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Thread: .500 Wyoming Express

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    Default .500 Wyoming Express

    Does anyone have any experience with this round. I am looking for a new large revolver, and am curious about the .500 WE, the .480 Ruger, 454 Casull/45 LC, etc. I think maybe the 480, but want to know about the shootability of the bigger rounds--I have no problem with the recoil of a 44 mag, but am concerned about round placement/shootability on anything bigger. Big is good, but big and accurate is deadly.

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    Member gunrman's Avatar
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    Hey Toby. Just my two cents, but I am partial to the 454. My Taurus doesn't kick much more than a 44 with heavy loads and you have the option of shooting 45 long colts too. If you are recoil shy, i would suggest starting with cowboy loads in 45 LC and then move up as you feel confident. BTW I do hunt with mine and have taken some nice animals with it.

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    The 500WE is a proprietary round made for the Freedom Arms single action revolver. In my opinion it isn’t very popular probably because the ammunition is not readily available and it’s belted. The 500WE and the 500JRH are basically the same performance wise, however, the JRH is just a shorten 500S&W so you could make your own brass if needed as the 500S&W case is readily available. The Freedom Arms revolver is expensive but I guess you get your money’s worth in quality and customer service. One of the manufacturers of the 500JRH is Magnum Research and their single action revolver line is called BFR. You will save about $500 going BFR as opposed to Freedom Arms without giving up anything relative to strength, quality or customer service. It’s just a matter of personal preference. You can get factory ammo for the 500WE from Grizzly Cartridge Co, which is a 440 grain at 1200 fps. You can get 500JRH factory from Jack Huntington although the ammo is manufacturer by Buffalo Bore in two loadings – a 440 grain at 950fps and a 425 grain at 1,350fps. Both revolvers are about a pound lighter than the X frame S&W but are single action, whereas I’m sure you know the Smith is double action and has superior performance over both of these calibers starting at about 465 grains. The WE and JRH will match the Smith’s performance at 440 grains but does so with a hell of a lot more “felt-recoil” probably due to the weight difference and grip/frame design. I have both the JRH and Smith. If you keep the JRH at 1,100fps or less with the 440 grain HC the recoil is similar to a full house load in a 8-3/8 model 29. If you push the 440 grain or 460 grain to 1,400/1,450fps it will get your attention in a hurry. The 425 grain JRH factory load out of a 5.5” barrel is no slouch and according to some it kills African game such as the Cape Buffalo in the same fashion as the 375H&H. I think you’ll like either cartridge. Here’s a photo I pulled off another site of the Freedom Arms and the BFR so you can see how they compare in size etc. The JRH I think is 5.5” while the FA may be 6 or 7.7” – not sure. With my JRH I can keep 10 shots within a 10 inch circle at 50 yards off-hand. With my forearms on a sandbag the group is under 4" most of the time.
    Last edited by JoeJ; 01-20-2009 at 17:39.

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    Default Thanks

    Still open to any and all opinions and suggestions. Thanks for the info so far. It is much appreciated!!!!

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    In a SRH the 480 is easy shooting kinda similar to a 44 in my opinion. I find the 454 uncomfortable to shoot more than about 12 round through in a WWG Wolverine but have no problem with the 480. As a side note the 480 SRH can be rechambered to handle both 480 and 475 linbaugh. The Linebaugh is a real powerhouse capable of taking any game on the planet, factory ammo is also avilablefor it.

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    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
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    Default Look at the S&W 460 Mag. X frame

    I just got a .460 S&W Mag. a couple weeks back. Like you I was looking at all the same single action guns and trying to decide between .480 and .454 when I was handed a S&W 460XVR to shoot. Went to Chimo Guns and choked down the price that afternoon. It was big bucks, $1200, came with 2 sets of sights, 2 muzzle brakes with allen wrench, and chime gave me about $100 in ammo. It shoots .45 Long Colt, .454 Casull, as well as .460S&W Mag. The 460 S&W is the fastest handgun round ever made and currently 2nd most powerful, the S&W .500 being the first.

    I love it, the muzzle brake lets the beast shoot like a .44 until you get to the heaviest bullet sizes. I got the 4" version and can hold about a 6" circle off a bench rest or sticks with open sights. I packed with a cross draw shoulder rig last weekend snowshoeing last weekend and hardly knew it was there heavy is it is. I have never been a double action guy, I'm a single action cowboy gun kind of guy, but the versatility of this one won me over. Look at one before you buy another big bore.

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    I don't think you can go wrong with the Ruger Super Redhawk in 480. I have one with the 9 1/4 Barrel and find it very pleasant to shoot.

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    As I've said in many other posts, I've been fortunate to shoot many 454's, and 475 and 500 Linebaughs, in custom Ruger super blackhawks, bisleys, super redhawks, and FA 83's.

    I personally cannot handle the recoil of the 475 and 500's in a gun of reasonable weight. I can shoot the 454, but it has very snappy recoil due to the higher powder charges compared to the bigger bores.

    Then I got a chance to shoot one of the first 480's, a 7 1/2" SRH, and it was everything I wanted in a big bore revolver. Accurate, powerful, and most of all shootable. It felt just like a big 44 mag, same sort of recoil just a bigger push. But I was driving 400 gr @ 1200 fps, and grouping 5 into 1" at 50 yds (scoped). So I ended trading into my own 480 7 1/2" srh and have put about 5000 rounds through it working up loads when they were few and far between, and just enjoying shooting it.

    The downside of the 480 is it's pretty much a handloading proposition, and better still if you cast your own bullets. I've worked up loads for about 1/2 dozen different cast bullets from 310 to 460 gr, and every single one of them would group 5 into 1" at 50yds when I found the right load. Pretty impressive weather a sedate 310 gr @ 950 fps, 400 gr @ 1200 fps or 460 gr @ 1050 fps.

    I had a custom 275 gr swc mold made, basically a sized up Elmer Keith bullet. My goal was to finally get target accuracy @ 700 fps. I haven't found the magic load that does that, but with blue dot @ 1000 fps it'll put them all right in there. And even with that "mild" load, I have something that'll take any deer or caribou at iron sight ranges.

    Getting the same sort of performance out of a 50 cal would be great, but then you have the expense of a custom gun, and more expensive dies, brass etc.

    480, best big bore revolver per $, and per pound of recoil.

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    Default Thanks for info .480 is sounding better

    The 480 sounds pretty good. The only problem is that I don't handload. I am going to test a 460 smith soon. I hopefully will decide soon!!

    Thanks everyone.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post
    As I've said in many other posts, I've been fortunate to shoot many 454's, and 475 and 500 Linebaughs, in custom Ruger super blackhawks, bisleys, super redhawks, and FA 83's.

    I personally cannot handle the recoil of the 475 and 500's in a gun of reasonable weight. I can shoot the 454, but it has very snappy recoil due to the higher powder charges compared to the bigger bores.

    Then I got a chance to shoot one of the first 480's, a 7 1/2" SRH, and it was everything I wanted in a big bore revolver. Accurate, powerful, and most of all shootable. It felt just like a big 44 mag, same sort of recoil just a bigger push. But I was driving 400 gr @ 1200 fps, and grouping 5 into 1" at 50 yds (scoped). So I ended trading into my own 480 7 1/2" srh and have put about 5000 rounds through it working up loads when they were few and far between, and just enjoying shooting it.

    The downside of the 480 is it's pretty much a handloading proposition, and better still if you cast your own bullets. I've worked up loads for about 1/2 dozen different cast bullets from 310 to 460 gr, and every single one of them would group 5 into 1" at 50yds when I found the right load. Pretty impressive weather a sedate 310 gr @ 950 fps, 400 gr @ 1200 fps or 460 gr @ 1050 fps.

    I had a custom 275 gr swc mold made, basically a sized up Elmer Keith bullet. My goal was to finally get target accuracy @ 700 fps. I haven't found the magic load that does that, but with blue dot @ 1000 fps it'll put them all right in there. And even with that "mild" load, I have something that'll take any deer or caribou at iron sight ranges.

    Getting the same sort of performance out of a 50 cal would be great, but then you have the expense of a custom gun, and more expensive dies, brass etc.

    480, best big bore revolver per $, and per pound of recoil.
    I had a 480 that I sold, and then bought a 500. The S&W Model 500 w/compensator is not hard to shoot, especially when loaded with heavier rounds. MY (actually Ranger Rick's) "sized up Keith" is a 535gr 50-caliber version ...and it's not harder to shoot than my old 480 and I'm pushing it with a max 32 grains of H110. It's the small/fast rounds that kick more than they should. I'm very pleased with the shootability of the Model 500. Mo' meplat, mo' betta!

    If I didn't reload and wanted a wide variety of ammo to shoot and practice with, I'd buy the .454 Casull. If I wanted the best (production) hunting handgun, I'd buy the 460 S&W. If I wanted the most knock-down power for a production handgun, I'd buy what I bought ...the Model 500 S&W. I think the biggest weakness that the .480 has is the ammo. Ammo is available everywhere, but not with as wide a range of types as the .454, otherwise I'd recommend the .480 as well. There's nothing at all wrong with that gun and Paul's right about the recoil.

    Brian



    Brian

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