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Thread: Is This Old Ruger 7RM Worth a Custom Build?

  1. #1

    Default Is This Old Ruger 7RM Worth a Custom Build?

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    It was made in either 74 or 75 and seems to me to be in fairly good shape for a rifle of that era. It was my first rifle and I bought it 4 years ago for $375 with a cheap redfield scope. It has been on 3 moose hunts and has taken 1 small bull with a 160 TSX.

    As is it shoots 1'- 1 1/2" groups at 100 yds with handloads. I would like to make this gun a tack driver if at all possible. As far as I know it is 100% stock and the only thing I have done to it is refinish the stock. The trigger sucks but is fully adjustable. Since the gun was a mid 70's model I assume the barrel is a Wilson and not a Douglas. It does not have the integral ring mounts as you casn see in the picture. Would it be worth dumping a few hundred bucks into? Would It get much more accurate with a glass bed job, free float and trigger tuning? Would else could be done to acheive better accuracy?

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  2. #2
    Member e45colt's Avatar
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    Default More than a couple of hundred

    I sent my newer (three position safety) Ruger 30-06 to Kodiak Precision in Arizona (of all places) and had him make it a .338-06. He squared and trued the action, put a Lilja barrel, tuned the tigger, target crown etc. and everything is top-notch. I was quoted 8 months and barely got it before a week long caribou hunt a year later.
    It was worth the wait and $$$$. All I can say is it outshoots my ablilities. I have been able to make shots with this rifle that I cannot make otherwise. I ordered the standard model but the price goes up from there. I would say the standard is fine for us mere mortals. Don is a benchrest champion so what what I consider to be stellar hunting accuraccy he thinks is unacceptable.

    Spendy-Long wait but Well worth it IMHO.

    Ed

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    Default

    First I would let the best shooter you know try it. It may already be a tack driver and for me 1" is more the good enough for a hunting gun.You have a good looking gun and I realy like the plum color old Rugers get.

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    Member Alangaq's Avatar
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    Default

    If it was mine I would first inspect the crown with a 10x magnifying glass and polish out any defects with lapping compound and a small ball bearing if needed. Then I would free float the barrel by removing less than about a 1/16” of stock material the entire length of the barrel channel save or about 2” in front of the recoil lug. Go shoot it and see how it does.

    This will give you some idea whether or not you will need to invest more cash into things like action blueprinting, new barrel etc. For this “quick and dirty” test, don’t worry about re-finishing that barrel channel in the stock or bedding the action. Neither will mater at all for this test. Action bedding (unless of course your action is loose in the stock) really only benefits you over longer periods of time, where changes in temperature, humidity etc. will have an effect on the dimensions of the stock and may potentially change your point of impact. It does not make your rifle more accurate in so far as group size is concerned, but rather, more consistent and predictable in group placement or point of impact. (note that the preceding statements are my opinion, and may not be universally excepted by others on this forum).

    If all goes well, and your groups shrink noticeably, then you will want to proceed with bedding the action and refinishing the portions of the stock relieved in the free floating process.

    If it shoots worse, and you don’t really want to spend any more time or money on it, then you have one of those rifles that likes a little bit of pressure on the barrel and you can then revisit this forum or others to obtain instructions for installing some sort of barrel tension device at the end of the stock in the barrel channel to accommodate that, and bring it back to its original accuracy potential, or perhaps slightly better.

    If it shoots the same and your ready to deal out some cash, Well then it might be time to think about a new barrel, trigger job, blueprinting the action etc. Once that work has been done, then you would go ahead and bed the action and refinish the barrel channel to match the contour of the new barrel.

    Best of luck
    “You’ve gotten soft. You’re like one of those police dogs who’s released in to the wild and gets eaten by a deer or something.” Bill McNeal of News Radio

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    Member Alangaq's Avatar
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    One more thing, and before we get ahead of ourselves, you should clean the barrel. I mean really clean it out and make sure you are not dealing with a build up of copper that could have an appreciable effect your accuracy potential.

    After you are sure that it is totally clean, swab it down good with hoppies #9 and let it sit overnight. If you push a patch thru it the next day and get any green color at all, then it still has copper imbedded in the rifling and more cleaning is warranted. If not, then go do some shooting.
    “You’ve gotten soft. You’re like one of those police dogs who’s released in to the wild and gets eaten by a deer or something.” Bill McNeal of News Radio

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    Quote Originally Posted by senecanation View Post
    http://picasaweb.google.com/cseneca/Desktop#

    It was made in either 74 or 75 and seems to me to be in fairly good shape for a rifle of that era.

    As is it shoots 1'- 1 1/2" groups at 100 yds with handloads.
    My guess it was manufactured in late '74. I own a 30-06 from the same time frame. I still use mine to hunt with and it still shoots good. So I also suggest a good cleaning to remove any debris.

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    Default Ain't bad

    The difference you're looking for could be had for free . Look at bullet seating depth , guard screw tightness and the way you're shooting off a bench . Somebody else picking it up might make a difference , what's wrong with 1-1 1/2" groups anyway ?

  8. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Alangaq View Post
    If it was mine I would first inspect the crown with a 10x magnifying glass and polish out any defects with lapping compound and a small ball bearing if needed. Then I would free float the barrel by removing less than about a 1/16” of stock material the entire length of the barrel channel save or about 2” in front of the recoil lug. Go shoot it and see how it does.

    This will give you some idea whether or not you will need to invest more cash into things like action blueprinting, new barrel etc. For this “quick and dirty” test, don’t worry about re-finishing that barrel channel in the stock or bedding the action. Neither will mater at all for this test. Action bedding (unless of course your action is loose in the stock) really only benefits you over longer periods of time, where changes in temperature, humidity etc. will have an effect on the dimensions of the stock and may potentially change your point of impact. It does not make your rifle more accurate in so far as group size is concerned, but rather, more consistent and predictable in group placement or point of impact. (note that the preceding statements are my opinion, and may not be universally excepted by others on this forum).

    If all goes well, and your groups shrink noticeably, then you will want to proceed with bedding the action and refinishing the portions of the stock relieved in the free floating process.

    If it shoots worse, and you don’t really want to spend any more time or money on it, then you have one of those rifles that likes a little bit of pressure on the barrel and you can then revisit this forum or others to obtain instructions for installing some sort of barrel tension device at the end of the stock in the barrel channel to accommodate that, and bring it back to its original accuracy potential, or perhaps slightly better.

    If it shoots the same and your ready to deal out some cash, Well then it might be time to think about a new barrel, trigger job, blueprinting the action etc. Once that work has been done, then you would go ahead and bed the action and refinish the barrel channel to match the contour of the new barrel.

    Best of luck

    It sounds like this could get quite expensive. Has anyone ever a dressed up an old m77 like that before? What were the results?

    Is free floating a job that a newbie could handle, I have absolutely no gunsmithing experience but am a pretty good carpenter and work well with my hands. Do I need a special tool or will some 60 grit sandpaper work? What do you use to seal the exposed wood?

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