Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 23

Thread: how long are batteries supposed to last?

  1. #1
    Member arcticfox77's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    anchorage
    Posts
    191

    Default how long are batteries supposed to last?

    bought my boat two years ago and i never looked to see how the battery was. it ran well these past two seasons without any problems. was wondering how often to change the batteries. gonna have to wait till spring to check to see what the battery condition is like. where would i pick up a new one if it needs to be replaced? any info appreciated.

  2. #2

    Default

    1997 pickup and I just replaced the battery this year. In boats that you don't use all of the time I think it would be 5 or 6 years if you bought quality ones to start with.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    260

    Default Battery Maint.

    Like cars - there are several different factors to deal with when your talking about batteries. A lot has to do with the care and maintenance they receive. If you bring them inside in the winter and keep them at or near full charge they should last at least four seasons. The again you have to take into consideration the type of use they get and the quality
    they were when new. As far as replacements - I would go with the new gel-cell type battery - or the Interstate MEGA-TRON marine battery.
    Main thing is to keep them clean and charged.

  4. #4

    Default

    akfishnut sums it up well. The most important thing with batteries is to maintain a full state of charge whenever possible while keeping the electrolite level full. If a battery gets too low or goes dead it will freeze ( assuming it is outdoors of course) warping the plates and making it completely useless. A well made and maintained battery should easily last 5 to 7 years.

    Interstate batteries are top shelf and they offer the optima line as well if you want to spend for them.

  5. #5
    Member arcticfox77's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    anchorage
    Posts
    191

    Default so i guess ill have to get another one...

    well for the past two seasons i have left the battery in the boat. the boat has been in the backyard and been shrinkwrapped since ive owned it. so i guess its a nono to leave it in the boat over the winter?

  6. #6
    Member Crumm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks, AK
    Posts
    505

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by arcticfox77 View Post
    I guess its a nono to leave it in the boat over the winter?
    It is a good idea to disconnect it to be sure it does not get drained. Nothing wrong with leaving it in the boat as long as it is fully charged. A charged battery will not freeze, a dead one will.

  7. #7
    Member NewMoon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Holladay, UT
    Posts
    126

    Default

    If you're considering a new super-trouble-free battery, look at AGM, not Gel. Gel is an older technology that requires charging at lower voltages.

    Some of the best AGM's on the market these days are those made by East Penn Deka (sold under many labels, including West Marine, but available much cheaper at an industrial battery distributor), and the Sears Platinums made by Odyssey.

    My Deka house bank AGM's are still going strong after 8 seasons, and I just replaced my Optima AGM start batteries with Deka's after 8 seasons.
    Richard Cook
    New Moon (Bounty 257)
    "Cruising in a Big Way"

  8. #8

    Default

    I would also check Costco. They carry marine batteries and I'm guessing at a cheaper price and similar quality to name brands.

  9. #9
    Member Xanfly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    159

    Default

    For me since I only have 1 Battery in the boat I replace it every 3 years and keep it inside during the winter.

    I just use the good old AC/Delco Marine from the auto parts store.
    $75 every few years is nothing compared to the other money that goes into a boat. With all the other things that can go wrong, this is one thing I don't want to worry about.

  10. #10

    Default Batteries

    Right, wrong or indifferent. I leave mine on the boat, hook a charger with a timer to trickle charge a couple of hours/day.

  11. #11
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default

    Batteries can last 5-7 years if properly maintained, but a battery going out on a boat is a different ball game then in a vehicle. If you're runnig a single battery, I'd say change every 2-3 years, heck they're only ~$60 at costco. If you're running a gel or an agm, I'd get a recomendation from the manufacturer.

    I'm running an optima auto battery for my starting battery, and a costco marine battery for the house battery. I've had two years on them, and will likely replace the house battery before the 2010 season. They've been kept charged up during the winter.

    Electrical systems and batteries are one of the biggest causes of boats being out of commission on the water. Considering how much it costs to run a boat, and how cheap the generic marine batteries are, swapping them out every couple of years is well worth the piece of mind.

  12. #12
    Member Xanfly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    159

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post

    Electrical systems and batteries are one of the biggest causes of boats being out of commission on the water. Considering how much it costs to run a boat, and how cheap the generic marine batteries are, swapping them out every couple of years is well worth the piece of mind.

    Exactly. I love peace of mind on the water.

  13. #13
    Member Alaska Gray's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    4,925

    Default

    Do a search on this. I asked the same question beining of the season this past year. Mine lasted two years due to me leaving out all winter long. This year I have them in the garage and have charged them up once this off season. I will hit them again in the spring before I go out.
    Living the Alaskan Dream
    Gary Keller
    Anchorage, AK

  14. #14

    Default

    I would add one other comment to what has already been said. If you have two batteries on board, stagger the purchasing of new batteries over time. If you buy two batteries the same year, then you potentially run the risk of both batteries dying around the same time. Stagger the pruchasing of replacemetn batteries by a year to avoid this problem.

  15. #15

    Default

    I had some old ones that seemed to need a trickle charge come the weekend, that was the single they were on there way out. I like to get a trip in every other weekend, usually I listen to the stereo during the week while I putter on the boat for a couple hours at a time. This all gives me a good sense as to there remaining life, especially if I can replicate the stereo time in the yard vs the possible time in a cove.

  16. #16

    Default batteries

    I just replace mine every two years for peace of mind. I use the 2 year old batteries in the camper. $150 or so every 2 years is the cheapest expense of owning a boat.

  17. #17

    Default Factors on lasting

    Factors
    Charging; voltage regulator regulates the charge and shuts off @ 13? vdc. Charging both batteries at once means first one to target voltage shuts both of them off, one at a lower vdc. Then sitting there they try to equalize.
    Pulsing Chargers are best they clean plates by on/off/on action.
    Specific Gravity; Hydrometer reading of 1275 is full charge under 1200 is bad
    Voltage; standard fully charged battery is 13+ vdc
    Cleaning; dirt between posts conducts causing a drain, may be a milliamp but its there.
    Storing; Always fully charged. I have a battery maintenance charger on mine on a timer so they get 1amp for 1 hour a day in the boat. All connected together it’s just easier.
    Going to install a Ground Plane for the radio & gps negitives

    Many batteriess are good but this company uses only 100% pure lead, and has way more plates, they are very expensive but you get what you pay for. That saying could not be any more true than with batteries. http://www.odysseybatteries.com/
    No one sells up here, but they are the very top of the line.

  18. #18

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AKExplore View Post
    I would add one other comment to what has already been said. If you have two batteries on board, stagger the purchasing of new batteries over time. If you buy two batteries the same year, then you potentially run the risk of both batteries dying around the same time. Stagger the pruchasing of replacemetn batteries by a year to avoid this problem.
    I've always heard that both batteries should be replaced at the same time. Something about if one battery is losing its charge then it will draw down on the other battery.

    I keep one of those portable jump-start things in my boat. Had to use it once on my boat while it was in my driveway, never had to use it on the water yet, but have let someone else on the water with a dead battery use it.

  19. #19
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,246

    Default

    Alaskapiranha:

    “Going to install a Ground Plane for the radio & gps negitives”

    Why do you think you need a ground plane for your radio antenna and gps negative? The only time a person need to have a ground plane is in a fiberglass boat and using an HF radio (3-30 mhz).

  20. #20

    Default Mega Trons

    Another for the Mega Trons. I had two from the factory and the house battery I added was also an Interstate with the same specs/rating but in a larger black case and not a Mega Tron. Six seasons later, never removed over the winter and the Mega Trons are in excellent shape, fluid full (never had to add any) and passed the sulfated test and just went through 24 hours of hard plowing with elec over hydraulic set up and one showed 80%, the other 90% at the end of the run. The black case unit required topping off with fluid most every season on my older charger and is suffering under load today. One Mega Tron only saw a start load, one saw start load and my Wallas (which is running more often than not) and with the black case the house load. I have been under the understanding that a deep cycle battery treated as a starting battery only, will prematurely kill it but the Mega Trons held up nicely in that regard.

    I have taken many batteries into Battery Specialists and had them de-sulphate, top off with acid and charge batteries for a very reasonable price. If they fail on their load machine than that battery becomes a land based unit and there is no guessing.

    I upgraded to a newer "smart" charger that has setting for the various types of battery construction and has been well worth the 100$. No more boiling off fluids and the batteries condition is much more apparent as well as a very efficient charge cycle paying off in quicker recoveries. Piece of mind when leaving the dock for an extended run.

    I have gotten rid of all my battery isolators and installed these, http://www.yandina.com/NewCatalog.htm, anywhere I want to charge multiple batteries from one source and they have proven to work very well over three years. No matter which motor or charging source I use, all batteries get topped off. West Marine also sells one but more expensive. These also work great to charge a battery mounted forward in the house. Yandina's website has some interesting reading on battery topics as well as others. These are also nice as you do not have to change your existing setup if it is working properly, just daisy chain the batteries together.

    Now who sells Mega Trons in SC AK?????

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •