
    Member Phil's Avatar
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    Default Waist High Waders

    for me. I mostly do float hunts when I'm after moose but the constant rain makes a combination of a rain jacket and waist high waders hard to beat. IMHO

  4. #4
    Member tboehm's Avatar
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    Default +1 on korkers

    I bought them last year for my float hunt and they were great!!

  5. #5
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    Default Waders

    The hip waders seem to do pretty well. Their high enough to get through the boggy areas but still allow enough mobility to hike.
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    Member TWB's Avatar
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    I was thinkin about a breathable hip style wader this (Neos) year and and the HH guide length jacket versus tops/bottoms and rubber boots. I'd rather know I'm gettin a bit wet due to sweat and control it with breathable gear than have gear that won't resist it.
    We do not go to the green woods and crystal waters to rough it, we go to smooth it. We get it rough enough at home; in towns and cities; in shops, offices, stores, banks anywhere that we may be placed

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil View Post
    for me. I mostly do float hunts when I'm after moose but the constant rain makes a combination of a rain jacket and waist high waders hard to beat. IMHO
    I agree, this is exactly what I do as well but this coming year I am going to try the breathable waist high hippers.

  8. #8
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    I have only used the stockingfoot waders 1 fall and it was a cold experience - Only boot foot waders with good insulation for me. Usually temperatures aren't that cold but once was enough.

    Wore the stocking foot boots all day and went to bed while the temperature dropped below freezing - The joy of putting your feet inside ice blocks in the morning never to be warm again that trip-

    I prefer the heavy neoprene waders with boots that have lots of insulation. They provide bouyancy, dryness, and warmth. With weight being a premium so you can only have 1 set I opt for the tall boots with the assumption that if I don't have them circumstances will assure that I wished I did.

    Something like this would work:

    http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/te...614&id=0021566

  9. #9

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    http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/te...set=ISO-8859-1

    These are what I had in mind. Seems like they'd be great with the guide length jacket. Better than hip boots for sitting down etc. and keeping the lower half dry but easier to move around in than chest waders. Also less sweating on your upper body where you can layer according to conditions. At $90 the price isn't too bad either. They also make a stocking foot version if you like your wading shoes.

  10. #10
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Neos River Trekker, are another way to go, they slip on over your regular hunting boots. I have been using them for years. I just upgraded to a new camo pair this year. I never go on any hunt without them, They are light, roll up nice and are quick to put on. Great for crossing streams. They are nice because you can wear a very comfortable hiking boot and still have dry feet. If you buy a pair take the boots you plan on using to the store and try them on over your hunting boots. Great gear...
    Me wearing the old green style.

    The wife in hers.

    Me in the new camo ones with my buddy's caribou.

    Neos link
    http://www.overshoe.com/recreational...ewproducts.php
    These are great for when you need to just get thru a wet spot or cross a river and don't want to be in chest or waist waders, which don't have the best boots for long walks.

    Just a note on those zippered waders, they are nice because you can zip them down to air out while not in the water. Makes it nice to answer nature call as well.

    Steve
    "I refuse to let the things I can't do stop me from doing the things I can"
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  11. #11

    Default

    Those look similar to the Sourdough Slippers that Bob Hodson sells at Barney's Sport Chalet. Lightweight & good for the occasional crossing but not durable enough to hunt in all day for a week or more.

    Nice pictures!

  12. #12
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Default Neoprene wader issues

    Quote Originally Posted by rambling raven View Post
    I have only used the stockingfoot waders 1 fall and it was a cold experience - Only boot foot waders with good insulation for me. Usually temperatures aren't that cold but once was enough.

    Wore the stocking foot boots all day and went to bed while the temperature dropped below freezing - The joy of putting your feet inside ice blocks in the morning never to be warm again that trip-

    I prefer the heavy neoprene waders with boots that have lots of insulation. They provide bouyancy, dryness, and warmth. With weight being a premium so you can only have 1 set I opt for the tall boots with the assumption that if I don't have them circumstances will assure that I wished I did.

    Something like this would work:

    http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/te...614&id=0021566
    Raven,

    I prefer breathables over neoprene for the following reasons:

    1. Light weight. Neoprenes are bulky and heavy, breathables are light and take almost no room.

    2. Condensation issues. Neoprene is not breathable, but retains 100% of your body moisture, which leads to damp, clammy, cold clothes.

    3. Insulation. There's an illusion that neoprenes are warmer. In and of itself, neoprene is warmer than breathable fabric, but you overcome that by wearing good insulated clothing underneath. Proof that this works lies in the fact that divers have mostly moved away from neoprene dry suits to fabric suits with insulating garments underneath. It works. On the other end of the scale, neoprene is very hot on warm days, and you cannot eliminate that problem.

    4. Buoyancy. I see this as a negative. If you wade into deep water, neoprene tends to float you off the bottom. That's exactly when I want my feet solidly on the bottom, especially in current. The worst case scenario is that your feet come out from under you and you're floating legs-up. This issue is accentuated by air being pushed toward the highest part of the wader (your feet at that point), making it difficult or impossible to regain your footing, and increasing your chances of drowning. Divers wearing dry suits go through special training to learn how to overcome this issue.

    5. Ease of repair. It's much harder to find and repair leaks in a neoprene wader than in a breathable one.

    6. Ease of drying. The only area my breathables collect moisture is in the neoprene sock foot. To dry them every day, I simply turn them inside out and place them between my sleeping bag and pad. In the morning they're bone-dry. It is much more difficult to dry out neoprene waders, and impossible to dry this way if they have molded in boots.



    The two negatives I see with breathables are that they're noisy in the brush, and somewhat fragile and susceptible to tearing if you're not very careful.

    I prefer the stocking-foot type, which allow me to wear plenty of insulating socks. Wear a good wading shoe over those and you're good to go.

    Hope it helps!

    -Mike
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  13. #13
    Member cusackla's Avatar
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    Default Cabelas Waders and backcountry wading boots

    I use Cabelas Gortex waders with a pair of their back country wader boots that have cleated rubber soles. They are comfortable and great for both in and out of the water. Where we hunt, we have to pack our gear to the river and climb to several of our spotting locations. I have found that I can wear the waders no matter what we are doing packing, spotting or rafting and be prepaired for either a change in weather or an un-planned river crossing. Not to mention, that you don't have to worry about where you sit.
    They are sized to allow for layering in the boot and the wader. They are a little nozy for stalking, but a pair of camo sweats over them, quite's them right down.
    Nothing better in my book.

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  14. #14
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    Default Both

    Here's the setup I use and it works for me. Breathable hip waders with a good wading boot and a pair of HH (or Grundens, etc) rain bibs cut off at the knee. I first saw somebody do it when I was a fish tech in Southeast AK. The advantage is that you can take the bibs off when you are hiking or otherwise don't need them. When you're crashing wet brush or sitting you have the extra protection. Cut-off bibs are easier to pack and easier to walk in than full length bibs. I'm using Korkers Streamborn boots now and like them but have also used an oversized pair of light-hikers and they worked just as well.

  15. #15

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    For the weight factor I use HH impertech and calf high rubber muck boots. I do the poor man waders and wrap duct tape around the HH pants and on the boots. It works well and I have not got wet doing this. Also it is very light. Minor wet spots this works well. I carry a set of Barney's hip cordura overboots for deeper or longer exposure. Never found a need this year for them. However hunting in the rain gear was a constant.

  16. #16
    Member akshrop's Avatar
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    Default

    This combo is a bit of a highjack as I wear it on a boat, but dang itís comfortable: neoprene socks and sandals. They are great around the camp after hiking or standing all day. They are water proof, warm, and comfy. Sorry for the highjack, now back to the program already in progress.

  17. #17
    Supporting Member AFHunter's Avatar
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    Default Breathables for me

    If I am going to be anywhere near a river or around water over a foot deep. I am in my breathable waders. I live in my breathable waders during moose season. I take my HH Impertech rainjacket and waders and I am as dry and warm as if I did not leave my house. Layer you clothes under the breathables according to outside temps.

    Stid2677/Steve has the perfect set-up for crossing shallow rivers while back-packing. I just have to cough up the money for another hunting accessory and I will own a set as well.

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