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Thread: Dangerous Ammunition!!

  1. #1
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    Default Dangerous Ammunition!!

    Read my thread on M329PD Headspacing!!! For Safety Reasons! And for a little background information on this thread.

    Buffalo Bore ammunition primers can be jarred loose, when used in the M329PD, and seat deeper into the pocket of a cartridge resulting in a misfire that may leave you on the receiving end of a Bear attack.

    Buffalo Bore makes a load specific round for the Smith & Wesson M329PD revolver. It is the 255 gr. Kieth Hard Cast, Gas Check, Low Recoil. Regardless of Buffalo Bore claims, this is not to be considered a viable round for the M329PD as the primers on this ammunition can and will change their seating depth while cycling through cylinder being fired.

    My Ruger firing pin being longer than the S&W could fire the faulty rounds and the primers were then thrust back flush with the headstamp face. I would not trust my life, or my fingers, with this ammunition.

    Chris

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    Default dangerous?

    I think you may have a problem with your particularly M329PD.

    Mine doesn't misfire with Buffalo Bore's 255 grain .44 mag ammo. I like that load, and will roll a similar load myself, shortly, with 250 grain LBT hardcasts, so I can afford to shoot more.

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    How can you have a head space problem with a .44 as it head spaces off of the case rim?? ALso it is a straight walled case

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    Quote Originally Posted by swamp creature View Post
    Read my thread on M329PD Headspacing!!! For Safety Reasons! And for a little background information on this thread.

    Buffalo Bore ammunition primers can be jarred loose, when used in the M329PD, and seat deeper into the pocket of a cartridge resulting in a misfire that may leave you on the receiving end of a Bear attack.

    Buffalo Bore makes a load specific round for the Smith & Wesson M329PD revolver. It is the 255 gr. Kieth Hard Cast, Gas Check, Low Recoil. Regardless of Buffalo Bore claims, this is not to be considered a viable round for the M329PD as the primers on this ammunition can and will change their seating depth while cycling through cylinder being fired.

    My Ruger firing pin being longer than the S&W could fire the faulty rounds and the primers were then thrust back flush with the headstamp face. I would not trust my life, or my fingers, with this ammunition.

    Chris
    That is highly unlikely. I read all your test on the other post and I understand why you have come to this but I can't buy it. Does this mis-fire occur in other 329 or just one.

    It may only occur with heavy recoiling ammo but I don't buy that as the reason. I would say it is the gun causing the malfunction and not the ammo. I don't think I have ever heard of primers moving in the pocket under recoil. The primer pockets would have to be oversized. It is possible but I think BB uses Starline brass (with their headstamp) and that is as good as it gets in brass quality and I do believe BB is top quality ammo. You should contact BB about their defective ammo and give them a chance to defend their reputation, see what they say.
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    Today, Sunday, I went to the range again just to double check yesterdays results. I used only Fusion 240 gr. SP. Two boxes, not one misfire. Some extraction tightness, but minor. After two days and too many rounds later, I'm beat. Not a plinking gun, but a dandy packing gun. Sorry to disappoint, but it is the ammo. Maybe a bad batch. I was kind of hoping it to be the gun, since the warranty would cover it. I wanted to use the Buffalo Bore Low Recoil just for that purpose--low recoil. This stuff will work in both of my Rugers, but they have enough heft as to not need reduced recoil rounds. I purchased eight boxes of the BB from Cabelas for the express purpose of using it in the 329PD. It is unobtainable in Jacksonville. I am now, after countless rounds, confident in the M329PD for its intent and purpose. I'm tired of lugging around an SBH in the woods. The Smith is going to work out great after all. BTW, it likes the Speer Gold Dot 240 gr. best. The Fusion was okay, CCI was all over the place (although, I was getting pretty tired by then), Buffalo Bore was fine when it would actually fire. I will definately be in contact with BB Monday. Ammo is all shot up, but I still have the boxes. I am still interested in the Low Recoil ammunition. I am not too proud to say that the recoil of this gun is heavy for me. I finally picked up a S&W 500 today to get a feel for the grips, just to make sure they wouldn't add too much since I do not have Gorilla paws. I am quite pleased to note that although they are bigger than the M329PD supplied grips, they are not overly huge. I will contact S&W for an order. I am a little proud to say that with all of this shooting of a gun that is not normally practised with, I am improving my shot performance with it. I may soon be as good with the 329PD as I am with my much heavier and longer sight range SBH.

    Chris

  6. #6

    Default May be the ammo

    but your theory on what the primers are doing is off. If a primer is not seated all the way into the cup, it is more likely that the round won't fire as the fall of the firing pin only pushes the primer farther into the cup, reducing the striking power of the pin against the primer cup to compress it against the inner anvil. I cannot see how firing the cartridge will "loosen" the primer and the way the recoil reacts between gun and cartridge, it would not force the primer lower.
    I believe you do have a problem with the ammo, but it is more likely that some faulty brass cases might have been used, with some primer pockets formed too deeply. At any rate, it is better to have faulty ammo in this case then a faulty firearm, as there are plenty other rounds out there to use, like Cor-bon.

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    Thanks Mauserboy, I sometimes express myself poorly when I get upset. I will say here for the record that I cannot say precisely what is causing the primers to move, but only that they do. As I stated earlier, after coming to the discovery that the primer seat depth was wrong, I made a check of every round I loaded. All primers were, to my eye and feel, flush with the case head. Subsequent misfires, once removed, showed that the primer of the failed round was no longer flush with the head, but deeper set into the case. Failed rounds had a primer dent in them that was simply too light. Fired rounds had nice indentations on them. These misfires only happened with the one brand. My brother and I have just spent two days at the range trying to determine if it was the ammo or the gun. I cannot say if it was the result of the recoil or the firing pin pushing it in or any other scenario. I can only say that the primers are moving. I started this thread wondering about the headspacing of the gun since it is, ever so slightly, more than any of my other wheelguns. I now believe I got a faulty batch of ammo.

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    The idea of the primer pockets being too deep makes sense. Wonder what would happen if this ammo was shot thru another pistol?

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    As posted in my HEADSPACING thread, I made it back to the indoor range today and went through two boxes of Fusion 240gr. No misfires. It's the ammo for sure. This is the third day of confirmation. I've gotta get in touch with Buffalo Bore.
    Chris

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    Quote Originally Posted by swamp creature View Post
    Thanks Mauserboy, I sometimes express myself poorly when I get upset. I will say here for the record that I cannot say precisely what is causing the primers to move, but only that they do. As I stated earlier, after coming to the discovery that the primer seat depth was wrong, I made a check of every round I loaded. All primers were, to my eye and feel, flush with the case head. Subsequent misfires, once removed, showed that the primer of the failed round was no longer flush with the head, but deeper set into the case. Failed rounds had a primer dent in them that was simply too light. Fired rounds had nice indentations on them. These misfires only happened with the one brand. My brother and I have just spent two days at the range trying to determine if it was the ammo or the gun. I cannot say if it was the result of the recoil or the firing pin pushing it in or any other scenario. I can only say that the primers are moving. I started this thread wondering about the headspacing of the gun since it is, ever so slightly, more than any of my other wheelguns. I now believe I got a faulty batch of ammo.
    Well this seems as though your are right, it is likely the ammo and specifically the primers. But the primers are not seated to the bottom of the pocket and move when struck by the hammer blow. Either way I will agree with you it isthe ammo. This ammo may work in a different type of gun such as a Ruger blackhawk, but it should work in your 329. Contact Tim Sundles at Buffalo Bore and see what he says. I would like a sample of that ammo for some testing, where can I get some.?
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



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