Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 22

Thread: Cooking your game meat...

  1. #1
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Marshall
    Posts
    1,975

    Default Cooking your game meat...

    With the exception of bear meat, I find that cooking moose, goat, caribou, etc, etc, are usually over done, dry & nasty!!!!

    I've found that if you cook meat to a nice & juicy med rare that you get a better fare than the over cooked carboard textured nasty dry need to drink water with every bite meat...

  2. #2

    Smile Moose

    I lived in moose country, and we ate moose and deer every winter. I always heard that health wise cook it untill no red.
    One good way was to chicken fry it. Barbecue is king. Roasts are a tough way to go. Boil the ribs untill tender and then barbecue.
    If I'm wrong,will not be the last time. What do you other people think?
    Riverlover.

  3. #3

    Default

    Being a culinary student at the moment, I love these kinds of things.

    You are completely fine in cooking red meat only to a rare/medium rare doneness, simply an issue of preference. That being said, IMO all meat tastes better at a medium rare to medium stage. Yes, even pork and chicken however, I don't think it prudent to do so with poultry. The issue of trichinosis with domestic pork has for all intents and purposes been eliminated, so a medium rare pork chop is top notch in my book.

    If you don't want to "undercook" your meat and you like a well doneness, use a marinade with some sort of acid ie vinegar, alcohol, lemon juice. It will help to keep it tender and juicy regardless. Now when you combine a marinade and medium rare....perfection.

  4. #4
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    5,231

    Default

    I butcher my own moose, sheep, caribou, etc and cut the steaks about 3/4 to 1 inch thick. I throw em on the bbq to med rare. mmmmm good. Been doin it this way for 15 years I've been in Alaska. If you cut the steaks too thin it's hard to NOT over cook them. I grind the burger with no added fat and cook em on the grill the same way. Maybe mix in some chopped onion, garlic and a touch of bbq sauce sometimes. Not too much. Don't like to kill the flavor if the meat with bbq sauce. Rule #1- don't over cook!
    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and donít have one, youíll probably never need one again

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Maryland, wishing it was AK
    Posts
    56

    Default

    Here is an easy one

    1.cut up bou, moose,sheep deer ext ext. steaks into about 1 inch cubes. marinade in Itailian (sp) dressing for a few hours in the fridge.

    2. cut peices of bacon in half so you have the same amount of bacon as cubes.

    3. Wrap the bacon around the meat cubes and secure with tooth pick.

    4 put them on the grill for about 5 minutes or until the bacon just starts to get crispy on the edges. (that is how I cook mine so the venison is not over cooked. I just through the bacon to the dog). cook yours however you like.

    now eat...makes me hungry thinking about it.

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Big Lake
    Posts
    1,424

    Default under cooked meat

    saw this quote somewhere:"The only reason to apologize for serving meat to a guest is if it is overcooked."
    rare to medimum rare is the only way to go.
    Gary

  7. #7

    Default Good way

    Fisherman thats the same way i do goose and duck but don't throw that bacon to the dogs!! Mark T

  8. #8
    Member 8x57 Mauser's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Southeast Alaska
    Posts
    512

    Thumbs up Pink in the middle

    I used a fabulous recipe that was made for pork tenderloins on some of my venison this week. Perfect for any cylindrical cut of meat (tenderloins, backstraps...):

    Trim it carefully, cut it 1.5 inches thick, and tie a wrap of twine around each cylinder (so it doesn't fall over as you sear it). Get your pan and a drizzle of oil up to medium-high heat and sear the steaks 3 minutes per side.

    Put 'em on a platter to rest for 10 or 15 minutes while you make a sauce in the pan, snip those strings and serve. You get a good, flavorful sear on both sides, and the meat is still juicy and pink in the center. It's a little piece of perfect.

  9. #9
    Member FishingBum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    North Pole
    Posts
    78

    Default Cooking Game Meat

    What I have found with game meat is to slow cook it. If you slow cook those stakes on the grill and keep the marinated they will not be dry & nasty.

    When cooking my ground on the stove I still use a low heat and a little olive oil. Comes out better than any cut of beef I have ever had.

  10. #10
    Moderator AKmud's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Wasilla, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    3,163

    Question smoking?

    Has anyone ever tried smoking a moose tenderloin or brisket? I have a "hydro-smoker" which is a simple electric smoker that uses a pan of water in the bottom. I am curious if moose will smoke up all right, or if it will just dry it up. I love doing pork tenderloins and beef brisket, but the fat content in moose is considerably different. I don't want to waste a perfectly good chunk of moose if it won't work.

    Any suggestions?
    AKmud
    http://i78.photobucket.com/albums/j96/AKmud/213700RMK1-1.jpg


    The porcupine is a peacful animal yet God still thought it necessary to give him quills....

  11. #11
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Marshall
    Posts
    1,975

    Default Never boil meat...

    Is my mantra, with that said, many a people always here in the village eat moose soup/dry roast for the entire year they have moose meat. I will never boil my steaks/ribs as it leeches out the flavor of the meat. I just cooked me a nice tenderloin last night that sat marinated in LP Sauce for 1 day on my kitchen floor, & it was cooked on med-hi heat with a lil bit of butter for 4 mins a side & sat for 5 mins afterwards & it was the best tasting moose meat I've ever had...it didn't even taste like the strong gamey moose... that I've had @ other peoples houses...MMMMMM Getting hungry just thinking about it...

  12. #12
    Member fullkurl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Alaska/Idaho
    Posts
    2,155

    Default Crockpot...

    The best way for "fall off the fork" game meat is marinade or bbq sauce and a crockpot. Load it first thing in the morning before work, put it on low, and then come home and dine like a king MMMMMMM.

  13. #13

    Default What is with all of this BBQ sauce?

    It just hides all of the meat flavor. A nice rub of garlic, olive oil, kosher salt, and rosemary for roasts is great. Cook them on low heat covered with foil and they will be tender and juicy.

  14. #14

    Default

    I soak nice lean cuts usually off the hind quarter with no tendons in a brine of salt, brown sugar and tetender quick meatr tenderizer for a couple weeks in the frig anf then smoke it. When I serve it up I use a slicer and slice it 1/8 inch thick. It is similar to the deired beef you can get in stores in the little jars. I grew up doing it to venison and called it deer candy.

  15. #15
    New member reuben_j_cogburn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    285

    Default Yup!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by fullkurl View Post
    The best way for "fall off the fork" game meat is marinade or bbq sauce and a crockpot. Load it first thing in the morning before work, put it on low, and then come home and dine like a king MMMMMMM.
    Much of my meat is crock potted! Chili's, soups, stews, BBQ..............

    I just crock potted a mallard last week and it was awesome........

    Not to mention it's very fool proof! Just not very fast!


    reuben......

  16. #16
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Coffman Cove, POW, Alaska
    Posts
    745

    Default Culinary Perfection

    Here is one for the sophisticated folks (not really, I am as redneck as it gets):

    Take a backstrap or tenderloin of any animal. Mix crumbled bleu cheese, chives, and cooked-crumbled bacon together. Put a slit in the meat and stuff with the mixture and toothpick closed. Put salt, pepper, and garlic on the top and bake for 45 minutes. Deluxe...

  17. #17
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    143

    Default Bacon and BBQ Sauce?????????

    If I wanted to eat bacon, I'd do it in the morning with eggs and toast. Wrapping game meat in bacon is to my thinking hiding something you don't want to experience - the actual flavor of the meat! I see spices and marinades as enhancements. But using bacon and BBQ sauce is trying to make the wild meat something it is not!
    To each his own.

  18. #18

    Default cooking meat

    As my name dictates i cook for a living. I work at a large hotel and we cook plenty of farm raised game. When i cook game i try to enhance the flavors and not hide them. I like to use items that the animals eat apples, cranberries, blueberries, juniper berries, rose hips, and spruce tips. All of these items are very light in flavor and used to enhance the natural flavor of the game. As far as the cooking technique it depends on the cut of meat. If it is back strap tenderloin or the hind quarter then a quick saute will be fine. If it is brisket, flank steak, shank meat or neck meat then a longer slower cooking is needed. Sweet apple smoking also tenders meat and adds flavor. Also think of what you serve with the game. A piece of back strap with just salt and pepper might be great if you have a side of cranberry wild rice, rose hip jam, and caramalized red onions. It is all about the balance. When you taste a producct nothing should stand out, you should have to think what is that flavor? So i guess the answer is everyone is right and as long as you properly care for the meat it is up to you on how to cook it. That is what makes cooking so much fun and such a pain as the only wrong way to cook is cooking what your guests do not like. Start with the basics. A clean well cared for piece of meat, a hot pan, and then start building. We chefs just like you to think cooking is so hard in reality it is all about care and balance. Have fun and enjoy. Chef Viktor

  19. #19
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    326

    Default

    Frozen moose roast, throw it in the crockpot, add 1 package lipton onion soup mix, 1 cup water. put it on low. good to eat when you get home from work.

  20. #20
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Sitka, AK
    Posts
    142

    Default

    I love to grill meat... and I never, ever, ever cook it until there is no more red. Medium is about the most cooked it gets (except bear). Actually, my wife won't eat it unless it still has somewhat of a pulse...hehehe. One of my favorites is cutting cubes of deer meat, wrapping it in bacon, and marinating it in a little olive oil, soy sauce, and Montreal steak seasoning. It's got to be the best thing I've ever eaten... and no, the dog doesn't get the bacon. Call it masking the flavor if you have to, but you haven't lived until you try it. Throwing a slice of jalepeno on the toothpick is plus too! Grill time!

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •