Results 1 to 19 of 19

Thread: Electronics for "manual" motors

  1. #1

    Default Electronics for "manual" motors

    Merry Christmas! A friend has an aluminum set net skiff with twin 80's era 40 hp 2-stroke Evinrudes. These motors are completely "non electric" in the sense that they are rope start only and no tilt/trim. That being the case, he has nothing electronic on the boat: no fish/depth finder, no radio, no bilge, etc. Is there a way to mount the basics somehow (bilge, radio, small fish/depth finder)? I guess what I'm asking is do these motors have the capability to power anything electronic and if so, how would you connect/hookup everything? They need electrical current to energize and fire the coil/plugs right? I thought of just wiring this stuff directly to a 12 volt deep cycle battery (that was charged at home base) with in-line fuses; on a full charge, will a battery power this stuff if we're not running everything all the time? He wants to expand his fishing capabilities without having to re-power for electical reasons. Motors run great and have low hours.
    Thanks,
    Jim

  2. #2
    Supporting Member bullbuster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Mean streets of Fairview
    Posts
    1,138

    Default

    Stop by J Kimberly's place and run it by him. He's the Johnson/Evinrude king.

    On Arctic, just north of Raspberry, in the orange building.
    Live life and love it
    Love life and live it

  3. #3
    Member Larsenvega's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    Posts
    348

    Default

    I would venture to guess that it would cost a small fortune for him to aquire the parts necessary to get power from those older motors. With that said, it'd probably be easier and cheaper for him to just run this small items off of a deep-cycle marine battery. A decent battery would hold enough charge to power all the things you listed for at least 3 days of use before a full recharge would be necessary. I run my fishfinder, gps, and running lights in this fashion and just trickle-charge my battery after each outing.

  4. #4

    Default Well Bull,

    I'd love to do that if I were there; I live on Kauai! I might give them a call you at your recommendation.
    Thanks,
    Jim

  5. #5

    Default LarsenVega,

    How do you hook that stuff up? Directly to the terminal post?
    Thanks for the help, that may be the way to go (cheapest & easiest).
    Jim

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,246

    Default

    Iím going to do some speculating, back in the 80 they also had to charge a boat battery. Under the cowing there may be a connector with the motor running you will have 13v dc across two of the wires or you will have 12-16v ac. If you have 12-16v ac app $5 in parts will convert the ac voltage to 13v dc to charge a battery. Finding someone to help you find the wires and wire the battery could be a problem.

    Goodluck.

  7. #7
    Member Akgramps's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Last civilized place on the planet
    Posts
    2,077

    Default

    Certainly they have power for the ignition system, so the motor would have a alternator, unless for some reason erude was using CDI ignitions at that time?
    Isnt there a erude dealer in Kauai?

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Kodiak
    Posts
    650

    Default Solar panel

    Deep cycle battery with a Brunton solar panel? I carry a small solar panel on hunting trips that works like a trickle charger, if there is any sun. You might have more of that there, so I think it is feasible.

  9. #9

    Default

    Sounds like the least expensive way to go is the separate battery. Gramps, the ignition system is good 'ole rope start. It'll be like pulling teeth to get my buddy to spruce up the boat, but I figure the bilge & radio (CB/VHF) are safety items so I'm gonna push him to do it.
    He keeps telling me to get him motivated to get this thing going (hasn't been in the water for at least a year. There's enough opportunity to go fishing after work, etc. as we each only live about 5-10 minutes from the ramp, but a fish/depth finder is a must if bottom fishing.
    Thanks for all the help guys,
    Jim

  10. #10
    Member Akgramps's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Last civilized place on the planet
    Posts
    2,077

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Big Jim View Post
    Sounds like the least expensive way to go is the separate battery. Gramps, the ignition system is good 'ole rope start. It'll be like pulling teeth to get my buddy to spruce up the boat, but I figure the bilge & radio (CB/VHF) are safety items so I'm gonna push him to do it.
    He keeps telling me to get him motivated to get this thing going (hasn't been in the water for at least a year. There's enough opportunity to go fishing after work, etc. as we each only live about 5-10 minutes from the ramp, but a fish/depth finder is a must if bottom fishing.
    Thanks for all the help guys,
    Jim
    Even rope start motors have an ignition system, powered by a alternator, so there should be a spot to connect a battery?

  11. #11

    Default Gramps,

    I kinda thought that originally, but wasn't sure. I'll have to dig into this deeper; maybe get a wiring schematic for these motors. Thanks!
    Jim

  12. #12
    Member Larsenvega's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    Posts
    348

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Big Jim View Post
    How do you hook that stuff up? Directly to the terminal post?
    Thanks for the help, that may be the way to go (cheapest & easiest).
    Jim
    Exactly. I went down to my local RadioShack and picked up the medium-sized black and red alligator clips and attached them to the wires, which make it easier to attach and detach the electronics each time. Good luck to you in either case.

  13. #13

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Akgramps View Post
    Even rope start motors have an ignition system, powered by a alternator, so there should be a spot to connect a battery?

    They are not necessarily powered by an alternator. Many motors are powered by a magneto. This is how your lawnmower, chainsaw, weedwacker, and even old airplanes power their sparkplugs. While very different from an alternator, they do have some similar internal parts.

  14. #14

    Default Larsen,

    Did you wire your accessories directly to the battery or put a fuse in their somewhere?
    Jim

  15. #15

    Smile Re-powering

    If the boat is down in the Kenai area, has he thought about up grading to some newer 2 stroke 40hp motors. They are starting to come of the river boats cheap. Some will come with electric start and power trim for between $400 and $800. I personally wouldn't trust a bilge pump hooked to a battery only. If you need the pump, you need to make sure it has an unlimited power supply. Just 2 cents worth.

  16. #16
    Member Larsenvega's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Tucson, AZ
    Posts
    348

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Big Jim View Post
    Did you wire your accessories directly to the battery or put a fuse in their somewhere?
    Jim
    An inline fuse would be a good idea, but all last season I was just running my items directly off of the battery. I am using a fully sealed PS Power Sonic nautical battery, which has delivered constant and consistent power for me. But now that you brought that up, I may be visiting my local RadioShack to pick up some fuses. Another project! At least I can tell the wife that this one will only last about 30 minutes, avoiding her usual comment of "I thought you died out there in the garage..."

  17. #17

    Default Do you need a stator?

    I believe you can get a stator/flywheel combo that will generate power from those motors. I am not sure if you need a new flywheel or the stock one will work. The part should look something like this and mounts under the flywheel. http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/Parts...1%7C240%3A1318
    Check with a dealer to see what parts you will need and then see if you can find some on ebay or a used parts dealer. Good luck.

  18. #18

    Default Fuses are really nice

    I can't imagine wiring something without a fuse, circut breaker, or a fusable link. You guys are brave. Without something to interrupt the power from the battery in case of a short or some other malfunction, the only fuse you have is your 14 guage wire. When I was a kid and worked in the wreking yard a long time ago, a handful of cars came in every year that had electrical modification performed by the owners that caught on fire. A fuse is cheap and highly recommended in book.

  19. #19

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Shanonamous View Post
    I believe you can get a stator/flywheel combo that will generate power from those motors. I am not sure if you need a new flywheel or the stock one will work. The part should look something like this and mounts under the flywheel. http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/Parts...1%7C240%3A1318
    Check with a dealer to see what parts you will need and then see if you can find some on ebay or a used parts dealer. Good luck.
    When I looked into making my 30 hp Johnson an electric start, it was about 400 dollars to do it with all ebay and other junk parts. I needed the flywheel,, the starter, the stater, the brackets, and a variety of other nuts and bolts to do it. As a result, I still pull on the darn thing to start it. What a pain.....

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •