Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 26

Thread: things I didn't need to bring..

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    today-Idaho
    Posts
    394

    Default things I didn't need to bring..

    On each of my 3 Alaskan fly-in hunts(1 float) I brought most of the recommended items. At the end of each hunt I took note of which items I never used in an attempt to reduce weight next time, here's a short list:

    Way too much food-I brought back almost all of my rice and ramen and hot chocolate(it just required extra time to boil water),
    Clothes-extra underwear and pants and shirts that were never worn on a 14 day hunt,
    Batteries-I just took way too many spares-I spent my time hunting or sleeping not reading in the dark.
    Eating utensils- a bunch of knives, spoons, forks etc. I cleaned up after myself each meal, could have made due with 1 each and a spare
    Bullets, rifle, salt, knives,-basically anything you might need if you harvest game-could have saved a bunch there but they will make the next trip too.

    Other people may have needed some of these things or situations may have changed requiring my use of them as well, but, next time I may switch out some of my items for others.

    What items have you taken that you later found YOU did not need?
    Last edited by the nikster; 12-06-2008 at 05:23. Reason: punctuation

  2. #2

    Default Me Too

    I brought way too many clothes on my early fly-in hunts as well. For a 10-12 day hunt, I brought a fresh pair of wool socks for each day, as well as three pairs of pants, shirts, and long underwear (in addition to the clothes I flew in wearing, which I try to use for flyin/flyout only).

    Now, for a 10-day hunt I bring 3-4 pairs of wool socks, as well as three pairs of sock liners, and rotate them each day, hanging them on a bush to aerate between wearings. I also go with 2 pairs of pants and 2 shirts, still use 3 sets of long underwear tho.

    I'm good with 1 plate/fork/spoon/knife, just clean them after the meal.

  3. #3
    Member B-radford's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    653

    Default

    I think that it is pretty easy to bring to many cloths for sure, but i always think that you should always bring extra extra socks, they dont take up to much extra room and cold wet feet can ruin any trip. I agree with mdhunter, one plate/fork/spoon/knife work good.
    Every time i return from a hunting trip, i always find something extra that i didnt need. I guess it all depends on where or what you hunt.

    On my last caribou hunting trip, we had two four wheelers break down, i found that we had brought to many tools. While i think that there is nothing wrong with having to many tools with you when i comes to four wheelers, it sucks when you have too many tools that dont fit a single bolt on your four wheeler.

  4. #4
    Member Vince's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Fairbanks most the time, Ancorage some of the time,& on the road Kicking Anti's all the time
    Posts
    8,989

    Default

    I don't do the fly in but i do pack WAY to much gear... and i tend to spend all summer hauling it in and then only a week to get it All back out in the fall...

    FOOD is by far the biggest item i over stock on EVERY trip seems as i pack to leave ... i am thinking dang these kids always eat me out of house and home.. only to get there and not eat it...i am still unsure what the kids eat on our forays....rocks i think.

    I have been up here so long that i HAVE to pack cold gear for every one. just in case.. never really have needed it...

    knifes... i am horrible here... i carry 6-8 of them.. i don't like to sharpen while skinning... and i like this one for that task and that one for this....when in reality i could use 1

    i am still trying to sort my "just in case items" though after 20 some years of it.. i think they are stuck on it...and now i add stuck because the kids are along...
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

  5. #5
    Member moose-head's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    @ Seminary, Dubuque Ia
    Posts
    839

    Default

    I didn't need my freakin' rifle on my last two (I did use the heck out of my packframe on my buddies moose though).

  6. #6
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Talkeetna
    Posts
    5,714

    Default

    Food is my biggest culprit. I brought back enough the last three years to do three more years of hunting. I have found that I simply do not eat when I am out. I am overweight and my body does weird things when I am camping. It shuts down and I live off of one package of instant oatmeal, a Powerbar, and a bagel or two per day. I brought back all but one of my Mtn House meals from Kodiak and we were out in the field for 5 dinners.

    Clothing is my second issue. I always bring too many socks and long underwear. I finally got it down this year in Kodiak to two complete sets of long underwear and three sets of socks. This worked out perfect.

    I have a guide friend that went from Aug 10th to Sept 20th wearing only one set of base layer, one set of fleece and two pairs of socks. He did change his underwear (3 pairs) on a rotation washing one set every night.

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Valley trash.....and proud of it.
    Posts
    813

    Default

    Food is one thing I will still bring way to much of. I have been weathered in way to many times not to appreciate to much food.

    I'll cut weight in other places. I dont take to many articles of clothing anymore, just socks.

  8. #8

    Default cloths

    Before this season I would have agreed that I always have too many cloths but..

    This was a wet float trip this year. Flat water, but lots of rain. I have never used all of my cloths on any trip until this one. 9 days in the field, rained all but one day, and was generally cool.

    I generally take the following on float trips:

    2 hunting pants
    2 hunting shirts
    socks for each day in the field
    1 camp pant
    2 sets long under ware (top and bottom)
    2 fleece jackets (light)
    Rain gear

    This trip simply did not allow time to stay in any one camp long enough to dry out. When we set up camp for multi days it rained nearly the entire time. Setting up and tearing down camp in the rain multiple times.

    Long story short. My list of cloths will not be reduced, you never know when you are going to NEED them.

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Kenai
    Posts
    1,888

    Default

    Game bags
    Vance in AK.

    Matthew 6:33
    "But seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added to you."

  10. #10
    Member Fuse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    North Pole, AK
    Posts
    179

    Default Too much is not always bad

    I agree, I also pack too much, but...

    - I haven't had to use my first aid kit yet, thank God (and despite my efforts) but it's still huge and I still take it

    - I still take too much food too, but then again I have yet to get stuck out for long

    - Too much clothes, but I haven't fallen in a river in the fall lately, but still keep a set in a dry bag just in case

    I guess the way I see it, AK is the most dangerous place to hunt because of the huge weather swings and freezing cold glacial fed streams. I think we can all cut down on a few things like batteries, until your GPS and headlamp die on a mountainside in the rain. I would rather curse the extra weight than pray to make it out alive to see my family again. I believe in the "ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure." I only say that for all the folks who read the forum and don't live up here and aren't used to an environment like up here. A snowstorm in September after a 70 degree day is different than a rain shower in Alabama. Just my $0.02.

    Fuse

  11. #11

    Default

    Well said.

    Some of my buddies laugh at me because I always tend to "what if" scenarios and pack little "extras"; however, I would much rather be prepared for an emergency than be panicking because I don't have what I need. I am extremely weight conscious and have a log with the weights of all my gear. On most trips, I have supplies that I didn't have to use, but I can't justify leaving them at home. To go without extra batteries, food, socks and a GPS is not wise IMO. Even if you are on a guided hunt, what happens if your guide gets hurt or killed and the SAT phone goes in the drink or gets chewed up by a bear? Unless you are really good at reading a compass and topo map (most guys are not) how are you going to find your way back to the pick-up point? With all the extraneous variables that Alaska throws at you, I think it is best to err on the side of caution.

  12. #12
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    11,415

    Default

    I think I have it pared down pretty well. At this point I am looking for lighter versions of stuff I allready have. I have been taking in less and less Mountain House each trip. It does depend on what I am doing though. I can go with about 35lbs for a 3 day hunt including my pack. I only take/wear 1 pair of pants and I carry a set of marmot micro fleece pants for both sleeping and to wear under my hunting pants on very cold days. 1 extra set of underwear, 1 extra shirt, 1 pair of socks per 3 days of hunting. I wear the wigwam InGenious socks and they are FANTASTIC! I also like Merino wool socks. I wore Sitka mt pants this year and they fell apart so I am not sure what is goint to get the nod next season. So far I have carried a compressible cold weather jacket and I have never used it so it might get the boot. I have moved to an Eberlestock X1 pack for most of my local hunting for moose.

    I guess the big thing is what type of hunting you are doing. If I am taking out the boat for a 1-3 day hunt then I pack good food. I love cheddar brauts cooked on a stick over a camp fire!! If I go out with a meat wagon on a multi day hunt then there is a good chance I will eat like a king then as well!

    To be honest the thing I have been hauling too much of is ME. I gotta lose some weight! I am carrying about 60 extra lbs that need to go by next August... It is amazing how steep that mountain looks when you are tipping the scale at 275...

  13. #13
    Member Rick P's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer Alaska
    Posts
    2,339

    Default

    Lujon
    Leave the machines at home, shoe leather hunting slims you down quick! BTW 8 months till sheep 4 till bear!
    BHA Member
    Bowyer to the forces of light in the land of the midnight sun.
    The 3 fold way: Every step we take as we walk through life effects, our family, our comunity and ourselves. One should walk thoughtfuly.

  14. #14
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    730

    Default Things I didn't need to bring ....

    I take too much food. But, should something happen, ....

    A common sense policy among dog mushers on long treks is ... always carry two headlamps. Once, on a famous 1000 mile race, at one of the last checkpoints, I decided to lighten my load as much as possible. Left all my spare clothes and "excess anything", that wasn't mandatory, behind. I'd never had a headlamp die, so I left behind my spare headlamp, but took 1 spare set of lithium batteries. Needless to say, in a flat, featureless area, of hard packed snow, at night, in a stiff wind, my headlamp died. Without a spare headlamp, the spare batteries were just excess weight. I ended up in my sleeping bag beside my team until the twilight before dawn, when I could feed and resume travel. 6 racing hours and 3 places LOST and unrecoverable. I haven't repeated the same error on those necessities that I can't do without.

    Common sense, not arrogance or stupidity, should rule.

  15. #15
    Member Vince's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Fairbanks most the time, Ancorage some of the time,& on the road Kicking Anti's all the time
    Posts
    8,989

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick P View Post
    Lujon
    Leave the machines at home, shoe leather hunting slims you down quick! BTW 8 months till sheep 4 till bear!

    HERE HERE to RICK

    the boy and i were just planning spring bear tonight.. as he is headed to Idahoe, to spend qualitiy time with his father after school next spring...
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

  16. #16
    New member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    5,417

    Default A work in progress...

    I've pared it down pretty good now I think. But, I have always taken too much ammo and too many pairs of gloves. On a wheeler hunt for moose I take a heavier coat and pants plus a pair of lighter pants and jacket for lounging in camp or my partners wall tent On a sheep hunt the clothes I take I can wear them all at one time layered up if need be. The only extras are 3 pair of socks, a pair of skivvies and one set of polys. No need for extra pants. A pair of polys and rain pants can be an extra if my pants need hung to dry or something. I finally got the gloves down to 2 pair. A pair of leather gloves for brush busting, camp chores, 4 footed mountan crawling, and a pair of warm hunting type gloves. And the last couple hunt I only hauled in 12 rounds of ammo instead of the usual 20 or so...

  17. #17
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    11,415

    Default

    I will point out that I bought the wheeler AFTER hunting season. I did use the boat once but still only to move camp then hunted from there on foot. I honestly covered well over a hundred miles on foot this year a lot of it in the mountains. I was down to 249 but I guess I found it this winter! I don't ever seem to climb past 275 though no matter what I eat...

  18. #18
    Member akshrop's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    North Pole, AK
    Posts
    448

    Default

    I typically hunt via boat, so I don’t worry about extras, but my overage list would be:

    All the fishing gear I bring, “just in case.”
    Extra guns, “cause you never know how many bears will attack.”
    Boxes and boxes of ammo, see above.
    Food for 3 cooked meals a day and a box or two of MREs, “just cause we might need extra food.”
    Clean cloths for a daily change, “cause the critters subscribe to In Style.”
    Bottles and bottles of propane, “cause I can’t remember that we only used 1 last week.”
    Gas, “cause we might decide to travel an extra 400 miles.”
    Gas, “cause I have run out.”
    Guns, “cause this one looks better than that one with today’s outfit.”
    Flashlights, headlamps, lanterns… “cause they are cool and I haven’t used this newest, smallest torch ever.”
    Gloves, basically the same as above.

    I had to buy a bigger boat “cause I need more stuff in the field.”

  19. #19
    Member akjeff's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    788

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    To be honest the thing I have been hauling too much of is ME. I gotta lose some weight! I am carrying about 60 extra lbs that need to go by next August... It is amazing how steep that mountain looks when you are tipping the scale at 275...
    This is probably the best stuff to not bring. 60lbs is 9 1/2 gallons of gas for the boat also. Most of us (me for sure) could use to leave the extra flab at home. Just imagine how light that moose quarter would be without it.

    Speaking of food. Way back when I was a Boy Scout we did 50 miler hikes. On one such 50 miler the food was at a minimum. The package of mountain house read "serves 4", well that keeps 4 people from starving to death. Not nearly enough calories to keep anyone in our troop happy. Luckily we got into some trout and started living not just surviving. I don't like to go light on food. I will wear the same clothes, underwear, socks etc, even wet, for 10+ days straight, before I skrimp on food.

  20. #20
    Member Roland on the River's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    1,690

    Default "Too much food"?

    Four of us made a spring Kodiak Bear hunt(2permits)
    In order to make the planes weight limit we calculated every meal with no extras to speak of. We were due for pickup om May 11th.
    For the next 4 days it was warm, bright and sunny. The planes were flying everywhere.
    We packed up each morning expecting our plane. We were down to pancake mix and ketchup.
    After many meals of this, I thought seriously of taking a subsistence deer. Finally we see a boat and flag it in. They call our pilot only to be told by his wife "he;s out spotting herring and will pick them up tomorrow"
    We say call anyone and get us out. We get picked up that PM and seeing we had'nt paid yet for the trip inI figured Jack would tell the pilots wife forget it. But he paid for the one way.
    I still prefer butter and syrup with my pancakes.
    Moral, a couple Mountain House meals as spares.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •