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Thread: Food-hold, Killer-style, or snares?

  1. #1

    Default Food-hold, Killer-style, or snares?

    I'm new to trapping in Alaska, so I'd just like to hear what y'all have to say about the types of traps you like to use. Do you prefer to use mostly snares, because they're lighter and cheaper than other types, or do you use foot-hold traps and conibears for effectiveness? I'm mostly interested in trapping fox and lynx right now, but I'd like to get into all of the furbearer species eventually, so all ideas are welcome. Thanks!

    Barron

    PS - Here are a few other questions I have:

    - How often do you check your trap lines?
    - On average, how many sets do you usually have in a line?
    - Do you mark your traps in any way? If so, how? Flagging tape, signs, GPS?
    - Do you post signs to warn others about your trap lines? I don't think the regs require this, but the idea makes sense to me.

  2. #2
    New member
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    Mar 2008
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    Wasilla Ak
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    For k-9 and cats I found that snares are easiest to keep working in freeze thaw situations, and their light and inexpensive. I check my sets every other day normally, but if the weather gets really warm, I check every day. The number of sets depends on where you are, my lines are close to home, so I usually do a few lines with 10-15 sets per. As far as posting a sign, this could go both ways, it could keep people away, or be an invitation to look for your sets and steal them. It's pretty much a crap shoot.

  3. #3

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    Thanks for the input. The reason I asked about how often you check your sets is because I'd like to go set some traps this weekend in an area about 2 hours from home in Anchorage, which means that I wouldn't be able to go check them again until next weekend. Of course, this has the potential to see a trapped animal sitting with his foot caught in a trap for about a week. I'd feel guilty about it, but I'm not sure if there's another option for someone who wants to trap while living in Anchorage. Any thoughts?

    Barron

  4. #4
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    Mar 2008
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    Wasilla Ak
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    Use snares, if properly set they will dispatch the critters most of the time, no guarantees, or use cubbies with a 330 conibear for the cats. Just remember, if the weather gets warm where the critters wont freeze when dead, the ethical thing to do is check em daily so they dont get rotten and wasted. Just another 2 cents.

  5. #5
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    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks but Temporarily in Dayton OH
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    I use # 3 footholds for cats, you could always use the soft catch traps. I have set snares and some coni's for marten. I know guys that all they do is set 5-6 dozen snares. But up here everything freezes LOL. Good luck

  6. #6
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    Jun 2006
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    Bristol Bay
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    Every situation you come on in trapping is going to be different. I prefer to be able to handel all situations and so have an arsenal of several hunderd foothold about 175 conis and the good lord only knows how many snares all in various sizes. The amount of sets I have out at any given time varies greatly with time of year, the particualr part of my line I am working and main target species. It can range from 10-150. The amount of times I am on the line also depends on weather during warm spells i am out more often to stop green bellies in snares. I hit the beaver hard early during open water and will mass set conis for a long weekend to get the 40-60 we want for the year. cold snaps I will sometimes go as long as a week but prefer to be on the line every three days. This has proven to be the most profitable for me. I use no flagging I will mark through the ice sets on the tundra with a long pole with the branches still attached so i can find the exact location without diggin a crater after a storm. I fortunaltey live and trap in an area where a sign is not anything i would even consider as no one really gets on my trails. I do plot certain sets into my GPS these are ones that are in new locations or near creek and river crossings or on the open tundra so I can find them without doing an occassional circle during whiteouts on the wide open country I tend to trap the most.
    meats meat don't knock it till you try it

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