Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Pre purchase sea trial in winter

  1. #1

    Default Pre purchase sea trial in winter

    Im looking at a 1993 28' powerline pilot boat in Seward and was wondering if anyone has bought a boat in winter or if it is a bad idea? Should I wait until spring? It has a stand up head so I might have to take his word that it works properly.
    Should I have a marine survey done before or after the sea trial?
    I was also curious how i might talk the seller into filling his fuel tanks for the sea trial so i will have a better idea for how it will react? I know alot of folks are reluctant to sell 150+ gallons of fuel with there boats but a sea trial is pointless without the boat loaded close to how it will usually be loaded.
    Any advice will be appeciated.

  2. #2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fishkiller View Post
    Im looking at a 1993 28' powerline pilot boat in Seward and was wondering if anyone has bought a boat in winter or if it is a bad idea? Should I wait until spring? It has a stand up head so I might have to take his word that it works properly.
    Should I have a marine survey done before or after the sea trial?
    I was also curious how i might talk the seller into filling his fuel tanks for the sea trial so i will have a better idea for how it will react? I know alot of folks are reluctant to sell 150+ gallons of fuel with there boats but a sea trial is pointless without the boat loaded close to how it will usually be loaded.
    Any advice will be appeciated.
    Fishkiller,

    I bought the boat that I have now in the winter. I didn't even go on a sea trial, nor did I get it surveryed. I just wrote the check and took it home before the next guy "stole" it as the price was way too low, and the boat and everything on it was nearly perfect. The man nearly cried when I pulled her out of the driveway.

    But, for other than those rare deals, I would not look at a boat too seriously without going out on it at least for a quick trip around the bay loaded as it would be loaded in a real test. And, depending on what type of boat it was, how it was it used, and whether it was a salt water sitter at the dock for months on end, it would be a good idea to get it surveyed.

    Good luck!

  3. #3
    Member ACBMAN's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Anchorage only because that's where the work is
    Posts
    160

    Default

    For me part of taking care of a boat is having it full of gas to keep condensation out of the tank. What power is on it? My 29' ACB is 8600 pounds full of gas and add 2500+ more with 4 guys and gear, I have twin 225 Yamaha's four strokes which run 30 mph at 4200 rpm and about 1.75 gph on good water.My opinion is never buy a boat without a real world water test unless they are giving it away,good luck.

  4. #4
    Member Kay9Cop's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Wasilla, AK
    Posts
    789

    Default

    I just bought a boat (or actually will tomorrow) this winter without a sea trial. I did have the boat surveyed because it was required for the boat loan, but a survey won't guaratee any of the mechanicals or electrical, just seaworthiness and value.

    In my case, I had recommendations from disinterested parties who had recently been on the boat to verify how it ran this past summer. Also, after speaking with the seller I felt comfortable the boat had been well taken care of and he was not trying to screw me over.
    "Beware the man with only one gun; he may know how to use it."

  5. #5
    Member steelguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Wrangell/NJ
    Posts
    216

    Default my experience

    My friend and I just bought a boat up in Juneau. Before buying, we had both a survey and sea trial done, by the surveyor. Total cost of both was $690 and we consider it money very well spent. We were not able to see the boat beforehand, so we felt it imperative to have these services performed, and were very satisfied with the thoroughness of the survey itself, having used it as a very effective negotiating tool and in effect, paid for itself many times over the cost of the actual survey. An oil analysis is another option, which I understand is fairly inexpensive ($30?), but time (10 days needed) did not allow for this to be done.

    Our previous boat, boat down in Washington, was not surveyed. We did hire a well-recommended mechanic who supplied us with a check-off list. And, he also did a sea trial, but we found a couple of surprises when we eventually saw the boat, mostly minor cosmetic type things.

    Anyway, if you do decide on a survey, I highly recommend the individual is certified. Good luck, and hope you get the boat you want at a good price!

  6. #6
    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer, AK.
    Posts
    4,121

    Default

    I have bought boats with and without a demo run. All worked out O.K.
    For the sea trial we went to Seward and cruised around for a few hours and sealed the deal on the ride home. Owner paid for everything including the tank of gas we ran around the bay on.
    With my jet boat, I bought it at the Sportsmans show after consulting with Steve Mahay, no demo ride either.
    My current ocean boat I bought w/out a demo in October. It was sitting at CAC plastics for sale. The folks at CAC swore up and down how well the owner took care of his equipment and the boat passed my inspection in the yard. The previous owner sat w/me for a lenghty discussion in the boat before we purchased it. I did fire it up in the yard to listen to her run.
    So, it all depends on how comfortable you feel with the condition of the boat and the "vibe" you get from the previous owner. Take a look around his/her yard and check out the condition of thier other "stuff" when you look at it. If you go on a demo, have the owner fill the tank on his dime. Then if you buy it, reimburse him for the fuel costs.
    I don't hold alot of value in a marine survey. Rather look around for same/similiar boats and see how the price compares to the current market. The main thing is that you are knowledgable and wise enough to recognize a "good deal" when you see it. Often these good deals can be had at the end of the season.
    Good luck.
    BK

  7. #7

    Default Thanks

    I appreciate your guys input and will for sure do a sea trial and get a survey before i make the final decision. I just figure it will be easier to do everything this spring then in colder snowy weather. The 28' boat im looking at has a Volvo KAD 300 with a 290 outdrive with 1000hrs. Its being sold for the owner by a diesel shop that has maintained it since it was new. My only real concern is it hasn't been in the water for 3 years though everything looks to be in great condition except the windows may need replacing and the interior could use a remodle.
    Does anyone know of any certified marine surveyers in the anchorage area?

  8. #8
    Member AK NIMROD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    SOLDOTNA, AK
    Posts
    949

    Default

    i've used Orca Services out of eagle river a couple times over the last 15 years....last time was 2004. i was please with his work. i was selling my big boat and wanted to be sure i was in ball park on asking price. was and it still did not sell for years......
    typically i do not believe they check engine or drive line. as far good or bad. i do not think he even ran the boat either time. just noted types of engine, transmission and outdrive. and hrs on the engines.
    quick way to spend better part of $500

    good luck getting that new boat- Pat
    RETIRED U.S.A.F. CAPT.; LIFETIME MEMBER NRA; LIFETIME MEMBER ALASKA BOWHUNTER ASSOC.
    MASTER BOWHUNTER EDUCATION INSTRUCTOR; MEMBER UNITED BLOOD TRACKERS; POPE & YOUNG MEASURER

  9. #9
    Member Soundfisher's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    312

    Default

    Sea trial it first. You may just walk away from it after that. If not, note any concerns and make some calls to some of the shops to question them. Before you go, research the 300 and familiarize yourself with it. As ACBMAN suggested, the tanks should be full, and try to get as close to a full load as possible when you sea trial it.Find out what the WOT should be and make sure that you can achieve that. Then have it surveyed by a highly recommended surveyor.I just bought a 2005 27 Seasport Pilothouse with a diesel in Washington last week. I took it out for a sea trial first. Then had the surveyor come over. The vessel only had 128 hours on it and it is garage kept. Even so, the surveyor still spent over 4 hours looking at it.He checked everything on the vessel, including the electrical systems. He even found a small leak on the HW heater and fixed it. He answered all of my questions and made good suggestions for a diesel owner. Although he doesent do a complete engine inspection, he wanted to have it running for a while to make sure he thought it was sound and passed his visual. I feel that the money spent was worth it, but I also had a good surveyor. Shop around for one and ask lots of questions

  10. #10

    Default

    I appreciate your guys advice, all very good points I will use. I might wait for the sea trial till spring or a warm couple of days so I will be able to check the cabin for any leaks. Thanks again

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •