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Thread: which camera to get? E520 or rebel XSi

  1. #1
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    Question which camera to get? E520 or rebel XSi

    ok I am getting a camera either around xmas or slightly after, depending on $$$ around the house. I like the e520 because the image stabilization is in the body, and the lenses are cheaper because of this. But the Canon Image Stabilization is in the lenses which I hear is actually a better system, is it really? I admit, the canon lenses prices do scare me away from them, but if it is a better system........
    I will be using this camera(which ever one I get) for LOTS of outdoor photography (hunting Fishing, snowmachining, skiiing, lots of flying, and traveling) Plus the normal family stuff, kids games,
    Lets here from some people have used these cameras. which one do I get? which one is easier to use(honestly this really doesn't matter, if I can fly an airplane, I can figure out this camera!!!) but i need the advice!!!! I am such an anal researcher!!!

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    Image stabilization in the body has a potential problem: if it breaks, then you would have to send it to the repair shop. Both Canon, and Nikon have IS in the lenses for that reason. However, don't let that steer you away from what you want, since IS is most useful at low light conditions, or when shooting handheld.

    But lest say that you use a camera that has no IS. In this case you can compensate buy buying the fastest primes you can afford, and set the camera on a tripod during low light conditions (if needed). The problem is that the fastest lenses are the most expensive, and so fast lenses with IS. Now any lens with IS is more expensive than the same lens without IS, because IS is a desired feature: it allows the camera to take the photo even during shaking or movement.

    In my view, Canon should come up with an upgrade to the XSi in a matter of months. Canon upgrades its entry level cameras within 18 months. All this means is that when the new upgrade is introduced to the market, the older model loses a portion of its value, which is not a total loss if you take your time at the moment it's price drops.

    I would prefer the XSi with a couple of fast lenses, and a good tripod.

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    Image stabilization in the body has a potential problem: if it breaks, then you would have to send it to the repair shop. If the IS is in the lens, when one lens breaks you can still use the other lenses while that one is being repaired. Both Canon, and Nikon have IS in the lenses for that reason. However, don't let that steer you away from what you want, since IS is most useful at low light conditions, or when shooting handheld.

    But lest say that you use a camera that has no IS. In this case you can compensate by using the fastest primes you can afford, and set the camera on a tripod during low light conditions (only when needed). The problem is that the fastest lenses are the most expensive, and so fast lenses with IS. Now any lens with IS is more expensive than the same lens without IS, because IS is a desired feature: it allows the camera to take the photo even during shaking or movement.

    In my view, Canon should come up with an upgrade to the XSi in a matter of months. Canon upgrades its entry level cameras within 18 months. All this means is that when the new upgrade is introduced to the market, the older model loses a portion of its value, which is not a total loss if you take your time and buy it when its price drops.

    I would prefer the XSi with a couple of fast lenses, and a good tripod. Just like a lot of other people in this forum, none of my lenses have IS. I use a Canon 40D with lenses I can afford:

    Tokina 12-24mm f/4 (landscapes)
    EF 100mm f/2.8 Macro (macro, or prime outdoors)
    EF 200mm f/2.8L (close-ups with a Kenko tube, and widlife such as moose)
    Tamron 17-50mm f/2.8 (pictures of family, dog, etc.)

    I plan to buy a 50mm f/1.4 one of these days.

    A 200mm lens is not the best wildlife lens, but the one I have can be used with a 1.4x Kenko Pro 300 teleconverter to close the distance a little. Most times I just get closer to the subject (if it's too far or too small). A moose, however, is quite large.

  4. #4
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    Like Ray I have a 40D. I love that camera. Getting ready to pick up a second in fact now that prices have come down (currently $839 at B&H Video website). Depending on your interest level and budget, you may want to take a look at the 40D. There are some great deals now on the 40D body and the 40D with lens at B&H. Big difference in it compared to the Xsi. But the Xsi will certainly take great pictures. But big difference in ergonomics and build quality. The lenses cost. Period. Perhaps pick out a camera and one lens to get started and add lenses over time. That is a logical approach. As for the IS in the lens, I have the Canon 24-105 and 100-400. Both have IS and work flawlessly. I have used the Xsi (brother and friend of mine own that camera) and it is a very capable camera, but feels like a toy compared to the 40D. But this is something you would have to determine for yourself. You may prefer the smaller and lighter Xsi depending on your needs. Lots of great info on the forum, www.photo.net Go to the Canon forum and read some there. I also like the Nature forum. At any rate, a camera, a lens, and a tripod are all you need to get started. If landscape photography is of interest, consider a Canon 17-40 and a circular polarizer. Those two items coupled with a quality tripod would be great for landscapes. Just depends on what your interest are. I just got my first DSLR last November so maybe some more experienced photographers will chime in. But I can tell you that it is a wonderful and rewarding hobby. Below are a few links that may be of interest.

    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...R_Digital.html

    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...R_Digital.html

    http://photo.net/canon-eos-digital-camera-forum/

    http://photography-on-the.net/forum/

    http://photography-on-the.net/forum/...d.php?t=609487

    http://photocamel.com/forum/
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    I apologize for the double post above. Hopefully the Web Master can delete the first one, and leave the re-edited second one.

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    I would like stabilization in the body, so that it would apply to all the lenses I buy. For that reason I sometimes advocate the Pentax system, even though I use a Canon system.

    If you look at Olympus' high end lenses, you will be shocked at their prices. They are good, and they are fast, but wow do they think they're special. They do put out some good kit lenses for fairly low prices though. But then Canon's 18-55 IS and 50-250 IS lenses are quite good, and amazingly well priced for the image quality with IS. Their non-IS version of the 18-55, and the old 75-300 are not nearly as good optically.

    Oly uses a smaller sensors than Nikon, Canon, Sony & Pentax, and this causes more noise than larger sensors. Oly does a good job with their built in noise reduction, but this causes smearing of the image. It's all a trade off somewhere.

    Personally, I think you would be happy with any of these, but if I was buying into a system, it wouldn't be Oly as my first choice.

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    Default thanks!

    I am leaning towards the canon with the more research I have done.

  8. #8

    Default stick w/ Canon or Nikon

    I have been shooting for years and in my experience Canon or Nikon provide the best product for the money, including resale value. If you time it right and buy a model just as the revised version will be introduced to the market you can get some great deals. I have thousands of dollars of equipment, you know which camera I pick up most of the time for casual photos? The nikon d40 I bought at deeeep discount for something like $400.00 with a kit lens new. One comment, if you are concerned about low light photography look at Nikons latest full frame or the Canon full frame 5d. Anyway if shooting digital shoot Nikon, Canon or both.

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