Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: Dry bags

  1. #1
    Member jakec5253's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    381

    Default Dry bags

    I am in need of a few good dry bags. A few friends and I are doing a float trip on the Kanektok in July, and I need a couple of good quality dry bags. I am looking for recommendations of good bags, as well as bags to stay away from. Thanks.

    Jake

  2. #2

    Default

    Here are a thread I found after doing a quick search to get ya started.

    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ead.php?t=6557

    Personally, for packrafting I use sea to summit bags cause wait is the issue there. For jet boating and not very splashy rafting I use the cheap walmart brand (tex-sport??).

    I imagine you might want something a little more robust if way in the backcountry though, but my el cheapo brand has been dunked a few times and even with the sweet duct tape patches everything is still dry.

  3. #3
    Moderator AKmud's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Wasilla, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    3,185

    Default

    These are the ones I use and they are tough as nails - Cabelas

    I've got two different sizes and they have been used and abused for years with no leaks, rips, buckle failures yet (knock on wood!).
    AKmud
    http://i78.photobucket.com/albums/j96/AKmud/213700RMK1-1.jpg


    The porcupine is a peacful animal yet God still thought it necessary to give him quills....

  4. #4
    Member jakec5253's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    381

    Default thanks

    Thanks for the info. I did a search before I posted, but I was curious if there were more opinions out there. I have been doing some looking online, and I am interested in the NRS bags, anyone have experience with them?

    Jake

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    614

    Default

    i was a bit skeptical, but a friend had some walmart (yellow ones) dry bags on a float this past summer. They work great and are tough. I would suggest them as a good low price alternative. I am a firm believer in you get what you pay for, but these worked great.

  6. #6

    Default

    Sea-line makes very good dry bags. My oldest is 18 yrs old and has seen some serious use.

  7. #7
    Member danattherock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    5,608

    Default

    Two thoughts...

    One, you get tough dry bags that are made to be thrown around and take abuse. These are heavy and pricey. I have done this twice and it works well, but you find yourself digging for gear more in my opinion and it can be harder to pack the canoe/raft.

    Two, you get a bunch of small super lightweight dry bags and store them in a regular duffle bag (or similar). The duffle bag takes the abuse and can be a cheapo. The lighter (and cheaper) dry bags on the inside don't contend with gravel bar abuse and will last for a very long time if you are transporting them in a duffle. Easy to find stuff, easy to pack in a canoe/raft as you can throw them all over if out of the duffle bag. Lots of advantages.

    I have gone both routes. I like the smaller, lighter, and more numerous dry bags inside the duffle bag. It is easier to find gear as it is more compartmentalized, saves you a bunch of weight, and you have several small bags to carry around at camp instead of one or two mammoth dry bags of gear. I would hate to pull a back muscle on a float trip. Nothing most of us would think about until it happened. Hindsight is always 20/20.

    For the light bags, look at Outdoor Research bags on Campmor. I have used these for three float trips and they all look brand new. Super quality. I got one in every size for the wife and I (different colors so we can tell them apart). Clothes in the big bag, sleeping bag in the next, down to personal items/hygeine in the smallest. Great bags.

    If you want big super duty stuff rather than the small lightweight bags in the duffle bag approach, look at Pacific Outdoors Wytex. I have two large backpacks and two smaller ones. Super nice stuff, but heavy.

    Either route you choose, your gear will be 100% dry. The below bags come in different sizes. I just put a link to Campmor because it was convenient. You can visit the manufacturers websites for more info. Below are a few links...

    http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/Product___81486

    http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/Product___71480
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  8. #8
    Member danattherock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    5,608

    Default

    I should also mention there is a cheaper option.

    On one of my earlier float trips, I got a bunch of the $12 Ozark Trail (Walmart) yellow dry bags. Dirt cheap and they held up surprisingly well. Scuffed uf a good bit after a 13 day trip in arctic NW. But they were hauled around in our Ally canoes for two weeks and spent a lot of time on gravel bars. Rained hard several days and never got a drop of water in the bags. The shoulder straps are weak points compared to the more expensive Pacific Outdoors "Gobi" Wytex bags. But they are 1/10 the price so it is to be expected. But if you are not portaging very much, or none at all like on the Kanektok, this is a non-issue. Below are a few images of the Walmart bags in use.





    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  9. #9

    Default

    Working as a guide in N. and S. America, and as a field biologist for many years, I’ve lived with dry bags since they first came out many years ago, Owned dozens of them. I personally rate SOTAR bags as the best.

    For items I really want to keep dry - such as clothing and sleeping bag - I follow danattherock’s strategy of OR lightweight bags stuffed inside a bigger bag, except the small bags are put in a good dry bag – not a cheap duffle; i.e. “dry bags in a dry bag.” Spend a solid 10 days of rain on the Kanektok in August and you’ll know why. Admittedly, this is the most expensive option. Price is less of a consideration when you do it for a living.

    Dan’s strategy of taking a larger number of smaller bags, instead of a few big bags, is especially appropriate when packing canoes or kayaks and you're not portaging. Good advice.

    Another thing to consider: invest in daypack-sized dry bag. Simms fishing makes one I like (their Dry Creek daypack). This is your handy grab bag for day use: binoculars, maps, small personal items, etc.

  10. #10
    Member danattherock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    5,608

    Default

    [QUOTE=Tsiutoo;389495] I personally rate SOTAR bags as the best.
    :[QUOTE]


    That is for sure! I bought a Sotar raft a few months back from Goo Vogt (Alaska Wildwater) in Anchorage. He is a cool guy and threw in a free medium sized Sotar dry bag. I have never seen anything like it. In a league of its own. From what I could tell, it was the same material the raft was made from (which is bombproof). Polyurethane impregnated nylon if I am not mistaken.
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  11. #11

    Default

    I just noticed via their web site that SOTAR bags are 40% off until Dec 31.
    www.sotar.com

  12. #12
    Member muskeg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Hollis
    Posts
    963

    Default see inside

    I use lots of Dry Bags ..... and I do like the see trough types .... saves a lot of digging around.

  13. #13
    Member steelguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Wrangell/NJ
    Posts
    216

    Default clear bags

    Muskeg beat me to it. I use quite a few dry bags in SE Alaska, rains all the time I'm there. I especially like the clear bags so I can quickly see and get at what I want without emptying the whole bag. My larger bags a Seal Line and can be found at: www.seallinegear.com/ - 16k Not sure if Seal Line offers a clear type.

    Campmor has great prices and service. I also like the backpack with straps bag for my day trips, easy to carry with a rod in one hand and shotgun in the other.

  14. #14

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jakec5253 View Post
    Thanks for the info. I did a search before I posted, but I was curious if there were more opinions out there. I have been doing some looking online, and I am interested in the NRS bags, anyone have experience with them?

    Jake
    I have 2 NRS 3.8 Bill's Dry Bags. I've used them in hunting in Alaska and for just about everything else down in here in Louisiana. I think so much of them that I bought my nephew and my brother-in-law their own for when I go up with them hunting for moose or caribou in the next year or so.
    "The days a man spends fishing or spends hunting should not be deducted from the time he's on earth. " Theodore Roosevelt

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •