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Thread: good winter boots

  1. #1
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    Default good winter boots

    I went winter camping this weekend and my feet froze today. I have lacrosse's and bunny boots. I used the bunny boots today and my feet froze. I also had a pair of wool socks on. I have cold feet and need a good pair of boots. I'm just wondering what you guys recommend. My bunny boots keep me warm if I prewarm them i.e put them on the boot drier for a hour or so before I got out. I don't can't do that from the tent. Any ideas would be great.

  2. #2

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    Most people don't know it, but bunnies were designed to be worn with a cotton sock.

    You could try prewarming your boots with heat packs too.


    If you are gonna do a lot of sledding, ice fishing, winter camping, you might want to score some of these from ClimbHigh, one of the sponsors
    http://www.climbhighoutlet.com/view/?tx_commerce_pi1[showUid]=485&tx_commerce_pi1[catUid]=28&cHash=6e34aaf9e7


    Wear them over pack boot liners=mukluks. Stuff in a heat pack before a long cold ride.

    You may also want to do the liner sock thing to keep your feet dry if they sweat a lot.
    If you're serious about keeping your feet dry on an overnighter or longer, wear a Sealskinz liner under a Brigedale mountaineering sock under the mukluks.

    I like down booties in the tent or hut. Socks can dry in them. Good to wear in the bag too, if you don't wear your boot liners.

    Stay toasty!!
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    Killin' it!




  3. #3
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    Default Boots

    If your bunny boots wont keep your feet warm I think you need a new pair. I work outside everyday with with either bunny boots or extra-tuffs with bama socks. Bunny boots that get wet underneath the rubber due to a hole or such will not keep your feet warm. I usually get 3-4 seasons out of a pair. I wear wool socks.

  4. #4
    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    Did you have a previous frost bite injury to your feet? If so, you may find it extremely difficult to find a good boot that will fully protect them. A friend of mine had this and the ONLY boot that works for him is Bunnies. But as mentioned by the previous caller, they have to be in good repair. Also, frequent sock changes are required throughout the day.

    I use Sorel's for snowmachine and such and they work pretty good, but for folks who have a "cold foot" problem, they don't seem to work at all. The downside is the lack of complete waterproofing and that they are so bulky and heavy.

    I found an awesome boot this year that I've been pretty impressed with so far. They are the Muck Boots Arctic Sport. I was actually shopping for a set of Xtra Tuffs at The Prospector and saw these boots, which are rubber and neoprene and resemble a typical rubber knee-high boot. They looked pretty good so I picked them up instead of the Tuffs. I tell you, these boots are dang near too hot for me to wear. I was truely impressed and they are so compact and lightweight that it's pretty amazing that they insulate so well. Plus 100% waterproof all the way to the top. I believe these are going to be my new snowmachine boots.

    Check them out:
    http://www.muckbootsonline.com/Arcti..._p/asp000a.htm

    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

  5. #5
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    Default bamas

    As stated above wear bama sockettes. I've found they make all of my boots warmer. Whether they are my extra tuffs or sorels. It's amazing how you take off your boots and the bamas are soaked while socks and feet are nice and dry.

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    Member spoiled one's Avatar
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    I have to second the bamas. They can be seen here: http://www.seattlemarine.net/products/clothing.html and purchased locally (anchorage) at B&J. They will wick most if not all of the moisture away from your foot. I have not worn them with bunny boots, but have with extra tuffs and sorells with great success.
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

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    I hate Bunny Boots, and have since the '60s when I was a little kid. There are much better alternatives now. Lots of alternatives. My wife has the coldest feet of anyone I know. When the temps drop, she wears Northern Outfitters Arctic boots. I can't say enough good things about these boots for folks with cold feet.
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    I tried the Northern Outfitter boots ten years ago. Unfortunately I couldn't keep my feet warm with them after soaking them over the tops in overflow. The biggest benefit of a bunny boot is it's ability to keep a foot warm when even full of water.

    Bunny boots are hard to warm up if they are cold. I solve the problem one of two ways. I toss a full size heat pack in them (not the little hand warmer ones) a half hour before I get into them, or I simply sleep with them at the bottom of my sleeping bag when out winter camping.

  9. #9

    Default Pack boots

    I hate bunny boots also, but if I was travelling on rivers, creeks, water, I would have them as once you get them wet, they will warm up. Check out Cabelas predator boots. Most of the -150 below pack boots are good. I've had mine out at -60 and feet were plenty warm. You can't go wrong with these boots.

  10. #10
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    I use bunny boots(BATAs only) and like them. I buy only new BBs to insure that they are dry inside(between layers). I once had a used pair that my right foot would get cold. I put the boot in the freezer and could hear the ice inside when flexing the toe. I always carry extra wool insoles and extra socks to control foot moisture. The extras that I carry are determined on the type and lenght of activity. I prefer BBs because no matter how cold there is potiential for overflow and open water under the snow. I have found this water several times. Additionally, I find the temprature ratings on some boots laughable.
    Pete
    Last edited by pak; 12-02-2008 at 10:24. Reason: additional information

  11. #11
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    When your extremities are cold, it means your core is cold and your body is reducing blood flow to the extremities. I'd say look at increasing the insulation on your body and drink some warm fluids to keep your core temp up and see if that doesn't help with the cold feet.

    I've only used lacrosse or mountaineering boots in the winter. More and more I've been using mountaineering boots as they are much easier to walk in for longer distances.

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    One trip a few years ago my wife and I spent the weekend at a friend's on Larson Creek near the Talkeetna River. One morning we went riding in -40* and wife quickly found some overflow. No problem. We got it out and spent the day riding. She didn't know her feet were wet until we got back to the cabin at dark and she pulled her Northern Outfitter boots of and poured water out. She had stayed warm all day and the only time she was near water was very early that day. She still has those boots. Awesome gear.

    I've sat on a stuck snowgo in a flowing creek with White's Elk Hunters that were full of water. After a few minutes to warm the water my feet did fine for the hours I had to stay outside trying to get home. No problem. Waterproof foam in the boots and wool felt liners did the job. I also spent a long, cold, wet day in Sorel Glaciers walking in and out of overflow in sub-zero temps to rescue a submerged sled. Again, no problem. Again, waterproof foam in the boots and felt liners. There are lots of good cold weather boots on the market. Bunny Boots are way down on my list. The only advantage Bunny Boots have is that they dry quickly and easily. That doesn't justify the disadvantages for my use.

    The warmest boots I've ever worn are Klim snowgo boots. Not comfortable for anything other than riding, but wow are they warm!

  13. #13
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    Default Mukluks or Bata Bunny Boots

    Definitely don't want to put bunny boots on cold. Trick we use when camping is to pour hot water in them in the morning before putting them on, then dump the water out. Doesn't matter if they are a bit damp inside as they will be anyway after wearing them.

    Steger makes some okay mukluks if you don't have any handmade ones. My mukluks are moosehide and I used a one-inch thick piece of felt for the insoles. Liners are double, a size 13 with a size 11 inside that. They are bulky but keep my feet warm.

    I mostly wear Bata bunny boots now as I usually run into overflow every day on the trail at some point, and they keep my feet warm enough, even after I fill them with ice cold water. I froze my left foot real bad first winter out here, nearly lost some toes, and either the mukluks or the high quality bunny boots do the job for me.

  14. #14

    Default Bunny's or Mickey's

    When you say Bunny's do you mean the black boots (Mickey's) or the white boots (Bunny's)? At least that's the way I've always called them.

    Here's why I ask.

    A friends rule of thumb is the black boots do pretty good to about zero degrees; and beyond that, wear the white boots.

    I'll second what's been said here about frequent sock changes in any boot, and I'll also second what Doug said about sleeping with the boots in the bottom of the bag to "pre" heat them. It isn't exactly a comfortable way to sleep depending on the bag you are using, but it works.

    As for the comment about the boots being meant to be worn with cotton socks, I was always issued wool socks or a wool blend sock in the military, so I'm not sure that's exactly the case, or it was just another version of a military fubar issuing wools instead of cotton or we were just issued wool socks because that what was available.

  15. #15
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    No matter what socks you wear in bunny boots they need to be over the calf socks. Nothing hurts worse than a bunny boot rubbing your legs raw because your socks are too short.

    Black bunny boots work for me down to -20F and they are the ones I primarily wear. They are more fuel resistant than the white ones and are quite a bit lighter on the feet. I save my white ones for over night trips or days that are REALLY cold.

    I will ONLY buy Beta brand bunnies. The rest are junk.

  16. #16
    Member dkwarthog's Avatar
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    I've always used the white bata's and I really like them for the overflow reasons mentioned already. After reading some of the comments I may try some others out as well just to get the weight down when doing alot of walking. I do know that for running dog teams for long distances, I love bunnies for kicking in snowhooks, bouncing off ice chunks or whatever, those things are damm near indestructible unless you poke a hole in the outer skin of the air pockets in which case you can about throw them away cause your feet will freeze in them.

    Has anyone tried the cabelas trans alaska type boots? Ive heard they are good but have never tried them.

    Oh yea, warmest boots I've ever worn are the Northern OUtfitters, but I just cant deal with the bulk of those things, they can be easily pulled off of your foot while running dogs and that is NOT a good thing

  17. #17
    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by upstream View Post
    When you say Bunny's do you mean the black boots (Mickey's) or the white boots (Bunny's)? At least that's the way I've always called them.
    According to the 'bunny boot guy' who sells them out of his truck at Pitman road, and yes he has a cutaway of both a black and a white, they are an identical boot, except the white has one additional layer of insulation. This, in turn, makes them a bit more bulky, but yes, the white are warmer than the black.

  18. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by AKDoug View Post
    No matter what socks you wear in bunny boots they need to be over the calf socks. Nothing hurts worse than a bunny boot rubbing your legs raw because your socks are too short.
    Isn't that the truth.

    Never gotten eaten up by bunny boots, but I worn some crappy worn out socks in some extra tuffs once and paid the price for it hoofing in to fish one of my favorite spots.

  19. #19
    Member byrd_hntr's Avatar
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    Default My take:

    I wear bunnies when I am standing around, predator calling or if its just darn cold out. I have never had cold feet in them. But they aren't my favorite thing to wear. When I first drag out of the tent in the morning I put them on and go for a brisk 10 min walk. I mean really walk, almost jog and my feet warm right up and I wake up. Ive done this down to -40 and it seem to work.

    I also have a pair of Steger Mukluks arctic version I think. They are really light and comfy. They go in my sled and I where them when its cold and there is no need for waterproof boots for overflow. They feel really nice when you feet are wet from being in you bunnies and its like you have nothing but a pair of socks on. As long as you dont get them wet they are some of the best boots I can think of for cold outdoor activities. They don't work very well for sitting still or just standing. They are best for walking or snowshoeing etc.

    I have become a fan of Empire Canvas Works in Duluth MN (American Made which make me happy). They make really nice cold weather stuff. I have a pair of their Expzedtion mittens and an Artic Anorak, and I cant be more pleased. The Anorak is good snow camo too. Anyway I have been eyeing these:

    http://www.empirecanvasworks.com/truenorthboots.htm

    They might be worth a look.
    Last edited by byrd_hntr; 12-02-2008 at 18:34. Reason: Add some stuff, and Im definitly not smarter than a 5th grader.

  20. #20
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    The bottom line is your use of the boot. Bunnies are nice because they are like winter work boots. They are really tough and the toes can take abuse. I can sit all day at -10F in them and run my bulldozer or other equipment, but they still stand up to the beating heavy equipment give them. I can't imagine trying to run the pedals of anything or even snowshoeing in a pair of Northen Outfitter's boots or the ones linked above. However, for sitting around or not walking much the Northern Outfitter boots or the ones linked above probably are going to be the ticket. Just like every gear purchase it just boils down to trying out different things and finding out what works for you.

    I KNOW one thing though. You are NOT going to find a boot that will truely keep your feet warm cheaper than a pair of Beta Bunny Boots for $79 from the guy on the side of the highway in Meadow Lakes.

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