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Thread: Helpin a older alaskan out

  1. #1
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    Default Helpin a older alaskan out

    he's in his 80's now.. lived here all his life.

    had 2 - 20x20 sheds worth of stuff.. selling his house and moving closer to town into a condo.

    long story short.. we did some construction work for him in the past.. and he needed some work to fix up the old homestead. asked my dad to help... mentioned he has all this 'stuff' to get rid of.

    Dad offered to take it all the garbage plus the good stuff.. he agreed.

    also had some rifles he wanted to get rid of..

    1950 Winchester model 70 in 300 Magnum. 75% condition - never refinished
    Ithaca model 100 12g sxs *never fired* his wife bought it 40ish years ago
    remington 514 SS .22 (child version.. my daughter is 9 and wants to hunt)
    Winchester 94 - .44mag carbine


    bought the lot of them for 1400.00

    The original point-and-click interface was a Smith and Wesson

  2. #2
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Default Wow...

    Lokis,

    I don't know what to say. A man's whole life summed up in less than 200 words... is his wife gone? Can you tell us more about him?

    I think of the time when each one of us has to hang up the guns for good. When it is all passed on to relatives, or sold in some garage sale. A lifetime of memories, of sunrises and sunsets, campfires with good friends, long stalks on game, hard forced marches over rough ground, heavy packs, and trophies won and lost, all represented in a few things we used to carry in the field.

    I know that's the way it is, but it still feels sad.

    Not trying to make you feel bad, it just struck a nerve is all.

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

  3. #3
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    Default

    nope.. both him and his wife are still in great health.

    his children don't hunt, and don't live in Alaska.. he knew my dad and I were avid hunters and wished his guns to goto someone who would appreciate them.

    his wife's dad use the 300 Mag to hunt moose in the 50's... He used it to hunt deer here in SE.

    Dad and I love wood and metalworking.. which comprised the bulk of his collection.. he's tickled pink that someone appreciated his collection... honestly I think he's just happy he found someone who values his tools as...... tools.. and not as antiques.

    Great people..... he's really happy that we appreciate not only the tools, but the history behind them.

    (he made himself a wooden skiff from logs.. we now have the tools he used.. how cool is that?)

    ... the friends you make up here....
    The original point-and-click interface was a Smith and Wesson

  4. #4
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lokis View Post
    nope.. both him and his wife are still in great health.

    his children don't hunt, and don't live in Alaska.. he knew my dad and I were avid hunters and wished his guns to goto someone who would appreciate them.

    his wife's dad use the 300 Mag to hunt moose in the 50's... He used it to hunt deer here in SE.

    Dad and I love wood and metalworking.. which comprised the bulk of his collection.. he's tickled pink that someone appreciated his collection... honestly I think he's just happy he found someone who values his tools as...... tools.. and not as antiques.

    Great people..... he's really happy that we appreciate not only the tools, but the history behind them.

    (he made himself a wooden skiff from logs.. we now have the tools he used.. how cool is that?)

    ... the friends you make up here....
    Thanks for the update! He sounds like a good man to have known. I'd sure rather have my stuff going to someone I know than a total stranger.

    Take care-

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Strahan View Post
    Thanks for the update! He sounds like a good man to have known. I'd sure rather have my stuff going to someone I know than a total stranger.

    Take care-

    -Mike
    indeed.. we offered to pay him for his 'good' stuff... he wouldn't hear of it. he had no way of hauling off the garbage (2 full flatbeds of just junk).

    to be honest.. he had a bunch of junk (this coming from my dad who has a 100' x 40' shed full of 'stuff')

    alot of sub 5"x2"x1/2" rips of plywood.. etc... wood paneling from the 50's.. etc...


    The original point-and-click interface was a Smith and Wesson

  6. #6
    Member Phil's Avatar
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    Default Mike

    I had the same feeling when I first read the post. My day is coming & probably sooner than yours (I'm 74). When the hunts are all over, I will be selling most of my equipment. Not that the family doesn't hunt but I'm left eye dominant and everyone else shoots right handed.

    In some fashion it does seem sad that we end our days a shadow of what we were. I see a lot of pictures of hunters on this forum and very few have much grey in their beards. I hope they can appreciate what you & I are feeling.

    Still a great post and I have had a few "old" friends whose companionship I value more than anything I can think of (except my wife).

  7. #7
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Default Thanks!

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil View Post
    I had the same feeling when I first read the post. My day is coming & probably sooner than yours (I'm 74). When the hunts are all over, I will be selling most of my equipment. Not that the family doesn't hunt but I'm left eye dominant and everyone else shoots right handed.

    In some fashion it does seem sad that we end our days a shadow of what we were. I see a lot of pictures of hunters on this forum and very few have much grey in their beards. I hope they can appreciate what you & I are feeling.

    Still a great post and I have had a few "old" friends whose companionship I value more than anything I can think of (except my wife).
    Phil,

    My father is in his 70's and his days in the field are pretty much over. Now when he takes the dogs out for a run, he's riding an ATV. He now does most of his hunting vicariously through the TV. He just can't get around like he could. I see his frustration; as a young marine he could walk just about anyone into the ground. But he had quadruple bypass surgery before he turned fifty and he was never the same after that. I have had the privilege of making many hunts with him here in Alaska, and he relives those hunts still.

    Perhaps the memories are the thing that feeds the need to hunt when hunting is no longer possible for him. I guess that's one of the reasons I stress the other aspects of hunting so much here in the forums. To my way of thinking if I can enjoy most other aspects of a hunt (besides just the kiill), I will have many more memories to enjoy later.

    I was encouraged to see that Lokis has known this gentleman for many years. I could see doing something like that when the time comes.

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

  8. #8
    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    Default

    At 60 I have decided a young man thats an Air Force lifer will be takeing my hunting gear.Have two kids and 10 grandkids but never see them.This young man lives to hunt and hunts what ever country he is in and still visits me a lot.I'm a die hard Marine and know the Corps blew it when they let this fine man get away.

  9. #9

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    They say that he who has the most toys wins.

    However, when I hunt I try to enjoy every aspect of the hunt to the maximum, because I know that when my hunting days are over and as I sit in a retirement home, I know that:

    He that has the most good hunting memories smiles the longest.

  10. #10
    Member markopolo50's Avatar
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    Default Hunt memories, on disc

    Quote Originally Posted by BEARBOB View Post
    They say that he who has the most toys wins.

    However, when I hunt I try to enjoy every aspect of the hunt to the maximum, because I know that when my hunting days are over and as I sit in a retirement home, I know that:

    He that has the most good hunting memories smiles the longest.

    Bob, Mike

    Don't know how I thought of this but about 20 years ago I started writing all of my hunting stories down. It took me a while to remember the early successful, mostly deer hunts but I managed to get them on paper. Over the years I have kept writing them and now have them all typed and on a disc. I relive every one of them each time I read them. In fact I just printed 2 and sent them to buddies that shared the hunts. One was in 1997(elk) and one in 1977(deer). I only have 39 stories but I am glad they are recorded. I lost my dad 3 years ago and though he always heard my stories I never got them to him to read. Enjoy your family and keep hunting with them.

    Mark

  11. #11
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Default Note to Mark

    Quote Originally Posted by markopolo50 View Post
    Bob, Mike

    Don't know how I thought of this but about 20 years ago I started writing all of my hunting stories down. It took me a while to remember the early successful, mostly deer hunts but I managed to get them on paper. Over the years I have kept writing them and now have them all typed and on a disc. I relive every one of them each time I read them. In fact I just printed 2 and sent them to buddies that shared the hunts. One was in 1997(elk) and one in 1977(deer). I only have 39 stories but I am glad they are recorded. I lost my dad 3 years ago and though he always heard my stories I never got them to him to read. Enjoy your family and keep hunting with them.

    Mark
    Mark,

    I don't want to wander too far off topic here, but if you ever want to get those stories published, give me a shout and I might be able to help make that happen.

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

  12. #12
    Member markopolo50's Avatar
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    Default

    Mike, sent you a PM, thanks, Mark

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil View Post
    I see a lot of pictures of hunters on this forum and very few have much grey in their beards
    Grecian formula & Just For Men!!

  14. #14
    Member Trapak's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Pay It Forward!

    You guys are getting pretty sentimental... and I'm enjoying it. I've kept a daily journal for 23 yrs. and I love most to review my hunts and other outdoor adventures in Alaska! I'm pushing 50 and I've long planned on leaving a firearm for my hunting buddies and other friends when I go. The rest will go to my sons. I was blessed in the past with a dear friend who gave me several firearms when he could no longer guide or hunt. He didn't have any children and wanted it to go to someone who would use them, and not sit in a safe. I haven't let him down, and hope to "Pay It Forward" by giving some things away when I no longer use them.

  15. #15
    Member Phil's Avatar
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    Default Cool Posts

    I've enjoyed reading the responses and, YES, I know some of us are getting somewhat sentimental. Loved the "Grecian formula" comment.

    I too have been keeping a record of some of my hunting trips - they help me keep my memory straight - it tends to wander toward the "impossibly good" side.

    I also have a friend who writes for Hawkeye Magazine (New Hampshire hunting/fishing. He keeps saying that he wants to have a buddy reload some shotgun shells with his remains (after cremation) and take him hunting "one more time". To me - that's funny.

  16. #16
    Member pinehavensredrocket's Avatar
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    most of us on the high side of 50 still think like younger men....and enjoy the hunt as before. endurance (for me) is the issue, as i can't recover as fast as before. long hunts wear me down, but haven't stopped me, as yet.

    life is a process....and we change through time. some of those things that used to be important, now aren't "quite so much". the act of doing is to me the issue, more than solely the result. i am writing this after filling 4 tags this year.

    with friends in their middle 70's still enjoying the hunt, "here's to the good life"!

    happy trails.
    jh

  17. #17
    Member fishnngrinn's Avatar
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    Default

    Thanks for sharing, gentlmen. The older we get, the more in tune with our mortality we become and the more we think about what we will leave behind: memories as well as tools. At 67 I am pleased to still enjoy the hunt, but as has been noted, endurance is limited. November 2008 I went to Montana to hunt deer with my two sons and I took two custom rifles to leave with them. I know they appreciate them, I could see it. I am going to take advice given here to write down the memories, I know they will be appreciated long after I am gone.
    NRA Lifetime Member

  18. #18
    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    Default I'm waiting

    I'm a young man and my finest firearm was gifted me by my Grandfather....It was his first.
    Remington 721 300 H&H

    I've refinished the stock and cleaned her to perfection. I feed her and exercise her.

    She is welcomed in the house and sleeps near the bed.

    The best thing you can do for that ol' boy is sit down and listen to his stories. He might not be a writer. Some still carry a strong oral tradition.

    Congrats on your new firearms.....sounds like you'll treat em well.

  19. #19
    Member 1stimestar's Avatar
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    You guys are really making me want to call and talk to my dad. But I just looked at the time here and it would be midnight "there". I'm calling him in the morning though.
    Alaska, the Madness; Bloggity Stories of the North
    http://cloud9doula.wordpress.com/

    Does this shotgun make my butt look big?

  20. #20
    Member Roland on the River's Avatar
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    Default Merry Christmas to all

    Yes, not only at this time of year but stay in touch with family and friends. Time goes by too quickly and before you say "shou'da, could'a, would'a just do it.

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