Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: raised cabin septic/water connection

  1. #1
    New member
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    2

    Default raised cabin septic/water connection

    I have a raised cabin (adjustable peir blocks). The gravel was poured compacted ontop of tundra and piled trees. The gravel guy said that is a good way to do it in that area (sterling). He laid Typar material before he laid the gravel.

    My question is, 1) What is thew best ay to connect water and septic to a cabin that will probably shift/settle/move? 2) what is the best way to insulate the water and septic where it goes from the ground to the cabin?

    Any ideas would be helpful

    The place will only have one small shower, toilet and kitchen sink.

  2. #2
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Talkeetna
    Posts
    5,714

    Default

    The only real way to do it is to build insulated walls around it using treated lumber and styrofoam insulation. Try and dig down a couple feet to start your wall and tie it into your floor. ABS pipe for the septic tends to have enough flex to deal with most settling, so does copper of plastic water lines.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    29

    Default

    AKDoug,

    I'm curious about this same issue.

    I've read elsewhere that if you don't keep the space under the cabin cold, the heat from the cabin will eventually melt the permafrost and the cabin will sink into the ground. Is that true?

  4. #4
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Talkeetna
    Posts
    5,714

    Default

    If you have permafrost than that could be an issue. However, you really can't put a septic and waterline into real permafrost, so I don't think this is this gentleman's case. Like the other thread near this one says, you deal with permafrost by not allowing it to melt.

    We really don't have permafrost where I am at, so I don't have any experience in dealing with it.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

  5. #5

    Default

    Whitey is in Sterling. No permafrost there.

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Homer and Kenai River
    Posts
    24

    Default

    AKDoug, et al:

    Just joined this forum after stumbling across it recently. Have found it very interesting, and have been impressed with member posts.

    Above, AKDoug suggests "Try and dig down a couple feet to start your wall and tie it into your floor. ABS pipe for the septic tends to have enough flex to deal with most settling, so does copper of plastic water lines."

    My place on the Kenai River is upstream from Sterling on the south side of the river. It is on pilings, an owner built cabin/house (2000 sf) already here when I got it five winters ago.

    I have noted a good three or more inches of seasonal heave around some of the pilings. Most of the pilings themselves don't move noticeably though I do have a couple that heave a fractuion of an inch.

    The waste lines under the flooring and the waste drop down to the line into the septic tank are all wrapped with insulation and have not been a problem. The run from the house to the tank may be short enough that tank heat, along with my use of hot water all winter, keeps the waste lines open.

    The well line riser from grade into the house has been problematic. If our -25 to -40 degree cold snaps last as long as this winter's did I have to keep on top of that vulnerable spot to keep my hot showers going.

    I have held back from a surround installation of the kind you describe because I am concerned that installing a surround that is rigid and tied into both the grade below and the floor above will either break apart under heave loading, or torque the floor. I have considered either a flexible surround (e.g. couple or three layers of insulating blanket as used to cure concrete in cold climes) or a rigid design that is tied to the flooring at the top, and drops into an insulated U-shaped rigid base at grade (maybe not effective because not air tight).

    Or do you think an insulated, rigid, grade-to-flooring surround of the sort you describe (maybe especially with a 100w light bulb in there) would sufficiently minimize heaving?

    I am very good at over-thinking problems, so maybe I am unnecessarily high-centered here. In a situation with grade heaves of 3-4 inches would your first move still be a rigid surround as you describe?

    Thanks to all who might give me your $.02.....

    CinANC

  7. #7
    Member AKFishOn's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Eagle River (Home!)
    Posts
    1,285

    Default

    Speaking of connecting water and sewer to a similar cabin near Sterling, I was planning on only installing a pump for use in the summer. There is a well on site already and the previous owner did this for his RV he parked on the lot. I plan on dropping a pump into the well (in what they call a temporary connection), hose out the top of the well pipe. What type of hose should I use, previous guy had a white RV hose I was looking for something less tacky and a bit less hose taste, perhaps I will just put a pipe 6 inches under the ground or so and then blow it out in the fall before freeze up? Thoughts?

    Thanks

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Leavenworth Wa.
    Posts
    234

    Default Well hose...

    He used the rv hose for a reason.All the "Made in China" (WalMart) hoses contain lead.Not something a guy would care about putting in his well.As far as sewer oulets, what Doug says about pipe having enough flex sounds reasonable.If I was really concerned, I'd go with a 6" rubber boot with clamps under the cabin.That would let the cabin move considerably,without causing any breakage.I do have p/f at my place, but haven't had to cross that bridge.GR...Doug...are you in Wasilla?

  9. #9

    Default

    We use 2" HDPE to make the 200' run from the well to the wood fired hot tub and the cabin in the summer time. I don't think this sort of piping is rated for potable water use but we carry in drinking water anyway as the well has a very high iron content. Pressure ratings are at least 100 psi which is necessary for most well pumps. Although it could be buried, we just lay it out on top of the ground.

    The piping is easy to move around and winterizing is a matter of knocking off the connection at the well and letting it drain out and then blowing out the lines into the cabin. The nice think about this piping is that it is easy to cut, insert a tee and have a hose point anywhere you want one.

  10. #10

    Default

    Used to have a trailer at a campground for a few years. This is a question that frequently came up. There are ways to preclude the taste issue. Using an "RV" hose that is meant for potable water is the key. Found this thread here: https://www.rvusa.com/forum/mbbs22/f...w.asp?tid=7925

    This will eliminate the "hose" taste. Order or research from RV websites.

    Camping World is a good place to start. http://www.campingworld.com/shopping...e-25-ft-/34767

    This is an issue easily remidied. spend a couple of bucks and have the right hose sent to you. Hose Flavor Sucks.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •