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Thread: Wood/Blue Rifles in Sheep Mountains

  1. #1

    Default Wood/Blue Rifles in Sheep Mountains

    Does anybody regularly use wood and blued guns for sheep hunting and have you had real problems? I've done some hunts with wood/blue guns and some with ss/syth. One is a little easier to care for but overall no problems with either. The reason I'm asking is that I'm looking at a nice trim little 308 that is wood and blue and would make a great mountain rifle. I know most folks now lean toward the ss/syth route and I'm trying to convince myself I'll be fine with a wood and blued gun.

  2. #2
    Member Chisana's Avatar
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    Here's a Model 70 with metalwork by Ted Blackburn and stock by Jerry Fisher in the sheep mountains. I've killed relatively few animals in Alaska with a plastic stocked rifle. Having said that I've got a Model 70 being stocked by McMillan as we speak. I get a lot of pleasure out of hunting with a rifle like the one pictured here, but hauling around a rifle that costs as much as a good used truck can be an un-needed headache at times. I see no difference in field performance between wood and plastic stocked hunting rifles provided that the wood stock is properly made.


  3. #3

    Default

    The one sheep hunt I took a blued rifle on, left it rusted badly upon return home. It was a very wet hunt, and it was near impossible to dry the rifle completely at any one point. I quickly decided that I would not use blued rifles for sheep hunting again. If the weather is fair I am sure you could maintain a blued gun, but if its a wet one...its just not worth it to me. When the stainless guns require so little maintenance.

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    Member ACNDHO's Avatar
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    Default blued

    Wet? Try SE wet! Have not had a problem with blued rifles hunting in SE Alaska. Did not matter how wet, always packed an oily cloth and small bottle of oil in a ziplock. Dry as much as you can even if it's a sock, t-shirt whatever. Hit it with the oily cloth and have not had a problem. For inside the barrel put a piece of electricians tape over the end till you shoot. Some guys would shoot through it, but then you need a replacement piece.
    Even a jackass won't stumble on the same stone twice.

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    Member Queen of Kings's Avatar
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    Default what did we

    use before synthetic and blue
    2003 220 Hewescraft Sea Runner 115 Yam'y, Soft Top "Schmidt Happens"

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    Member shphtr's Avatar
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    Is SS and syn stock necessary for sheep hunting - no.
    Does it make life a lot easier - yes
    Does it allow one to concentrate more on sheep hunting and worry less about a wood and blue rifle - yes
    Is it more resistant to rust and scratches - yes
    Do I recommend a SS/syn stock for sheep hunting........yes.

  7. #7
    Member Chisana's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by shphtr View Post
    Is SS and syn stock necessary for sheep hunting - no.
    Does it make life a lot easier - yes
    Does it allow one to concentrate more on sheep hunting and worry less about a wood and blue rifle - yes
    Is it more resistant to rust and scratches - yes
    Do I recommend a SS/syn stock for sheep hunting........yes.
    That's a great summary of the issue.

  8. #8
    Member Rick P's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by shphtr View Post
    Is SS and syn stock necessary for sheep hunting - no.
    Does it make life a lot easier - yes
    Does it allow one to concentrate more on sheep hunting and worry less about a wood and blue rifle - yes
    Is it more resistant to rust and scratches - yes
    Do I recommend a SS/syn stock for sheep hunting........yes.

    Big ditto but my opinion doesn't really count, I hunt them with 2 sticks and a string.
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  9. #9

    Default my take

    You can put some grease on the outside parts and include a small amount of remoil in your field maintenance kit.

    I hunt with both stainless and with blue/wood.

    I don't think that it matters as much. However, if I was into goat hunting I would go ss/syn everytime.

    Sincerely,

    Thomas

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    I much prefer the SS/Synthetic route. Mountain hunting is hard on equipment and I don't want to think about spending time and effort on maintaining a wood/blued gun during a hunt. My sixish pound SS/Syn 7mm-08 looks a little beat up but it shoots just fine.

    Alpine

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    Member JamesMac's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chisana View Post
    Here's a Model 70 with metalwork by Ted Blackburn and stock by Jerry Fisher in the sheep mountains. I've killed relatively few animals in Alaska with a plastic stocked rifle. Having said that I've got a Model 70 being stocked by McMillan as we speak. I get a lot of pleasure out of hunting with a rifle like the one pictured here, but hauling around a rifle that costs as much as a good used truck can be an un-needed headache at times. I see no difference in field performance between wood and plastic stocked hunting rifles provided that the wood stock is properly made.

    Nice ram! What cal m70 & bullet choice?

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    Up to about thirty years ago wood and blue is what everyone used for everything.

  13. #13

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    Thanks for the replies. I agree with shphtr and his assessment. I was looking to see if anybody had any real failures from a wood/blue rifle. A little extra care and possibly some marks on a nice piece of wood are the main concerns I've heard. I can live with that. There doesn't seem to be a hugh disadvantage with wood/blue as long as the stock is properly bedded. They sure are nicer in the hand.

  14. #14
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Default

    Weight and maintenance were the big things for me. My first trip in the mountains I hauled a Tang safety M77 7mm and I didn't have any problems with rust. I did get tired of lugging it around though. I ended up getting a Tikka T3 in 270 and it is light weight, fairly inexpensive and I don't think twice as I bust brush and crawl across rocks with it. If I didn't have the $$ for the Tikka though I can guarantee I would still be hauling that old Ruger up the mountain with a smile on my face!

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    Member Chisana's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JamesMac View Post
    Nice ram! What cal m70 & bullet choice?
    Thanks for the compliment. .270 Win and 150 Nosler Partition.

  16. #16

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    Rifles were made for hunting, not for keeping in the safe. I've used both syn and wood stocked rifles and have no qualms with hunting with either. I've had 1 rifle get rusty on me and that was my fault, I left it in my gun boot for a couple of weeks and didn't know there was water in it. A little Rem oil on some cloth put in a zip lock bag will prevent that from happening.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Amigo Will View Post
    Up to about thirty years ago wood and blue is what everyone used for everything.
    Yea, I wonder how we ever took any game without having SS/Syn rifles??
    The Marines I have seen around the world have the cleanest bodies, the filthiest minds, the highest morale, and the lowest morals of any group of animals I have ever seen. Thank God for the United States Marine Corps! (Eleanor Roosevelt, 1945)

  18. #18

    Default Gun Care

    My only rifle is a synthetic stocked, blued barrel Rem. 700. I replaced the wood stock after I noted a change in point of impact during a winter caribou hunt where temps dipped way into the minus range. I take it hunting for everything and do minimal maintenance in the field. I tape the barrel. I usually had some minor surface rusting after a long wet hunt that I could remove easily. Best thing I ever did for my blued barrel is coat it with flat black rustoleum. This has eliminated 90% of the minor rust I used to get and it reduces the glare of my rifle. I now live in SE and I'm still getting along fine with the blued barrel, just have to be a little more diligent.

  19. #19
    Member Phil's Avatar
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    Default Vote for SS & Synthetic

    I don't hunt sheep but I do use SS & Syn stocks on all my hunting rifles. It just makes life more simple - I don't spend any time thinking about my rifle.

    As far as the comments about what we did before - those relate to any advancement you might think of. Those of us who are old (and maybe wise) give up on the old equipment when something superior comes along. Heck, I don't even use iron sights any more.

  20. #20
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    Default Iron Sights

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil View Post
    I don't hunt sheep but I do use SS & Syn stocks on all my hunting rifles. It just makes life more simple - I don't spend any time thinking about my rifle.

    As far as the comments about what we did before - those relate to any advancement you might think of. Those of us who are old (and maybe wise) give up on the old equipment when something superior comes along. Heck, I don't even use iron sights any more.
    I would use iron sights on occassion if I could, but my eyes dont do 3 planes of focus anymore Reading glasses with a scope does workl, however
    NRA Lifetime Member

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