Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 43

Thread: Best rod for Sept Kenai bows?

  1. #1

    Default Best rod for Sept Kenai bows?

    I will be coming up next Sept (finally) to fish the Kenai for bows and dollies and will be using beads and maybe flesh flies under an indicator. My simple question is if you were to buy a rod to use only for this purpose what would it be? Let's assume santa will be good to me this year but also keep it realistic (under $300). Thanks for your relpy in advance guys!

  2. #2
    Member alaskachuck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    3,256

    Default

    Hey bud. I live a 5wt but 1st timers i suggest 7wt. 8'6 to 9' There are so many brands. I like Orvis, G loomis, TFO St Croix. You will get tons of suggestions here just take your time and sort through them
    Grandkids, Making big tough guys hearts melt at first sight

  3. #3
    Member danattherock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    5,608

    Default

    I would take a 7 wt. If fishing out of a drift boat, many claim that the longer 9.5' and 10' rods are of benefit. I am a huge fan of Scott rods. The E2, S3, and S3s are top notch. I also got a Scott A2 for a back up rod on a recent float trip. Even though I own some more expensive rods, one of my all time favorites is a Scott E2. Great action. Nice rods and lifetime warranty with incredible customer service.
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  4. #4
    Member jakec5253's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    381

    Default Sage FLI

    I agree with Dan on the 9.5 or 10ft rods. I like them better for bank fishing too, not just from the boat. I find it a whole lot easier to mend, and to roll cast with that extra foot of rod. Alaska Flyfishing Goods is having a killer sell on the Sage FLI, which have been replaced with the Flight for this year. He has a 10ft 7wt for $195. Brad is a great guy to deal with. I have ordered from him a few times, and was very impressed every time. It is great to support a local Alaskan owned shop too.

    http://www.alaskaflyfishinggoods.com...uct-flyer.html


    Jake

  5. #5
    Member danattherock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    5,608

    Default

    I could not agree more about Alaska Flyfishing Goods. Found them a few months ago when I was looking for some good esl for a NW float trip. Best dolly flies ever. After my trip, I ordered 6 dozen more. Best esl I have ever seen. Brad is a super nice guy and I will be making more orders from them. Looks like a good deal on the rod.

    http://www.alaskaflyfishinggoods.com/

    http://www.alaskaflyfishinggoods.com...uct-flyer.html
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,293

    Default

    I think Lamiglas G1000 rods are a great value for an under $200.00 fly rod. When I break my 8wt Sage I go to my trusty G1000. It's caught a lot of fish and has never failed.

    If I was looking to come to the Kenai in September for rainbows I'd be prepared to sort through salmon trying to get to them. A 7 or 8wt would be my choice. But if I was coming to the Kenai for rainbows, I'd wait for October.

    If fishing from a boat I'd ask whether above Skilak or below. Either way I'd bring a spinning rod or baitcaster for drifting. More so for below Skilak. I may not be a feather chucker but beads ain't feathers, and I still measure a day's fishing by fish caught. How isn't as important as how many.

    Be prepared for beads AND flesh. I'd bet on beads in Sept moving to flesh as it gets into Oct. That all depends on salmon returns and river conditions. A small variation in color and size of bead makes a huge difference. I mean variations you'll barely be able to recognize. Rainbows are finicky. Be prepared.

    My best advice? Hire a guide for the first day or two. You'll get some very valuable schooling from somebody who spends every day on the river.

  7. #7

    Default

    Thanks or the replies so far guys. I am looking at the Sage FL series that is being discontinued - hoping to find a deal. I will have to look at the lamiglass rods as well. Any other sugestions?

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    soldotna
    Posts
    527

    Default TFO

    Definitely go with a 7 weight. A 5 weight doesn't handle the indicator, beads, split shots, wind, etc.. well at all. A 6 is good under most conditions, but a 7 weight will help you cut through the wind much better.

    TFO (Temple Fork Outfitters) makes the best rods for the money in my opinion... they are very fast rods, which is what you want in order to cast lots of weight, they're light, have a great warranty, and are relatively cheap for what you get. The pro series is the beginner/intermediate rod, but the TiCR is a beautiful rod that casts extremely well under the conditions you will be facing, and I believe it retails around or under $300. That's what I'd get if I were you.
    www.akfishology.com

    fishing isn't about life or death... it's more important than that.

  9. #9

    Default

    I would say try out those rods before you by them, here's my take:

    a) Sage Fli - No. I do not like these rods, the way they cast, mend, anything about them. I would not take one for free.

    b) TFO - TiCr - No. Some people really like this, but not me, and I honestly don't know why anyone else does either. I do not like the way this rod casts, way too fast, like casting with a broomstick. Just plain aweful. Can't stand it, not only would I not take it for free, you couldn't pay me to fish with it.

    Nevertheless, this rod does seem to be popular with people who toss clousers on full-sink lines and need alot of backbone for going after big stripers, which is done alot around me but I don't do myself; so maybe it works well overlined or something. The other issue I've heard commonly with this is tip-breakage from being whacked by the fly, which I think has to do with the brittleness of the blank. It is very stiff. ~$180 or so.

    c) TFO - Pro - maybe. I have several of these rods. They cast OK, but they are no where near top-end Sage or Scott either. Taper a little too progressive, but not bad. The materials are simple, low end stuff, but not rock bottom garbage. Unfinished gray blank. Large stripping guide (similar to saltwater lines in other models). Whacked the tip of these with lead-heads many times and have not broken one that way. Have had warranty service due to a guide coming out, and cork handle coming loose. Very cheap, low quality cork, imo. But what the heck. It's $150 bucks.

    d) 7 wt, larger if combined use for silvers. But that's mainly due to rainbow size....not bead/lead chucking ability.

    e) 9 or 9.5 ft, but not 10 ft. Try the longer rods out first, before buying/deciding.

  10. #10
    Member alaskachuck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    3,256

    Default

    Is the one in your hand when you catch the Hogzilla

    Ok I have been using a 7wt for 4 years and went to my 5 this year,. I have no issues with the wind but im sure that experience has alot to do with that. My wife went to a 5 this year also after 4 years on the 7wt. It took a bit of learning again going to a lighter rod but wow. The one big difference is on the drift. Man turning a nice hog is a bit more of a challenge. We lost more fish this year due to scaling down but we have enjoyed every moment of it. The challenge is still there that is for sure. Lost one bow this year that all 4 guys with me saw and we know it was over 30. One dolly in the same spot 3 weeks later that would have cleared 30. Would I have landed them on a 7wt. i doubt it. I did it all right and go schooled.. Barbless hooks. A flip and a spin and bye bye. They dont get that big cuz they are stupid. For a 1st timer a 7wt is a great all around rod and that is what most guides hook up their clients with. I had a first timer up here this year and he fished with me for 7 days. 7wt for 4 or 5 days then he scaled down. Brands are all about your own choice too. I dont fish Sage. I have 1 loomis, 1 orvis, 2 TFO's and 2 St croix's, 2 pfluggers, and 2 that i have no idea what brands they are. i have caught big fish on all them. Does the rod make a difference. Somewhat. When floating a bead with and bobbicator i tend to make sure my line it top quality floating line to give it the natural drift. The fish does not know the rod. If i streaming coneheads through deep drifts and holes with out an indicator the rod will make a difference. I am fishing by feel and not sight then. I usually put my first time friends on a 7 wt St croix or pflugger or TFO. 8'5 to 9'0 with a bead since there are here the 2nd and 3rd week of august. Sight indicator too and they have all gone home with great memories. Then again that is just my .02 worth
    Grandkids, Making big tough guys hearts melt at first sight

  11. #11
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Eagle River/ Juneau
    Posts
    5,154

    Default

    I'd go for a 7 if you hook a 30" bow you'll be glad you are using it... I fish a 5 most of the time though.

    I totally dig tfo rods the professional is my favorite
    You might look at Echo they have a really good reputation

    I think next year (next week maybe) I'll be fishing my 5 wt switch...
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  12. #12

    Default

    So, now I am pretty confused. Some are saying the FLI Sage is not a good call but for 175 bucks would that help make it the right call? It is being closed out and I can get it for around that amount. Is there a better rod out there for that money? I really appreciate your insight here guys. Thanks for all the replies!

  13. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,293

    Default

    Everybody's got an opinion. I like my FLi series 6wt enough that I just ordered TWO 10wts for an anniversary trip I'm taking my wife on next summer. That some other guys don't prefer them is no big deal to me. I have expensive Sage rods, too, and still think the FLi is pretty sweet for the price. Some bargains are worth taking advantage of.

  14. #14
    Member jakec5253's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    381

    Default action

    The FLI rods from Sage are great rods. If they weren't, I don't think Sage would put their name on them. I think some people don't like it because it is a fast action rod. Stevesch said that he didn't like the FLI or the TICR, both are fast action rods. He may prefer a little slower action. I have both of these, the FLI in a 6wt, and the TICR in an 8wt, and I have been very happy with both. He, and a few others suggested the professional series from TFO, which is a medium fast action, and is a little slower than the other two. I have a 9ft 5wt professional, and I like it as well, I just have to remember to slow down my casting stroke a little when I fish it.
    You need to decide which action best fits your casting style, then try out a few rods in that category. Almost all manufacturers make many different actions, and there are also a quite a few that make both top of the line, and entry level, lower priced rods. There are always going to be people who don't like certain rods, just like there are people who don't like certain guns, trucks, etc. I fish mostly Sage rods, and my fishing partner fishes Winston rods. It is all what fits you best. Do a little research, test out some rods, and get what YOU like best. This website is an awesome source of information, but sometimes it seems people are way to eager to push their opinion on you, and if you don't agree, then you don't know what you are talking about. Luckily, there are many, many more who just want to help people out.

    Jake
    Last edited by jakec5253; 12-10-2008 at 19:47. Reason: to clarify

  15. #15
    Member danattherock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    5,608

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by chitownflyfisher View Post
    So, now I am pretty confused. !

    You are supposed to be. I mean this kindly, but you are taking opinions from different people on a very personal choice. I get it. I have been there. But thought it is worth mentioning that we all have different preferences. There is no right or wrong rod. Depends on the person and their preferences. If you asked me, I would say get a Scott E2. Best fly rod I have ever cast for the money. The Scott S3 and S3s is a little better, but at a much higher price. Many prefer using a 9.5' to 10' rod out of a driftboat. But my only experience was on a SW Alaska float trip in an Ally pack canoe. Mostly fishing from the shore. I could not quite get my timing right with the Scott A2 10' 7 wt. Preferred the Scott E2 9' 6 wt for most of that trip. Some like a fast rod (like me), some like medium fast, or medium. Different strokes for different folks. Stevesch makes a great suggestion about trying out a rod first. If you are like me, you will buy a few rods before you find what you prefer. Not unusual I don't think. My suggestion is not to spend too much money on the first rod or two you buy. Find out what you like and dislike. Then upgrade to something better and use the other rod as a back up. If you fly fish much, you will eventually need the back up rod
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  16. #16
    Member danattherock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    5,608

    Default Found something ...

    Found a rod on Sierra Trading Post you should look at. My buddy took one of these on the Goodnews float in '07. He had got it for $99 and I cast it some and was VERY impressed. I had an assortment of Scott rods and just cast the thing to get him to shut up. He was right, this rod was awesome. Very nice rod, don't let the price fool you. Nice fast action, well built, and good fit and finish. It is currently $72!! This is a no brainer if you ask me. I would encourage you to take a look at the rod. At this price, I would look at getting two. Perhaps a 5 wt and a 7 wt. Or a 4 wt and a 6 wt. A 4 wt and an 8 wt. Whatever. At this price, you can't go wrong. Below is a link.

    http://www.sierratradingpost.com/p/0...d-4-Piece.html
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  17. #17
    Member danattherock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    5,608
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  18. #18
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,293

    Default

    Chitown guy,

    Something to calm your nerves. Fly rods are like skis. If you take a few runs on unfamiliar boards you'll quickly adapt to them. A few more runs and you'll learn to like them. Switch to something different....start the process all over again. With respect to fly rods? You won't make a wrong decision. At least not wrong enough to impact your trip. Relax and pick a rod. You'll have a ball.

    Then you can start thinking about classic reels versus large arbor. And start the decision process all over again!

  19. #19
    Member alaskachuck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    3,256

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Pid View Post
    Chitown guy,

    Something to calm your nerves. Fly rods are like skis. If you take a few runs on unfamiliar boards you'll quickly adapt to them. A few more runs and you'll learn to like them. Switch to something different....start the process all over again. With respect to fly rods? You won't make a wrong decision. At least not wrong enough to impact your trip. Relax and pick a rod. You'll have a ball.

    Then you can start thinking about classic reels versus large arbor. And start the decision process all over again!

    Kind of like women. No two are the same. They all have thier own qualities.

    Pid you nailed it. good post
    Grandkids, Making big tough guys hearts melt at first sight

  20. #20

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by chitownflyfisher View Post
    So, now I am pretty confused. Some are saying the FLI Sage is not a good call but for 175 bucks would that help make it the right call? It is being closed out and I can get it for around that amount. Is there a better rod out there for that money? I really appreciate your insight here guys. Thanks for all the replies!
    1. Fli? Just say no. Sage makes many great rods, but this is not one of them.

    2. Better rod than Fli? The TFO's are much better in that price range, which is not saying much, but you asked.

    3. Echo is just as bad, if not worse, than fli, so don't go there either.

    4. Go cast some rods before buying one.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •