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Thread: Glass Boats?

  1. #1
    Member outaMT's Avatar
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    Default Glass Boats?

    Need some guidance on glass boats…24-26 foot range. I’m a year or two from purchase, and I’ve narrowed down my choice for an aluminum salt boat… but thought I would add a glass boat choice as well to keep my options open.
    Looking for a good solid make, room for 4 and gear for weekend trips; thoughts on Seasport, Grady White or C-Dory? Thanks all!

  2. #2

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    My personal preference in a fiberglass boat would be the C-Dory Cat, Osprey, Seasport, and Skagit Orca; in that order. I wouldn't consider any other glass boat than those listed.

    I have owned a 24' Osprey Fisherman and a 24' Seasport Explorer. I prefer the Osprey over the Seasport. The 24' Osprey is a larger boat than the 24' Seasport. Even though I love the looks of the Seasport, the visibility out of the cabin is poor compared to the Osprey. In the Osprey you sit up higher because the hull is deeper and the cabin floor is higher. Access to the bow area is way better and more safe on the Osprey boats versus the Seasports. The only Seasport in your size range I would buy is the Pilothouse (raised cabin). I have not owned a C-Dory or a Skagit Orca, but I have been on a number of them; I like the C-Dory Cat. It's stable, wide, twin engines are nice, and visibility out of the cabin is good. The Skagit Orca is a beautiful boat, but suffers from the same problem that the Seasports have. The cabins are too low in my opinion, so visibility out of the cabin is not up to par.

  3. #3

    Smile

    I am a Sea Sport owner and truly love it! Sea Sport has a 26footer and also a 28footer that are just now hitting the market. The new 28 has a 9'9" beam, trailering might be an issue, plus "used" does not exist yet. I would speak with any fiberglass or engine shop who has touched Ospreys for a second opinion, I have heard some horror stories about the early models that really surprised me. My brother-in-law has a C-Dory and can go anywhere on a teaspoon of gas, Cordova, Valdez, you name it, he can get there. Good luck with the shopping!

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    I'd add Olympic to your list - they made a tough boat back in the day.

  5. #5

    Default If you can afford it.....

    Get the TomCat, or if your really rich, get the Glacier Bay cat. What great boats. Truth be told, you get a heck of a lot of boat in the CD 22 for the money. In fact, I don't know if in that exact size, there is a better boat. Good luck in your searches!

  6. #6

    Default Tomcat

    out of those listed above, the Tomcat by c-dory is my favorite. My family does own one so i may be biased, but we've only had it for a half of a summer so far but its an awesome boat. BUT...if you're looking for 4 people on board, it gets a little tight. its really a 3 person boat. Unless your family and friends are real skinny, 4 people won't fit very comfortably. We do it, and its fine, but its not the best for 4 people.

    I've always liked the looks of the osprey, they look like they have an amazing ride.
    I think the seasports sides are too low in the back.


    and if youre looking for a good ride, we've gone 38+ mph in 3-4 foot chop muiltiple times in the tomcat. Our drinks dont spill when sitting on the table. Couldn't do that with our last boat

  7. #7

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    If your thinking of C-Dory, get a mouth piece also. I have been on two different dorys and they will beat you if your in some chop! Its a great low horse power, self plaining hull. But the lack of bottom V really hurts the ride.

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    For what it's worth, SeaSport bought out Osprey several years ago, and currently produces both lines of boats. IMO, both are well-built, rugged, seaworthy boats, and either would serve your needs very well. As between Osprey and Seasport, if I were you, I'd just focus on getting the best boat with the best features and price, and wouldn't get too hung up on whether it's an Osprey or a SeaSport. Same probably goes for Skagit Orca (although I don't have any personal experience with that brand).

    C-Dory also makes a very nice boat, but as noted above, it has a different hull form than the Seasports and Ospreys. The tradeoff is that the C-Dory, with its flatter bottom, is more fuel effiecient, whereas the Osprey and Sesport, with their deep-V hulls, provide a smoother ride.

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    Default Olympic

    Quote Originally Posted by Vek View Post
    I'd add Olympic to your list - they made a tough boat back in the day.
    I agree...... Maybe because I own one and LOVE IT!!! My last boat was a 19' HewesCraft Sea Runner. I liked it to. Big difference between glass and aluminum. I personaly think there is more maintenance involved when owning a glass boat but I sure enjoy the quiet ride and the warm cozy cabin. Then again maintenance on a larger aluminum boat can be costly if welds in the hull or cross members start to crack. If I was to chose another aluminum boat I'd go with a Silver Steak they make an aluminum boat with the comforts of a glass boat.

  10. #10
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    Thanks for the feedback guys….This really helped me out. I’ve been looking at the suggestions and comments and found some really nice boats. Either alum or glass, I’m looking at about the same price for what I want…65-75K. At least I know which glass boats to be looking at now.


    I checked out the Silver Streak web page…WoW! I may need to cost out a custom with them and compare. Does anybody have any experience with the SS?



    One more thing, of all the boats that have been mentioned on this thread, would a 22 footer do ok in PWS or Cook waters? I know there would be space limitations for peeps and sleeping; but how about the safety factor? Could a 22 footer get you into the bigger water for the bigger fish?


    I’ll be moving up this spring, and I’ve been using this forum to help me gear up! Thank you all! Thanks again for all the great info.

  11. #11

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    A 22 will do the job just fine. But in alaskan waters you will get 2 foot'itest really fast and want a bigger boat. I would go with a 24-26.

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    If you put a 200/225/250 horse 4-stroke on an outboard bracket on the back end of a 22' Seasport/Osprey/Orca, you'd have more usable fishing room than on a 26' with an I/O. Moreso with a 24, and still more with a 26 or 27. A couple of cheap-ish motorless 27' short cabin Seasports have popped up in the last year or two down in Southeast AK, and I've long thought one of those with a 300 horse suzuki on a bracket would be quite a fishboat.

    I've fished off of a couple of the boats in that range - a 23' Olympic w/ outboard, a 24' Osprey with inboard gas, and a 26' Hewes w/ outboard. The 24' Osprey was noticeably more comfortable in big offshore water than the Hewes, but the Hewes does fine all the same. We never got into anything too messy in the Olympic, but it took standard afternoon PWS and Seward chop like a man, and has a good hull/cabin/cockpit design for shedding water - as good as any of the others. Something to think about with the Osprey - the gunwales in the cockpit are so high, that I at 6'3" had a very tough time reaching overboard to rinse slime off my hands. The Olympic and Hewes were far friendlier in that regard. Also, if you plan to use a 8-15 horse kicker motor while fishing (and you should, for both slow trolling and slowing a drift while jigging), the Osprey will need a 25" shaft on the kicker, where most kickers are offered with only a 20" as their "extra long" shaft. My 26' hewes also has a 25" shaft kicker, and it works FANTASTIC for slowing a drift while jigging/mooching, and while trolling. Get that kicker prop well below the hull line of the boat.

    If the Silver Streak outfit you're talking about is the one down on Vancouver Island (Sooke), they have an excellent reputation down there, and build a solid boat. There's quite a hotbed of welded tin boat manufacturers down that way - Vancouver Island, Lower Mainland of BC, and the Puget Sound region.

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hunta View Post
    If your thinking of C-Dory, get a mouth piece also. I have been on two different dorys and they will beat you if your in some chop! Its a great low horse power, self plaining hull. But the lack of bottom V really hurts the ride.
    The solution to this with the CD 22 is trim tabs (the biggest you can fit) and permatrims; especially with the twins. Then it does not do it nearly as much, if at all. The thing that is funny about the CD 22 and the CD 25 is when it gets really, really crappy, and I have been out when it is really horrible, I usually am still on a really slow 10-12 MPH plane (yes they plane that slow) and I make better time then the deep v boats of similar size do. Plus, I am still on plane which makes things so much easier to control. As far as 2 extra feet boat making them safer? I suppose, but not to the extent that you would think. It is marginal. I say buy what you want. And, maybe even most importantly, buy the one your wife wants. Good luck in your quest.

  14. #14

    Default

    One more thing, of all the boats that have been mentioned on this thread, would a 22 footer do ok in PWS or Cook waters?
    I use a 21 foot Striper and have truly tested her in 10 footers in 50 mile winds and she brought me home from Montague.

  15. #15

    Default Sea Sport, Hewes, C-Dory

    All three do something better than each one and all three do something worse than each one. This is based on experience of them in the water together at the same time side by side, myself and my two brother-in-laws own these and boat together. The Hewes is the ultimate beach boat for PWS, camp on it or on the shore, anchor or tie it to the beach. The C-Dory is about the range and incredibe places you can experience in PWS. The Sea Sport is a true ocean boat, by the way -it goes faster than either the Hewes or C-Dory regardless of sea conditions and continues to pull away the rougher it gets. I personally need to stay on there good side because I can't afford to own all three, but need all three to fufill my boating tastes.

  16. #16

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    Another glass boat to look at is the Arima 21 and Arima 22.

    These are simple boats, nowhere near as nice as the Ospreys and Seasports, but seaworthy and sturdy and great fishing platforms.

    We have a 17' Arima, and I have had it out in the middle of PWS - on nice days. Got to watch the weather.
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    Quote Originally Posted by dirtface View Post
    I use a 21 foot Striper and have truly tested her in 10 footers in 50 mile winds and she brought me home from Montague.
    This is where motor choice/reliability come into play.... As long as you can keep her pointed into the wind with power you're ok but it only takes one motor hickup to turn sideways and capsize. I've been there too and everytime I get home, I think..... What if... However, a 22ft Sea Sport or similar is big enough. You just pick you're days and play it safe.

  18. #18

    Default A well engineered 22 footer is adequate for NGC, PWS, and CI on most days in summer.

    I don't know where you guys go, but my favorite places to fish are east of Seward. And yes, I go out there all the time in my CD 22. It does fine, but like others have pointed out, you must boat with a brain and watch the weather. There is almost no protection that way and it is often times very rough.

    I will politely differ with Myers on the Seasport and CD 22 comparison. I have a very good friend with a Seasport 24 and when it gets really bad, bad enough that he must come off of plane, he ends up going slower than I do. And his boat is much more difficult to control at those slow speeds. But, on that note, if the seas are only 4 feet or so and not too tightly spaced, he is fishing for a half an hour (or longer) before I get to Johnstone Bay, Puget Bay, or the various capes east of Seward as I am only going 15-18 MPH and he is flying. When the seas catch us a bit, normally around Day Harbor, and the seas are huge, and even crossing, he is going like 7 mph and fighting like hell for control and I am going 10-12 on a really slow plane. I pass right by him. When we get back to the protection of Res Bay, he flies on by. When we pull the boats out of the water, he is at 3 Bears filling the Seasport up for a 20 minutes before I get there since he got back sooner than me, and I am done filling the CD 22 up before he gets done and he had a head start. He has gone in my boat and always comments how calm things and easy things are to control in the CD 22 when things get really crappy. I always comment when in his boat how fast it goes, and how fast it goes smoothly in a 3-4 foot seas. I have also been in it when hunting in the sound when the weather was really bad coming home and wished we were in my boat and he did too. A flat bottom boat is much more stable off of plane, and needs much less speed to plane. On the other hand, we have gone out fishing by Fault Point in Day harbor in his boat and were back to the dock in Seward in what seemed like 5 minutes when the seas were flat. I have no idea how fast we were going, but it was fast and really fun.

    PWS can be treacherous, but it is normally a piece of cake when compared to the North Gulf Coast. I love PWS normally flat seas. A CD 22 (as are a lot of boats) a perfect boat for the sound. I love camping out that way, especially South of Whitier. It is great place. Thank god for the tunnel

    Once again, good luck in your searches!

  19. #19
    Member outaMT's Avatar
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    Default

    Great stuff guys, thanks. Now I need to look at economics. I’ve seen 5-8 year old boats in the size and make discussed in this thread…..as far a used glass boat, what are the risks? Cosmetics and power can always be upgraded/replaced, but what about hull integrity? How many years old would you all consider to be too ‘used’ on a glass boat? SHould you only buy new?
    Alaska fishing will be new to me, especially the salt. If there’s one thing I’ve learned from this forum (and other research) is how different the boating/water dynamics are up there vs. here in Montana….and I realize more and more I’ve got a lot to learn.
    Thanks for taking your time to educate me! All opinions are based on experience…I value both.

  20. #20
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    Don't have to worry much about hull integrity of the glass boat brands you're looking at. As long as the gel coat has been maintained and water hasn't ever had a chance to soak into the fiberglass you're good. One thing to really pay attention to: If the boat has been stored in a boat harbor (saltwater) for years without proper maintenance/care of the gel coat with bottom paint. Look for blistering on the hull below the water line....Not good. Lots of work and money to correct the problem if it isn't already to late... Another thing to check is the condition of the flooring look up under the floor through deck plates and access points. The fiberglass on top may look fine but the plywood underneath may be rotting out. Depending on how bad it is you may or may not want the boat. Most can be repaired by adding extra bracing. Just depends on available access. But I don't think this will be much of an issue with the boats in the 5-8 year range. Mine is twice that old.... I was lucky enough to find a 1993 24' Olympic in very good shape. I had to do a small repair to the flooring next to a deck plate. The caulking around one of the deck plates hadn't been maintained and the plywood underneath (section about 4'' X 16'') had soaked up water and never had a good chance to dry out so it started to get soft. After I bought the boat I dried it out with use of an electric heater added some bracing and re-caulked everything. Good as new.

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